Skip to content


Trump’s message for tribes: Let them eat yellowcake via High Country News

By Jacqueline Keeler

Uranium, it’s now part of Navajo DNA. With over 500 abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation, people living near these mines are exposed daily to radiation exposure at a rate several times higher than normal background radiation. Last week, President Donald Trump announced he was summarily reducing the Bears Ears National Monument by 85 percent, thereby opening archaeologically rich sites to uranium mining. 

From the 1940s to the 1980s, 30 million tons of uranium were extracted from mines on the Navajo Nation. Today, more than 500 abandoned uranium mines remain on the reservation, which stretches 27,000 square miles from the south rim of the Grand Canyon past Gallup, New Mexico, and north to the San Juan River in Utah, poisoning the water and carrying in the dust. Only one mine has been cleaned up. It is estimated that total cleanup will cost between $4 billion to $6 billion and could take a century to complete. A recent study by researchersfrom the University of New Mexico found 85 percent of Navajo homes had uranium contamination, and Navajos living near these mines have higher levels of uranium in their bones than 95 percent of the American population. Even infants have been found to have uranium in their urine.

In a penetrating series of articles on uranium mining’s legacy in the Navajo Nation, published by the Arizona Republic in 2014, Lillie Lane, the Navajo Nation’s Environmental Protection Agency outreach coordinator, told the newspaper the radiation has tainted their chromosomes. “I think we are still in the infant stages of seeing what the impacts are in the gene pool of the Navajo people,” she said.

[…]

On Friday, the Washington Post broke the story that Energy Fuels Resources, owners of the Daneros Uranium Mine and the White Mesa Uranium Mill, had lobbied the Interior Department to reduce the monument because it impeded their business interests in the area, effectively refuting Zinke and Trump’s claims energy interests did not play a role. In a May 2017 letter to the Interior, the company’s chief operating officer, Mark Chalmers, urged the monument be reduced because there are “many known uranium and vanadium deposits located within the newly created (Bears Ears National Monument) that could provide valuable energy and mineral resources in the future.”

[…]
 

 

Read more.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


A Little 3 Minute Film About Attempts To Re-open Most Dangerous Coal Mine In The UK Near Sellafield Nuclear Site via Keep Cumbrian Coal in the Hole

AGAINST THE PLAN Are:  The Coal Authority, National Trust, Natural England, Colourful Coast Partnership, RSPB, Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, The Environment Agency, Coal Action Network and Many More!

 

Read more.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) – Nobel Lecture via Nobelprize.org

(Setsuko Thurlow)

I speak as a member of the family of hibakusha – those of us who, by some miraculous chance, survived the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. For more than seven decades, we have worked for the total abolition of nuclear weapons.

We have stood in solidarity with those harmed by the production and testing of these horrific weapons around the world. People from places with long-forgotten names, like Moruroa, Ekker, Semipalatinsk, Maralinga, Bikini. People whose lands and seas were irradiated, whose bodies were experimented upon, whose cultures were forever disrupted.

We were not content to be victims. We refused to wait for an immediate fiery end or the slow poisoning of our world. We refused to sit idly in terror as the so-called great powers took us past nuclear dusk and brought us recklessly close to nuclear midnight. We rose up. We shared our stories of survival. We said: humanity and nuclear weapons cannot coexist.

[…]

Through our agony and the sheer struggle to survive – and to rebuild our lives from the ashes – we hibakusha became convinced that we must warn the world about these apocalyptic weapons. Time and again, we shared our testimonies.

But still some refused to see Hiroshima and Nagasaki as atrocities – as war crimes. They accepted the propaganda that these were “good bombs” that had ended a “just war”. It was this myth that led to the disastrous nuclear arms race – a race that continues to this day.

Nine nations still threaten to incinerate entire cities, to destroy life on earth, to make our beautiful world uninhabitable for future generations. The development of nuclear weapons signifies not a country’s elevation to greatness, but its descent to the darkest depths of depravity. These weapons are not a necessary evil; they are the ultimate evil.

On the seventh of July this year, I was overwhelmed with joy when a great majority of the world’s nations voted to adopt the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Having witnessed humanity at its worst, I witnessed, that day, humanity at its best. We hibakusha had been waiting for the ban for seventy-two years. Let this be the beginning of the end of nuclear weapons.

