Archive for the ‘talks’ Category

HSA Lecture Series: Greek Language and Bilingualism

Monday, March 30th, 2015

Professor Anastasia Giannakidou will be giving a lecture on Greek language and bilingualism on Wednesday, April 1st, 6:00pm in Harper 140.  Please refer to the Greek Biligualism Lecture Ad for more details.

Linguistics Guru

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Masha Polinksy will be visiting the department for two weeks beginning January 13 as this year’s linguistics guru. She will be hanging out in Itamar’s office (Rosenwald 229D). Please stop by to say hi! If you want to meet with her to discuss your research, please e-mail her (mpolinsk<AT>gmail<DOT>com) directly to schedule an appointment.

Rajesh Bhatt Installed as First Linguistics Guru

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Rajesh Bhatt from UMass will be visiting the department from May 12 to May 21 as our first linguistics guru. He will be hanging out in Anastasia’s office (Classics 314E). Please stop by to say hi! If you want to meet with him to discuss your research, please e-mail him <bhatt<AT>linguist.umass.edu> directly to schedule an appointment.

Linglunch on April 11

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Linglunch will feature two presentations on Wednesday, April 11 at noon down in the Landahl Center:

12.00 Andrea Beltrama - Italian-issimo: intensification at the semantic/pragmatics interface

12.30 Julia Thomas and Tim Grinsell – ‘Finna’ as a Socially Meaningful Quasi-Modal in African American English

Nunberg Colloquium on November 3

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Geoffrey Nunberg (School of Information, UC Berkeley) will give a colloquium talk titled “On Having a Word for It” on Thursday, November 3, 3.30 pm at the Franke Institute for the Humanities.

Abstract: What does it signify that a language “has a word for” such-and-such a notion? For the general public, it sheds light on the way its speakers think, often with political or ideological consequences. For linguists and psychologists, lexicalization chiefly bears on individual perception or cognition. For historians and other students of culture, it means a society has come into the possession of a new concept. It turns out that these perspectives rest on very different understandings of “concept” and “language”—and for that matter “have.” I’ll spell some of these out and show how there are certain misconceptions inherent in each. I want to focus in particular on the way the individualism of modern linguistics can obscure the social consequences of lexicalization, some of which have played an important role in recent philosophy of language. In general, having a word is a bigger deal than linguists generally suppose, and for reasons that linguists don’t often pay much attention to.

This talk is sponsored by the Franke Institute for the Humanities and the Department of Linguistics.