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Utility Reform Eluding Japan After Nuclear Plant Disaster via The New York Times

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Published: November 17, 2011

TOKYO — In a direct act of rebellion against Tokyo Electric Power Company, which owns the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, the local government in Tokyo is moving swiftly to build a huge natural gas facility that would generate as much electricity as a nuclear reactor.

Toshio Nishizawa, president of Tokyo Electric Power Company, denied that the company wielded too much power.

The plant would ensure a stable supply of electricity for the capital in the aftermath of the nuclear meltdowns in March at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. But more important, the city government says, it could spur desperately needed change in Japan. By weakening Tokyo Electric, or Tepco, reformers hope to finally break the linchpin of the collusion between business and government that once drove Japan’s rapid postwar rise, but that now keeps it mired in stagnation.

“Now’s our chance,” said Naoki Inose, Tokyo’s vice governor, invoking an ancient proverb about attacking a wild dog only after it has fallen into a river: “On March 11, Tepco became the dog that fell into the river. Only then can you fight against such a formidable foe.”

So formidable a foe, in fact, that just eight months after Japanese leaders vowed the nuclear disaster — like the end of World War II — would lead to a kind of rebirth, the chances for fundamental change are rapidly slipping away.

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3 Responses

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  1. Priscilla Judd says

    Who said that TEPCO was allowed to pollute my air in Canada without being held to account?? It is outrageous that this worldwide Corporate disaster , has been allowed to continue unabated. Who said a corporation was allowed to kill our planet? If a person did this they would be executed – this corporation should be given the death penalty by lethal injection of plutonium – (Kill the company -not the human people) get the meltdown stopped! No More Nuclear!

  2. Kampala International University says

    Kampala International University (KIU) is a private, not-for-profit institution based in Uganda. It was established in 2001 and assumed chattered status in 2009. University which started as a typical degree-awarding institution has now grown into the number one Private University in Uganda and is currently ranked number 4 out of 65 universities in the country according to the January 2020 Webometrics Ranking of World Universities.
    In pursuit of the dream to raise the next generation of problem-solvers for the East African region and indeed the whole of Africa, the University operates a multi-campus system which consists of two campuses in Uganda (The Main campus in Kampala and the Western Campus in Ishaka-Bushenyi); one other university in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, while a third one is being developed in Nairobi Kenya.
    KIU has 49 academic departments offering a total of over 150 academic programme in arts, law, business, communication arts, computer science and information technology, engineering, education, , language and literature, mathematics, Physical and biological sciences, social science, and technology education, Medicine and Clinical Science, Biomedical Sciences, Nursing Science and Dentistry at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. All the programs are accredited by the Uganda’s National Council for Higher Education, National and Regional professional bodies, agencies including the EAC.
    Among the University’s premier units receiving special recognition is the Kampala International University Teaching Hospital and the University’s The Iddi Basajjabalaba Memorial Library – IBML which has been adjudged by both internal and external observers to be one of the best in the region.

  3. Francisca Oladipo says

    Things like these make it difficult for developing countries to ever be able to deploy nuclear energy despite its many advantages. For developed worlds, any leakage or disaster can be contained, but for the third world, the reverse will be the case.



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