[…]

When I was a 13-year-old girl, trapped in the smouldering rubble, I kept pushing. I kept moving toward the light. And I survived. Our light now is the ban treaty. To all in this hall and all listening around the world, I repeat those words that I heard called to me in the ruins of Hiroshima: “Don’t give up! Keep pushing! See the light? Crawl towards it.”

Tonight, as we march through the streets of Oslo with torches aflame, let us follow each other out of the dark night of nuclear terror. No matter what obstacles we face, we will keep moving and keep pushing and keep sharing this light with others. This is our passion and commitment for our one precious world to survive.

Read more

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) – Nobel Lecture via Nobelprize.org

[Beatrice Fihn:]

[…]

At dozens of locations around the world – in missile silos buried in our earth, on submarines navigating through our oceans, and aboard planes flying high in our sky – lie 15,000 objects of humankind’s destruction.

Perhaps it is the enormity of this fact, perhaps it is the unimaginable scale of the consequences, that leads many to simply accept this grim reality. To go about our daily lives with no thought to the instruments of insanity all around us.

For it is insanity to allow ourselves to be ruled by these weapons. Many critics of this movement suggest that we are the irrational ones, the idealists with no grounding in reality. That nuclear-armed states will never give up their weapons.

But we represent the only rational choice. We represent those who refuse to accept nuclear weapons as a fixture in our world, those who refuse to have their fates bound up in a few lines of launch code.

Ours is the only reality that is possible. The alternative is unthinkable.

The story of nuclear weapons will have an ending, and it is up to us what that ending will be.

Will it be the end of nuclear weapons, or will it be the end of us?

One of these things will happen.

[…]

Nobel Laureate William Faulkner said when accepting his prize in 1950, that “There is only the question of ‘when will I be blown up?'” But since then, this universal fear has given way to something even more dangerous: denial.

[…]

As the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, the first ever anti-nuclear weapons organisation to win this prize, said on this stage in 1985:

“We physicians protest the outrage of holding the entire world hostage. We protest the moral obscenity that each of us is being continuously targeted for extinction.”

Those words still ring true in 2017.

We must reclaim the freedom to not live our lives as hostages to imminent annihilation.

Man – not woman! – made nuclear weapons to control others, but instead we are controlled by them.

They made us false promises. That by making the consequences of using these weapons so unthinkable it would make any conflict unpalatable. That it would keep us free from war.

But far from preventing war, these weapons brought us to the brink multiple times throughout the Cold War. And in this century, these weapons continue to escalate us towards war and conflict.

[…]

A choice between the two endings: the end of nuclear weapons or the end of us.

It is not naive to believe in the first choice. It is not irrational to think nuclear states can disarm. It is not idealistic to believe in life over fear and destruction; it is a necessity.

[…]

No nation today boasts of being a chemical weapon state.
No nation argues that it is acceptable, in extreme circumstances, to use sarin nerve agent.
No nation proclaims the right to unleash on its enemy the plague or polio.

That is because international norms have been set, perceptions have been changed.

And now, at last, we have an unequivocal norm against nuclear weapons.

[…]

 

 

Read more.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


Uranium Firm Urged Trump Officials to Shrink Bears Ears National Monument via Washington Post

 uranium company launched a concerted lobbying campaign to scale back Bears Ears National Monument, saying such action would give it easier access to the area’s uranium deposits and help it operate a nearby processing mill, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and top Utah Republicans have said repeatedly that questions of mining or drilling played no role in President Trump’s announcement Monday that he was cutting the site by more than 1.1 million acres, or 85 percent. Trump also signed a proclamation nearly halving the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which is also in southern Utah and has significant coal deposits.

“This is not about energy,” Zinke told reporters Tuesday. “There is no mine within Bears Ears.”

But the nation’s sole uranium processing mill sits directly next to the boundaries that President Barack Obama designated a year ago when he established Bears Ears. The documents show that Energy Fuels Resources (USA) Inc., a subsidiary of a Canadian firm, urged the Trump administration to limit the monument to the smallest size needed to protect key objects and areas, such as archeological sites, to make it easier to access the radioactive ore.

