Skip to content


Hidden agenda: The unspoken argument for more nuclear power via Beyond Nuclear International

By Linda Pentz Gunter

So here we are again at another COP (Conference of the Parties). Well, some of us are in Glasgow, Scotland at the COP itself, and some of us, this writer included, are sitting at a distance, trying to feel hopeful.

But this is COP 26. That means there have already been 25 tries at dealing with the once impending and now upon us climate crisis. Twenty five rounds of “blah, blah, blah” as youth climate activist, Greta Thunberg, so aptly put it. 

[…]

But what are the world’s greatest greenhouse gas emitters consumed with right now? Upgrading and expanding their nuclear weapons arsenals. Another crime against humanity. It’s as if they haven’t even noticed that our planet is already going quite rapidly to hell in a handbasket. They’d just like to hasten things along a bit by inflicting a nuclear armageddon on us as well.

Not that the two things are unconnected. The civilian nuclear power industry is desperately scrambling to find a way into the COP climate solutions. It has rebranded itself as “zero-carbon”, which is a lie. And this lie goes unchallenged by our willing politicians who blithely repeat it. Are they really that lazy and stupid? Possibly not. Read on.

Nuclear power isn’t a climate solution of course. It can make no plausible financial case, compared with renewables and energy efficiency, nor can it deliver nearly enough electricity in time to stay the inexorable onrush of climate catastrophe. It is too slow, too expensive, too dangerous, hasn’t solved its lethal waste problem and presents a potentially disastrous security and proliferation risk. 

Nuclear power is so slow and expensive that it doesn’t even matter whether or not it is ‘low-carbon’ (let alone ‘zero-carbon’). As the scientist, Amory Lovins, says, “ Being carbon-free does not establish climate-effectiveness.” If an energy source is too slow and too costly, it will “reduce and retard achievable climate protection,” no matter how ‘low-carbon’ it is.

This leaves only one possible rationale for the political obsession with keeping the nuclear power industry alive: its indispensability to the nuclear weapons sector.

New, small, fast reactors will make plutonium, essential to the nuclear weapons industry as Henry Sokolski and Victor Gilinsky of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center continue to point out. Some of these so-called micro-reactors would be used to power the military battlefield. The Tennessee Valley Authority is already using two of its civilian nuclear reactors to produce tritium, another key “ingredient” for nuclear weapons and a dangerous blurring of the military and civil nuclear lines.

Keeping existing reactors going, and building new ones, maintains the lifeline of personnel and know-how needed by the nuclear weapons sector. Dire warnings are being sounded in the halls of power about the threat to national security should the civil nuclear sector fade away.

This is more than a hypothesis. It is all spelled out in numerous documents from bodies such as The Atlantic Council to The Energy Futures Initiative. It has been well researched by two stellar academics at the University of Sussex in the UK — Andy Stirling and Phil Johnstone. It’s just almost never talked about. Including by those of us in the anti-nuclear power movement, much to Stirling and Johnstone’s consternation.

But in a way it’s just glaringly obvious. As we in the anti-nuclear movement wrack our brains to understand why our perfectly empirical and compelling arguments against using nuclear power for climate fall perpetually on deaf ears, we are maybe missing the fact that the nuclear-is-essential-for-climate arguments we hear are just one big smokescreen.

[…]

Read more.

Posted in *English.

Tagged with , , .


33 Responses

Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.

  1. Barbaroslar says

    Thank you so much
    Great

  2. Bruece says

    Thanks for sharing

  3. SuyashSingh says

    Thank you for your great content

  4. javananefarda says

    thank you for sharing this post
    http://javananefarda.rozblog.com/

  5. betflix slot says

    IF you like Casino online, we recommendpg betflix The lucky person could be you.

  6. Business Card says

    Service mondial d’impression offset en ligne, opportunité de franchise,
    divers produits d’impression. Online Global Offset Printing Service,
    Franchise Opportunity, Various Printing Products. Brochures, Broşür,
    Flyer, Envelopes, Banners, Afiş,
    tapis de voitre reçu
    https://www.europeprintshop.com/

  7. كشف تسربات المياه بمكه says

    Awesome thank you for sharing the amazing article.

  8. El ilanı says

    Olobal Online Ofset Baskı servisi
    https://www.europeprintshop.com/

  9. toni kroos says

    Hello I am Toni, I live in USA, I found this post very useful, it contains a content with useful information. It is very helpful for everyone. If you are looking for a spray foam services kindly check, Spray Foam Insulation Fort Worth TX . I took services from them and it was a great experience with them.

  10. سهیل گیفت says

    It was great. Thank you.خودکار فلزی

  11. Tracy Hamilton says

    Thank you again for all the knowledge you distribute,Good post. I was very interested in the article, it’s quite inspiring I should admit.I like visiting your site since I always come across interesting articles like this one Men Bomber Jacket

  12. Nisha knapp says

    The quality and quantity of work produced here are absolutely informative. Thanks for sharing. My site:: 메이저사이트추천

  13. asad says

    Quite exciting subject, appreciate it pertaining to putting up. เว็บบาคาร่า อันดับ1

  14. ماه ایمن says

    It was a good article.کفش کار

  15. kee says

    “The contributions of children have often been overlooked,” says Page. In the past, due to strict concepts of what constitutes work and play, researchers tended not to notice that a child could be playing around one moment and grabbing fruit from a bush the next. “Children are definitely subsidising themselves (in such hunter-gatherer societies),” she says.
    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านรางม่วง

  16. kee says

    “The contributions of children have often been overlooked,” says Page. In the past, due to strict concepts of what constitutes work and play, researchers tended not to notice that a child could be playing around one moment and grabbing fruit from a bush the next. “Children are definitely subsidising themselves (in such hunter-gatherer societies),” she says.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านมะขามเอน 

  17. kee says

    “The contributions of children have often been overlooked,” says Page. In the past, due to strict concepts of what constitutes work and play, researchers tended not to notice that a child could be playing around one moment and grabbing fruit from a bush the next. “Children are definitely subsidising themselves (in such hunter-gatherer societies),” she says.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านทุ่งแฝก

  18. kee says

    “The contributions of children have often been overlooked,” says Page. In the past, due to strict concepts of what constitutes work and play, researchers tended not to notice that a child could be playing around one moment and grabbing fruit from a bush the next. “Children are definitely subsidising themselves (in such hunter-gatherer societies),” she says.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านหนองแร้ง

  19. kee says

    “The contributions of children have often been overlooked,” says Page. In the past, due to strict concepts of what constitutes work and play, researchers tended not to notice that a child could be playing around one moment and grabbing fruit from a bush the next. “Children are definitely subsidising themselves (in such hunter-gatherer societies),” she says.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่ม โรงเรียนวัดมะเฟือง

  20. me says

    This resurgence in interest in root bridges is in part thanks to the efforts of Morningstar Khongthaw, a native from Rangthylliang village, who founded the Living Bridge Foundation. Khongthaw and his team create awareness about root bridges, repair and maintain old bridges while also constructing new ones.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านกันละ

  21. me says

    Ludwig sees these bridges as an example of not just sustainable development, which minimises the damage and degradation of natural systems, but of regenerative development. The latter attempts to reverse degradation and improve the health of the ecosystem. But understanding the living root bridges is not an easy process.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนวัดหลักช้าง

  22. kee says

    Ludwig sees these bridges as an example of not just sustainable development, which minimises the damage and degradation of natural systems, but of regenerative development. The latter attempts to reverse degradation and improve the health of the ecosystem. But understanding the living root bridges is not an easy process.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนวัดนางเอื้อย

  23. kee says

    The lack of historical written information on the bridges has also been a challenge in researching them. Until the British colonial period in the 19th Century, native Khasi inhabitants in Meghalaya didn’t have a written script, as the Khasi way of life is passed down through oral histories. This has meant that documented information on the bridges is sparse.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่ม โรงเรียนบ้านทุ่งตำเสา

  24. 789bet says

    สล็อต789
    There are pretty, beautiful girls who are always dealing with cards without getting bored.

  25. car says

    But while personnel understaffing is visual, expertise understaffing is insidious. Depending on your viewpoint, that makes it harder for bosses to detect – or simply easier to overlook. “If an experienced person leaves, it can’t be assumed that those remaining can pick up the slack,” says Shen.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนวัดวังรีบุญเลิศ 

  26. car says

    The effects of the pandemic, and the subsequent Great Resignation, have created the perfect storm for understaffing. Typically, labour shortages build over years as economies boom in the wake of recession. This process, however, was accelerated following the first lockdown; the economic downturn was short and the demand for workers exploded once sectors reopened. But then millions of people began quitting their jobs.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านรางม่วง

  27. car says

    Gad Levanon, head of the Labor Market Institute at US economic think tank The Conference Board, believes labour shortages could reach greater heights in the new year. “We’re still likely to see greater demands for workers in 2022 because many sectors – hospitality, leisure, transport – are yet to fully recover,” says Levanon. “People are more selective in what they want to do, and you can’t just hire someone off the street and give them a trade job; they require much skill and experience, and that takes time.”

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนบ้านมะขามเอน 

  28. car says

    Some businesses are acknowledging they now have to fight to keep their staff, and are beginning to reflect loyal employees’ extra workload by increasing salaries. “There’s growing evidence that employers are giving raises – the average wage in the US is up significantly,” says Levanon. Meanwhile, workers who are covering for depleted teams and are yet to be rewarded with a pay rise or promotion do at least have some pushback. Unlike understaffing during a recession, they could be in high demand if they quit.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่มเติม โรงเรียนวัดแสงประดิษฐ์

  29. car says

    That doesn’t mean employees have to necessarily hand in their notice. The current battle for retention gives workers more leverage if they feel overworked, opening opportunities to flag issues to oblivious bosses. “An employee can report understaffing to a line manager and say they can consider their options unless a proper plan is put in place,” says Noelle Murphy, of UK HR resourcing provider XpertHR.

    อ่านต่อเพิ่ม โรงเรียนบ้านหนองแร้ง



Some HTML is OK

or, reply to this post via trackback.