Skip to content


‘It’s like the embers in a barbecue pit.’ Nuclear reactions are smoldering again at Chernobyl via Science

By Richard Stone

Thirty-five years after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine exploded in the world’s worst nuclear accident, fission reactions are smoldering again in uranium fuel masses buried deep inside a mangled reactor hall. “It’s like the embers in a barbecue pit,” says Neil Hyatt, a nuclear materials chemist at the University of Sheffield. Now, Ukrainian scientists are scrambling to determine whether the reactions will wink out on their own—or require extraordinary interventions to avert another accident.

Sensors are tracking a rising number of neutrons, a signal of fission, streaming from one inaccessible room, Anatolii Doroshenko of the Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants (ISPNPP) in Kyiv, Ukraine, reported last week during discussions about dismantling the reactor. “There are many uncertainties,” says ISPNPP’s Maxim Saveliev. “But we can’t rule out the possibility of [an] accident.” The neutron counts are rising slowly, Saveliev says, suggesting managers still have a few years to figure out how to stifle the threat. Any remedy he and his colleagues come up with will be of keen interest to Japan, which is coping with the aftermath of its own nuclear disaster 10 years ago at Fukushima, Hyatt notes. “It’s a similar magnitude of hazard.”

[…]

The concrete-and-steel sarcophagus called the Shelter, erected 1 year after the accident to house Unit Four’s remains, allowed rainwater to seep in. Because water slows, or moderates, neutrons and thus enhances their odds of striking and splitting uranium nuclei, heavy rains would sometimes send neutron counts soaring. After a downpour in June 1990, a “stalker”—a scientist at Chernobyl who risks radiation exposure to venture into the damaged reactor hall—dashed in and sprayed gadolinium nitrate solution, which absorbs neutrons, on an FCM that he and his colleagues feared might go critical. Several years later, the plant installed gadolinium nitrate sprinklers in the Shelter’s roof. But the spray can’t effectively penetrate some basement rooms.

[…]

The threat can’t be ignored. As water continues to recede, the fear is that “the fission reaction accelerates exponentially,” Hyatt says, leading to “an uncontrolled release of nuclear energy.” There’s no chance of a repeat of 1986, when the explosion and fire sent a radioactive cloud over Europe. A runaway fission reaction in an FCM could sputter out after heat from fission boils off the remaining water. Still, Saveliev notes, although any explosive reaction would be contained, it could threaten to bring down unstable parts of the rickety Shelter, filling the NSC with radioactive dust.

[..]

The resurgent fission reactions are not the only challenge facing Chernobyl’s keepers. Besieged by intense radiation and high humidity, the FCMs are disintegrating—spawning even more radioactive dust that complicates plans to dismantle the Shelter. Early on, an FCM formation called the Elephant’s Foot was so hard scientists had to use a Kalashnikov rifle to shear off a chunk for analysis. “Now it more or less has the consistency of sand,” Saveliev says.

Ukraine has long intended to remove the FCMs and store them in a geological repository. By September, with help from European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, it aims to have a comprehensive plan for doing so. But with life still flickering within the Shelter, it may be harder than ever to bury the reactor’s restless remains.

Read more at ‘It’s like the embers in a barbecue pit.’ Nuclear reactions are smoldering again at Chernobyl

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


8 Responses

Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.

  1. zee says

    nice one keep posting

  2. mygreatlakes says

    Thanks for the information keep sharing such informative post keep suggesting such post.

  3. dark web links says

    It is not hard to understand the reason as to why many people do not trust credit and dark web links. Even though we have all been warned about these kinds of links on the Internet, we still blindly click on them without making a second thought. But, why is it that people go for these kinds of payment links? What exactly is the danger involved with these types of links?

  4. Rekeying Tempe AZ says

    I got what you mean , thanks for posting .Woh I am happy to find this website through google.
    Rekeying Tempe AZ

  5. Muds Management says

    Good post, as a shareholder not sure of how to claim share certificate from iepf no worries Muds Management can provide better solutions to all queries.

Continuing the Discussion

  1. Chernobyl’s nuclear fuel is ‘smoldering’ again and could explode via Live Science – The Atomic Age linked to this post on 2021/05/15

    […] Related article on the Atomic Age website: ‘It’s like the embers in a barbecue pit.’ Nuclear reactions are smoldering again at Chernobyl … […]



Some HTML is OK

or, reply to this post via trackback.