Category Archives: News

General Announcements of the “Hey look at this!” variety

Summer on AfterMAPH

MAPH Beach, on the northern side of Promontory Point. A popular site for recent-alumni watching, and laying in the sun like an iguana.

Summer!

The long hangover from Graduation and Reunion is beginning to subside. Thanks to everyone who made our end of the year events such a success. For those of you who couldn’t make it to Reunion, we hope to see you at the upcoming alumni happy hours at what has become the official MAPH Alumni watering hole: Clark Street Ale House. Info on dates to follow.

As far as big days in summer go, today is a big day in MAPHCentral. The class of 2012 is being added to the  MAPH and MAPH-etc lists, which means that the latest MAPH alums are being added to IRONY, the alumni list. Big.

To our newly-minted alumni (and any new students who want to get a better idea of who our alumni are), don’t forget to join several of our social networking groups. Rather than spamming alumni on Irony, messages from MAPHCentral about events and alumni news will appear only on Facebook. We will send ONE quarterly Alumni Newsletter to Irony, but if you want regular updates, be sure to do the following:

  • “Like” the MAPH Facebook Page (and while you’re at it, tell five of your friends about it! We’ll have 1600 alumni by next June, and we’d love to have as many MAPHers on the Facebook page).
  • Follow @MAPH_Alumni on Twitter
  • Join the official MAPH-only LinkedIn Group
  • Keep reading AfterMAPH for alumni profiles, tips about careers and networking, and other news from campus.

And, as always, if you have any questions or just want to check in, email me at ajaronstein@uchicago.edu. We’re working on developing even more ways for alumni and current students to work together, so stay tuned.

 

Who’s Coming to Reunion?

More of the folks who will be presenting at Reunion!

David Alm
David Alm is a New York City-based journalist and adjunct professor at Hunter College and NYU’s School for Continuing and Professional Studies. He has written for more than a dozen magazines, covering new media business, culture, and art; independent film; and his avocation, competitive distance running, for Runner’s World. He has also ghostwritten two books on new media design and digital filmmaking, respectively, for a world-renowned Web designer. From 2007 to 2010, he was the chief writer for a social issues and political blog sponsored by the fashion company Kenneth Cole Productions, covering a wide range of topics under the rubric of “raising awareness.” For that project, he also covered the Democratic and Republican National Conventions in 2008. As a professor, he has taught reporting, magazine writing, cultural criticism, the business of magazine publishing, and also several courses on film history and analysis, the humanities, and rhetoric. In addition to his writing and teaching work, he has sat on numerous panels and juries, evaluating screenplays, art, web design, and journalism for award and grant purposes. In his spare time, he trains for and travels to road races in the U.S. and abroad.
Andrew Rostan
Andrew Rostan was born in 1984 in Boardman, Ohio, the beginning of a three-hundred-and-sixty degree journey around America with a detour in Amsterdam.  After starting his bachelor’s degree in Boston and finishing it in Los Angeles (graduating summa cum laude in film from Emerson College), he worked as a script reader and bookseller before deciding to return to school.  He was accepted into the MAPH program after the six other institutions he applied to had turned him down*, and this was the best possible outcome for him, as he met so many wonderful friends and his girlfriend.  His body of work includes one filmed short screenplay and five unproduced feature-length ones, a 594-page piece of utter crap which could vaguely be described as a novel, a MAPH thesis, and An Elegy for Amelia Johnson.  He does not know what the future holds, except more reading and more graphic novels…he’s presently working on four of them.
*Andrew received his acceptance letter after being awake for 36 hours straight in Las Vegas, not to gamble and party but to see Akron/Family play a 2 a.m. concert.

Who’s Coming to Reunion?

We’re just about five weeks away from the MAPH Reunion.  To help you all get a sense of the great panels that we’re having during the afternoon, we’ll be posting bios of the MAPH alums who will be speaking in the afternoon.  Today, it’s two alums on our Writers Panel.  Remember that festivities kick off with the Director, Preceptor, and Staff Lunch–open to all alumni–at 11:30, and will continue with the “Alumni in Unexpected Places” and then “MAPH Alumni Writers” panel in the afternoon.  In the evening, we’ll be headed to English Pub and Restaurant for a party hosted by the Alumni Relations and Development office.

Early registration has been extended!  You can still sign up for all the events for only $10.

Hilary Vaughn Dobel, MAPH '09

Hilary Vaughn Dobel (MAPH 09) is a native of Seattle, Washington. She holds a BA from Princeton University, an MA in Humanities from University of Chicago, and is currently an MFA candidate in poetry and translation from Columbia University. She lives in New York City, where she runs the Writer-Translator reading series and works as an editorial intern at Parnassus: Poetry in Review. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Contrary, The Spoon River Poetry Review, and Lana Turner. Although she spends most of her time on the coasts these days, she’s thrilled to be back in Hyde Park to talk poems.

Michael Washburn, MAPH '02

Michael Washburn (MAPH ’02) is a Kentucky-born, New York-based writer. In the nearly ten years since his MAPH days, Michael has worked in the public humanities, curating programs designed to facilitate public discourse on politics, history, music, and literature. He most recently served as assistant director of the Center for the Humanities at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Prior to joining CUNY he was the assistant director of The University of Chicago’s Cultural Policy Center, and before that he was charged with faxing copies and making copies of faxes at the Illinois Humanities Council. He recently gave up all of the wealth, influence, and prestige offered by his humanities career for the greater glory of the freelance life.  Michael writes for The New York Times Book Review, The NYT Travel Section, The Washington Post, NPR, Bookforum, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Guardian, and numerous other publications. He is a frequent contributor to The Boston Globe. Michael is currently a research associate with the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and this fall he will begin teaching on book culture and the future of criticism at NYU. Michael was recently named the 2011-2012 Nonfiction Fellow at the CUNY Writers’ Institute. He’s currently procrastinating – heroically, though, very heroically – on his first book.