In a May 25 letter to the Interior Department, Chief Operating Officer Mark Chalmers wrote that the 1.35 million-acre expanse Obama created “could affect existing and future mill operations.” He later noted, “There are also many other known uranium and vanadium deposits located within the [original boundaries] that could provide valuable energy and mineral resources in the future.”

Trump instructed Zinke in April to assess 27 monuments designated under the 1906 Antiquities Act, which gives presidents wide latitude to protect federal lands and waters under threat. Conservationists, tribal officials, ranching groups and other interests sought to influence the review’s outcome, unsuccessfully in the case of the two Utah sites.

Gov. Gary R. Herbert (R-Utah) addressed the energy considerations in an interview Monday. “The only thing that smacks of energy is the uranium,” he said. “The uranium deposits are outside the monument now.”

Energy Fuels Resources did not just weigh in on national monuments through public-comment letters. It hired a team of lobbyists at Faegre Baker Daniels — led by Andrew Wheeler, who is awaiting Senate confirmation as the Environmental Protection Agency’s deputy secretary — to work on the matter and other federal policies affecting the company. It paid the firm $30,000 between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30, according to federal lobbying records, for work on this and other priorities.

[…]

Company officials “were trying to get a sense of what was going on” with the review because some of their air and water quality monitoring stations and a road leading to the now-dormant Daneros mine all lay within the original monument, Goranson explained.

“The goal of the meeting . . . was not to go and advocate on the boundaries,” he said, adding that the lobbying for that was “on a separate track.” Still, the officials proposed small boundary adjustments to accommodate the monitoring stations as well as the mine, he acknowledged. And they emphasized that the company had cut its workforce by more than half since 2015 because of low uranium prices.

“They heard what we had to say about the job losses, etc.,” he said. Zinke’s deputies “were pretty positively disposed to” the idea of spurring future domestic uranium production.

The Interior Department did not respond to a request for comment Friday.

The price of uranium has recently hovered between $20 and $25 per pound. To justify mining activity, it needs to approach $40 to $50. Michael Heim, a securities research analyst at Noble Capital Markets, said Friday that the current amount “is not a sustainable price” for firms such as Energy Fuels Resources. Given today’s price, Heim said, “the idea of creating more areas to mine wouldn’t have much impact.”

[…]

 

Read more.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , .


(人模様) 原発事故の日本を思い続け ポポウィチュ・ぺーテルさん via 毎日新聞

東日本大震災を機に20代を過ごした日本を離れ、欧州に戻ったハンガリー人のポポウィチュ・ぺーテルさん(36)が今年3月、当時の心境を著作「3・11~愛する日本を去る日」にまとめた。欧州人が感じた震災の衝撃が、ハンガリー語と日本語で記されている。

 

 2001年に19歳で来日。個人を重視する欧州に比べて人間関係を大事にする日本が好きになり、日本語も堪能になった。在日のドイツ系企業に就職し、そのまま日本で暮らすつもりだった。

 「あの日」は横浜市の会社で迎えた。頭をよぎったのは出身地に近いウクライナ・チェルノブイリの原発事故だ。当時、娘は生後2カ月。関東地方に放射性物質の飛来が報じられ、帰国を決断した。

 当時の判断が間違っていたとは思わない。だが日本への思いは消えなかった。今年8月、安定した職を捨て、スウェーデンで日欧の企業を比較研究する学生となった。「脱原発」が進まない現状には失望しつつ、「大好きな日本に何らかの恩返しをしたい」と願う。【三木幸治】

 

 

全文

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


福島)双葉郡ふるさと創造学サミットが開催 via 朝日新聞

[…]

浪江中は、故郷に伝わる大堀相馬焼の窯元の一人にインタビューをし、地元の文化を考えた。窯元の松永武士さん(29)は元々は跡を継ぐつもりがなく中国で会社を経営していた。しかし、東日本大震災をきっかけに大堀の「誇り」をつないでいきたいという気持ちが強くなり窯元を継いだ。マレーシア三越伊勢丹で販売するなど新しい挑戦を続けている。

松永さんが多くの人にモノづくりの世界を体験してもらおうと考案した「バーチャルろくろシステム」の実演も披露。センサーを使って仮想空間上で好きな形の「陶器」を作ることができる。

[…]

