Skip to content


Olympic torch relay faces cool welcome from nuclear evacuees via The Asahi Shimbun

FUTABA, Fukushima Prefecture–Dressed in protective plastic coveralls and white booties, Yuji Onuma stood in front of the row of derelict buildings that included his house, and sighed as he surveyed his old neighborhood.

On the once-bustling main street, reddish weeds poked out of cracked pavements in front of abandoned shops with caved-in walls and crumbling roofs. Nearby, thousands of black plastic bags filled with irradiated soil were stacked in a former rice field.

“It’s like visiting a graveyard,” he said.

Onuma, 43, was back in his hometown of Futaba to check on his house, less than 4 kilometers from the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which suffered a triple meltdown in 2011 following an earthquake and tsunami, leaking radiation across the region.

The authorities say it will be two more years before evacuees can live here again, an eternity for people who have been in temporary housing for nine years. But given the lingering radiation here, Onuma says he has decided not to move back with his wife and two young sons.

Most of his neighbors have moved on, abandoning their houses and renting smaller apartments in nearby cities or settling elsewhere in Japan.

Given the problems Futaba still faces, many evacuees are chafing over the government’s efforts to showcase the town as a shining example of Fukushima’s reconstruction for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

The Olympic torch relay will take place in Fukushima in late March–although possibly in shortened form as a result of the coronavirus, Olympic organizers say–and will pass through Futaba. In preparation, construction crews have been hard at work repairing streets and decontaminating the center of town.

“I wish they wouldn’t hold the relay here,” said Onuma. He pointed to workers repaving the road outside the train station, where the torch runners are likely to pass. “Their number one aim is to show people how much we’ve recovered.”

He said he hoped that the torch relay would also pass through the overgrown and ghostly parts of the town, to convey everything that the 7,100 residents uprooted of Futaba lost as a result of the accident.

“I don’t think people will understand anything by just seeing cleaned-up tracts of land.”

[…]

Read more.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , .


2 Responses

Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.

  1. dark web links says

    Accessing this part of the web is for those who want to use credit cards and other payment processing systems without being actually seen by anyone online.

Continuing the Discussion

  1. Olympic torch relay faces cool welcome from nuclear evacuees via The Asahi Shimbun linked to this post on 2021/04/11

    Sal Delapena

    I found a great…



Some HTML is OK

or, reply to this post via trackback.