 

New MAPH Writers Page

In addition to the new MAPH website we have added a page to profile all the MAPH Alumni who are writing and their recent, current and upcoming projects.

If you are a MAPH alumni who has written something please let us know what you have been up to and we will happily add it to the growing list of MAPH writers.

 

 

 

New MAPH Website

The old MAPH website had been there since I applied to MAPH so we were long overdue for an update that would integrate more of the resources available for current students and alumni.

MAPH alumna Megan Austin and her husband Ricky set up the great website features. The mentors and Associate Director updated all the information about the program, and most of the photos are mine.

The new website is here. While we are all about newness, now is a great time to check out the website and let MAPH know what is new for you.   It is also a good opportunity to RSVP for the MAPH alumni events on June 3, 2011.

Can you Keep up with Adam Richardson (MAPH 97)?

MAPH Alums from the inaugural Class of 1997 have been checking in over the past week.  I’ll be talking with Adam Richardson, based in San Francisco–where he is Strategy Director for Marketing at Frog Design–tomorrow.   In what must be a copious amount of spare time, Adam blogs about design at Amphibious Blog.  This very morning, he published a short piece on Failure (no matter what you might hear, Failure is Failure) on the Harvard Business Review‘s blog.  And in the video above, find him talking about “misfits,” Space Tourism, and software at the 2010 TEDx Taipei.

(Oh, just by the way, he also wrote Innovation X: Why a Company’s Toughest Problems are Also its Greatest Advantages).

It kind of makes me want to go for a run, or do some pushups, or at least think in a sustained way about something for more than five seconds.

An Elegy for Amelia Johnson

Archaia’s beautiful edition of Andrew Rostan’s (MAPH 2010) “An Elegy for Amelia Johnson”

A quick Google search for Andrew Rostan will produce a video of the 2010 MAPH alum dominating on Jeopardy! in 2007.  But his run as one of the top 10 all-time winningest contestants is almost old news as of March 8, 2011.  Today’s the day that Rostan’s anticipated (and already well reviewed) graphic novel An Elegy for Amelia Johnson hits shelves.

Rostan is spending his AfterMAPH time working on a project that tracks the life of Anthony Trollope.  He is also employed, and working in the Rag and Bone shop of the heart in his spare time.

We at AfterMAPH congratulate Andrew on the publication of his first Graphic Novel, and look forward to more in the future.

Andrew will be reading from his work at Reunion!

Meet an Alum: Michelle Ruvolo

Michelle Ruvolo: Proof that there’s life in the Corporate World after MAPH.

Michelle Ruvolo applied directly to MAPH during her senior year of college and arrived in Hyde Park the following fall.  “I didn’t have any plans,” she recalled when we spoke on the phone last week.  Like many incoming MAPHers, Ruvolo did have a sense that the academic life was where she wanted to be after graduation.  “I thought I wanted to do a PhD and be a professor in the humanities,” she said.  But her perspective changed by the end of first quarter.

“I came to terms with the fact I wasn’t going to do a PhD,” she remembered.  “I needed to decide what skills I would need in my next life.”

As a MAPH student, Ruvolo took courses across departments—everything from Social Thought and Philosophy, to English and Math.  She completed her thesis with then-Program Director Professor Candace Vogler as her advisor, on a topic inspired by readings from Professor Arnold Davidson’s Foucault class. Continue reading

MAPH Reunion: The Fifteenth Class!

1996 Was a Very Different Time

MAPH Celebrates the graduation of its FIFTEENTH CLASS this year on Friday, June 3.  Consider the following:

In 1996, Alanis Morissette won a Grammy Award in the category of Best Record for Jagged Little PillFargo was nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards (but lost, much to the dismay of Elaine Benes, to The English Patient).  President Bill Clinton said the following in his State of the Union Address:

Our economy is the healthiest it has been in three decades. We have the lowest combined rates of unemployment and inflation in 27 years. We have created nearly 8 million new jobs, over a million of them in basic industries, like construction and automobiles. America is selling more cars than Japan for the first time since the 1970s. And for three years in a row, we have had a record number of new businesses started in our country.

And in September, a new class of around 60 of the first MAPHers came to the University of Chicago.  Continue reading

Meet an Alum: Zeke Reich

I interviewed Zeke Reich about his MAPH experience and his current position at the Veterans Administration in Washington, DC.  Here’s what he had to say:

What were your goals upon entry into MAPH?

I came into MAPH with the primary intention of connecting with a constellation of people and ideas that can be found in the U of C Philosophy Department and almost nowhere else. There were a group of professors (Conant, Finkelstein, Pippin, Haugeland, Lear…) and interlocutors (Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Cavell, Austin, Putnam, Baz, McDowell, Brandom…) whom I felt I needed to connect with in order to make my basic education as a philosophical person complete. I’m happy to say that that intention was met: I was welcomed into advanced classes and workshops, and spent time with upper-level graduate students who were having all the conversations that I had wanted to be part of. And I still feel that the U of C Wittgenstein/Cavell/Heidegger/pragmatism axis plays an extremely important role in my sensibility and worldview. Continue reading