ログイン前の続き富岡一・二小は学校の先生など身近な大人にアンケートをして、「ふるさとはどんな所か」、「富岡とはどんな所か」を考え、クイズ形式で発表した。大熊町の熊町・大野小は地元に伝わる「じゃんがら念仏太鼓踊り」を実演を交えながら紹介したり、大熊町の特産品を使った弁当作りに挑戦したことを説明したりした。

ふるさと創造学は、8町村の小中学校とふたば未来学園高校で行われている地域を題材とする学習活動。故郷の魅力を発見し、新しいふるさとの姿を考えることで主体性・創造性などを伸ばし、自ら未来を切り開く力を育むのが狙いだ。(小泉浩樹

 

全文

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


SPECIAL: U-Chicago Atomic Propaganda Orgy Decoded by Fairewinds’ Arnie Gundersen & NEIS – Errors, Omissions & Lies, Oh My! – via Nuclear Hotsat

The University of Chicago produced a month-long orgy of pro-nuclear self-congratulations to celebrate the first atomic pile, the chain reaction which started our collective nuclear nightmare.  The events culminated in a Symposium, “Nuclear Reaction,”  held on December 1, 2017, featuring relentless pro-nuclear propaganda.

Nuclear Hotseat was there to cover the events through the eyes of those who know enough to oppose nuclear, along with NEIS-sponsored events presented as a counterbalance.

Hear feedback and perspective on the human toll of the Atomic Age from:

  • Arnie Gundersen, Chief Engineer, Fairewinds Energy Education
  • Dave Kraft, Executive Director, Nuclear Energy Information Service (NEIS)
  • Norma Field, PhD, the Robert S. Ingersoll  Distinguished Service Professor Emerita of Japanese Studies at the University of Chicago
  • NEIS Board Members and Activists, including Gail Snyder, Jan Boudart, Steven Sondheim (NEIS member, Sierra Club Nuclear Free Campaign).

Who Was There for the Pro-Nuclear Self-Congratulations?

  • Former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz
  • President and CEO of ExelonChris Crane
  • Representatives of Department of EnergyStanford University, and of course, University of Chicago

Numnutz of the Week (For Nuclear Boneheadedness):

Fireworks?!?  Shaped like a mushroom cloud?!?  Exploded over the site of the first atomic pile, which led to all the rest of the nuclear madness?!?  Someone needs to explain “mixed metaphor” to those numnutz at the U of C!

 

 

 

Here for podcast and “Numnutz” video.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , , , .


泊原発、地震想定が白紙に 「活断層なし」立証できず via 朝日新聞

 北海道電力泊原発1~3号機の再稼働に向けた審査で、原子力規制委員会が、了承していた地震の揺れの想定を白紙に戻す方針であることが7日、わかった。北海道電が敷地内に活断層がない証拠としてきた火山灰の層が、再調査で確認できなかったためだ。審査は振り出しに戻り、再稼働の時期は見通せなくなった。北海道電の経営に影響する可能性もある。

 新規制基準に基づく審査では、約12万~13万年前よりも後に動いた断層を活断層とみなす。活断層原子炉建屋などの重要施設の直下にあれば廃炉が迫られるほか、直下になくても敷地内にあると地震の揺れが大きくなり、建物に高い耐震対策が求められる。

[…]

 

 

全文

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


二審もメーカー責任認めず 原発事故で東京高裁 via 日本経済新聞

東京電力福島第1原子力発電所事故の責任は原発メーカーにもあるとして、国内外の原告約3700人がメーカー3社に1人当たり100円の損害賠償を求めた訴訟の控訴審判決が8日、東京高裁であった。畠山稔裁判長はメーカーの賠償責任を認めなかった一審・東京地裁判決を支持し、原告側の控訴を棄却した。

メーカーは、米ゼネラル・エレクトリック(GE)日本法人、東芝日立製作所の3社。

畠山裁判長は判決理由で、原発事故の賠償責任を電力会社のみに負わせる現行の賠償制度について「政府の援助で手厚い被害者保護を図る仕組みが用いられている」として合理性を認め、メーカーの賠償責任を否定した。

原告側は「メーカーの賠償責任を問えないのは不合理であり、財産権を保障する憲法に違反している」と主張していた。

 

 

原文

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , , .