Creating Media Group Folders in Luna

Folders can be used to organize multiple media groups created in Luna. Folders can contain single media groups, or can house multiple sub-folders.

  1. To begin creating the main folder, select the gray “Create Folder” button in the top middle section.

2. Name your folder, making sure that none of the “Parent Folders” are selected. Hit submit.

3. The folder now lives under “My Media Groups”. By hovering the cursor over the name and selecting one of the icons to the right, you can create a new sub-folder, edit the main folder, delete the folder, or create a media group.

4. To create a media group within the main folder, select the icon with three squares.

This brings up a window to name the media group and select the folder it lives in. Click save. This group functions like any other Luna media group, storing a selected set of images.

5. To create a sub-folder, select the icon of the folder with a + sign.

6. This opens a window to name the sub-folder and select the Parent Folder it lives under. Be sure that a Parent Folder is highlighted. Click submit.

7. Expanding the parent folder will reveal any sub-folders and media groups it houses (i.e. parent folder “Paper #1” houses sub-folder “Subtopic Folder #1” and the media group “Main Image”). Subfolders can be used like main folders: hovering over the name will reveal the icons that allow you to create a media group or another folder within it.

As you are working with multiple folders, be sure that images are added to the correct media group through the “Active Media Group” tab at the bottom. You can toggle between which media group you want to save the image to via the blue drop down menu. 

How to Create a Luna Module in Canvas

View and share your images directly within Canvas! Creating a Luna Module in Canvas is a great way to provide your students with easy access to sets of images for review and close-looking. You could also use it to share a bank of images for test prep or assignments.

  1. Under the “Modules” tab on the left task bar, start by either creating a new module for your Luna collection, or working with a pre existing module

2. Add an item to your selected module by clicking the + button, select add “External URL” from the drop-down menu and name your group of images.

3. To get the URL for your LUNA images, open the group and select “Share” from the top menu and copy the provided URL.

4. Paste this URL in the Canvas menu and complete by clicking the red “Add Item” button.

Optional: checking “Load in a new tab” will open Luna in a new browser tab instead of within Canvas.

5. Be sure to publish both the new item and the overall module it lives under. Once published, clicking on the item title will open the interactive Luna module within Canvas. The module acts similarly to Luna’s full website, but allows direct access to a curated set of images. Like the website, image records can be explored individually within the module, and images can be downloaded via the “Export” button. 


Photographing in the Field Workshop

Photographing in the Field Workshop
Wednesday, May 10, 12:00-1pm CWAC Rm 257
Hosted by the Visual Resources Center
Will you be going on a research trip this summer and could use some photography tips and tricks? This workshop will discuss basic camera controls and techniques for taking pictures in museums, archives, and architectural sites. We will also discuss some simple Photoshop techniques used to improve photographs taken in difficult situations. Come with questions and your camera! Sandwiches will be provided after the workshop. RSVP to wgaylord@uchicago.edu.

Image by © Babak Tafreshi/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

 

Robert Abbott “Bobby” Sengstacke: 1943-2017

Bobby Sengstacke Watching the Painting of the Wall of Respect, Chicago, 1967.

It is with great sadness that we share the passing of Robert Abbott “Bobby” Sengstacke, 1943-2017, a legendary Chicago photographer of the Civil Rights Movement, Black culture, and the Black Arts Movement. He died at the age of 73 on March 7, 2017 after a long battle with illness. Sengstacke was one of the city’s most prolific documentary photographers who was best known for capturing the African American experience.  Having grown up in the newspaper business (he was the grand-nephew of Robert Sengstacke Abbott, founder of the Chicago Defender), Sengstacke was able to learn from established African American photographers at a young age and had unique access to important events and people. The Visual Resources Center has had the privilege of working with Rebecca Zorach over the past 8 years to digitize over 5,900 of Sengstacke’s negatives to create Images of Black Chicago: The Robert Sengstacke Photography Archive.  Our heartfelt condolences go out to his family and friends and all who knew him.

The Chicago Defender’s obituary can be found here: Prominent Photojournalist and Former Chicago Defender Editor, Robert A. Sengstacke Dies at 73

top left: Bud Billiken Parade, c. 1967; top right: William Walker at the Painting of the Wall of Respect, 1967; bottom left: East 63th Street, c. 1966; bottom right: Opportunity Please Knock, 1967

Archivision Update: Module Eleven Now Available in Luna!

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The Visual Resources Center is pleased to announce that more than 6,300 new images are now available to the Archivision collection in the LUNA with the addition of Module Eleven! The newest update represents many new sites, including:

China: contemporary architecture including Dalian City Sport Center, Dalian International Conference Center, and Dalian Shell Museum

  • India: Taj Mahal, Devi Jagadambi Temple complex, and Secretariat in New Delhi
  • Colorado: Clyfford Still Museum and US Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel
  • Europe: Interior documentation of the Sagrada Familia, Villa Farnesina, and Saint Peter’s

The VRC subscribes to Archivision, which now contains more than 84,000 images of architecture, urban design, and public art from all over the world and all style periods. The Archivision collection in LUNA is available to all on-campus users or those with a CNetID and password. Images from Archivision can be incorporated into Media Groups and used in conjunction with images from the Art History Department Image Collection or any other content available in LUNA.

All images are available for educational use only. For publication rights or more information, please email contact@archivision.com.

MoMA Releases Digital Archive of More Than 30,000 Exhibition Images

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First MoMA Exhibition: Cézanne, Gauguin, Seurat, van Gogh, 1929

The Museum of Modern Art has released an extensive digital archive that chronicles its exhibitions from when the museum opened its doors in 1929 to today.  The archive features more than thirty-five hundred exhibitions and more than thirty-three thousand installation photographs, as well as primary documents such as press releases, checklists, catalogues, and artist lists.   MoMA said, “By making these unique resources available at no charge, the exhibition history digital archive directly aligns with the museum’s mission of encouraging an ever-deeper understanding of modern and contemporary art and fostering scholarship.” Explore the digital archive on MoMA’s website!

 

Art Institute of Chicago Announces New Alfred Stieglitz Collection Website

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The Department of Photography announced this week a new website focused on the museum’s Alfred Stieglitz photography collection. The interactive collection features high-quality reproductions of all 244 photographs in the collection gifted by his widow, Goergia O’Keefe in 1949. The majority of prints are by Stieglitz himself, but also by Ansel Adam, Julia Margaret Cameran, Paul Strand, Edward Steichen, and many others in his circle. Furthermore, the site highlights new conservation analysis, 900 images, scholarly essays, and downloadable files. Explore the site at media.artic.edu/stieglitz

The Georg Stahl Mural Collection Now Publically Available in Luna

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In the early 1970s, art historian Georg Stahl extensively researched and documented the Chicago Mural Movement. This material was used to teach a Mural Painting course at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with the late UChicago Professor Emeritus, Harold Hayden. In late 2014, Stahl graciously reached out to the Visual Resources Center and offered his material to help build our digital collections of Chicago Black Art. Over 600 slides, maps, and charts were digitized and now make up the Georg Stahl Mural Collection. Please visit http://stahl-collection.lib.uchicago.edu to browse the collection!

Public Art at the University of Chicago

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The University of Chicago has recently released a new web resource called Public Art on Campus which seeks to catalog, document, and provide contextual and critical information about the works of art on campus. There is an accompanying video which provides an overview of the works on campus. The website allows users to browse works by location, artist, and title and for selected works users can read an artist bibliography and an essay about the work. These selected works also include archival images and documents relevant to the work.

The VRC supports this project by maintaining the UChicago Public Art Collection and Archive in collaboration with the Smart Museum of Art, UChicago Arts, and Christine Mehring of the Department of Art History. This dedicated, password-protected collection is accessible to all on-campus users and off-campus users who have a CNetID and password. If you’d like to explore more, the Luna collection contains archival photographs, audio, video, conservation information, and other ephemeral documentation pertaining to the public works on campus.

Keystoning Correction in Photoshop

Keystoning occurs when the subject is not parallel with the camera lense. For example, if the camera lense is closer to the bottom of the building, it will appear much larger than the top of the building in the photograph.

before-1

1. Double the size of the canvas. Image > Canvas Size
2. Select the entire image area.
3. Edit > Transform > Skew
To rectify right angles and retain proportions do not pull top corner fully out, but only halfway out, and then pull other corner halfway in, creating a fulcrum upon the midpoint of the line.

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It may help to view the image with a grid. View > Show > Grid
4. Now crop out the superfluous two corners.

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HEADER IMAGE: COCHRANE-WOODS ART CENTER, PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID HARTT, 2015.