Get your MAPH Reunion Program Here!

June 1st, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Click on the cover image below to open a slideshow presentation of the Official MAPH Reunion Program.  We’re excited to see so many of you this Friday (June 3), and hope that those of you coming from afar have safe travels.

Included in the program is a welcome message from MAPHCentral, a schedule of events, bios and headshots of all of our panelists, and information regarding the location and transportation options for the evening event at English Bar and Restaurant at 444 N Lasalle Street in River North.  Please do not hesitate to contact A-J Aronstein (ajaronstein@uchicago) with any additional questions, requests, or concerns that you might have!

You can also download a printable pdf copy of the directions to English here: Directions to English.  Remember that you can reach MAPHCentral at 773-834-1201 at any point during the day in case you need more information. Program after the jump): » Read the rest of this entry «

Who’s Coming to Reunion?

May 10th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

More of the folks who will be presenting at Reunion!

David Alm
David Alm is a New York City-based journalist and adjunct professor at Hunter College and NYU’s School for Continuing and Professional Studies. He has written for more than a dozen magazines, covering new media business, culture, and art; independent film; and his avocation, competitive distance running, for Runner’s World. He has also ghostwritten two books on new media design and digital filmmaking, respectively, for a world-renowned Web designer. From 2007 to 2010, he was the chief writer for a social issues and political blog sponsored by the fashion company Kenneth Cole Productions, covering a wide range of topics under the rubric of “raising awareness.” For that project, he also covered the Democratic and Republican National Conventions in 2008. As a professor, he has taught reporting, magazine writing, cultural criticism, the business of magazine publishing, and also several courses on film history and analysis, the humanities, and rhetoric. In addition to his writing and teaching work, he has sat on numerous panels and juries, evaluating screenplays, art, web design, and journalism for award and grant purposes. In his spare time, he trains for and travels to road races in the U.S. and abroad.
Andrew Rostan
Andrew Rostan was born in 1984 in Boardman, Ohio, the beginning of a three-hundred-and-sixty degree journey around America with a detour in Amsterdam.  After starting his bachelor’s degree in Boston and finishing it in Los Angeles (graduating summa cum laude in film from Emerson College), he worked as a script reader and bookseller before deciding to return to school.  He was accepted into the MAPH program after the six other institutions he applied to had turned him down*, and this was the best possible outcome for him, as he met so many wonderful friends and his girlfriend.  His body of work includes one filmed short screenplay and five unproduced feature-length ones, a 594-page piece of utter crap which could vaguely be described as a novel, a MAPH thesis, and An Elegy for Amelia Johnson.  He does not know what the future holds, except more reading and more graphic novels…he’s presently working on four of them.
*Andrew received his acceptance letter after being awake for 36 hours straight in Las Vegas, not to gamble and party but to see Akron/Family play a 2 a.m. concert.

Who’s Coming to Reunion?

April 28th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

We’re just about five weeks away from the MAPH Reunion.  To help you all get a sense of the great panels that we’re having during the afternoon, we’ll be posting bios of the MAPH alums who will be speaking in the afternoon.  Today, it’s two alums on our Writers Panel.  Remember that festivities kick off with the Director, Preceptor, and Staff Lunch–open to all alumni–at 11:30, and will continue with the “Alumni in Unexpected Places” and then “MAPH Alumni Writers” panel in the afternoon.  In the evening, we’ll be headed to English Pub and Restaurant for a party hosted by the Alumni Relations and Development office.

Early registration has been extended!  You can still sign up for all the events for only $10.

Hilary Vaughn Dobel, MAPH '09

Hilary Vaughn Dobel (MAPH 09) is a native of Seattle, Washington. She holds a BA from Princeton University, an MA in Humanities from University of Chicago, and is currently an MFA candidate in poetry and translation from Columbia University. She lives in New York City, where she runs the Writer-Translator reading series and works as an editorial intern at Parnassus: Poetry in Review. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Contrary, The Spoon River Poetry Review, and Lana Turner. Although she spends most of her time on the coasts these days, she’s thrilled to be back in Hyde Park to talk poems.

Michael Washburn, MAPH '02

Michael Washburn (MAPH ’02) is a Kentucky-born, New York-based writer. In the nearly ten years since his MAPH days, Michael has worked in the public humanities, curating programs designed to facilitate public discourse on politics, history, music, and literature. He most recently served as assistant director of the Center for the Humanities at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Prior to joining CUNY he was the assistant director of The University of Chicago’s Cultural Policy Center, and before that he was charged with faxing copies and making copies of faxes at the Illinois Humanities Council. He recently gave up all of the wealth, influence, and prestige offered by his humanities career for the greater glory of the freelance life.  Michael writes for The New York Times Book Review, The NYT Travel Section, The Washington Post, NPR, Bookforum, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Guardian, and numerous other publications. He is a frequent contributor to The Boston Globe. Michael is currently a research associate with the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and this fall he will begin teaching on book culture and the future of criticism at NYU. Michael was recently named the 2011-2012 Nonfiction Fellow at the CUNY Writers’ Institute. He’s currently procrastinating – heroically, though, very heroically – on his first book.

 

Why MAPH?

April 21st, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Spring? Ha. Yeah. Right. Didn’t come to MAPH for the weather, that’s for sure.

Prospective students have to decide by tomorrow whether to come to MAPH.  I’ve always thought it is a useful exercise (whether you’re a current student just finishing up the first draft of your thesis, or an alum from the class of 1997) to think about the reasons why you came to MAPH in the first place.  Thinking back to my own experience, I came to MAPH frustrated by the PhD application process, pretty panicked about my life, and very disappointed about my inability to make a decision about what I wanted “next.”  MAPH settled me down and made me think clearly about what a PhD would entail (and why it might not be a good fit for me).  Here’s an excerpt from my piece “Why a Terminal Master’s?”  Full text can be found here.

What were your reasons for coming to MAPH?  Are they the same now?  MAPHCentral would love to hear your comments.

Over the course of the past year working with MAPH I have spoken with a lot of our 1500 alumni. Our graduates live around the world and work in diverse fields—everything from non-profit management to hedge fund risk management. They find jobs in development, investment banking, law, journalism, advertising and public relations, corporate finance, secondary education, and curatorial research. One alumnus ran the 2008 Obama campaign’s finances in Florida.  One is studying to be a veterinarian. Others are administrators at charter schools, English teachers, guidance counselors, and of course, professors.

We have no astronauts.  Yet.

Why has a program that focuses so tightly on the development of humanistic skills produced successful alumni in diverse fields? It can’t just be that we leave the University with a healthy understanding of the classics and wind up running creative departments at advertising agencies. Rather, the breadth of success serves as compelling evidence that graduate work in the humanities can be (don’t laugh) integral to one’s long term career satisfaction. Graduate work in the humanistic disciplines improves one’s ability to engage in most activities that characterize the professional world.

That said, no one should trivialize the financial commitment of student loans that are associated with graduate school. I certainly don’t. My loans are growing, even as I type.  And they’re not going away any time soon. But I don’t cower in fear of them, and I certainly don’t dodge my statements when they arrive. The important thing to think about when considering whether to take the plunge (ie: take out huge loans) is that any graduate work should be seen as an investment in oneself, and an opportunity for self-enrichment that will accrue benefits in the long run.

Continued at My Footpath here.

 

Meet an Alum: Steve Capone

April 1st, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Steve, living that grad student life.

I caught up with Steve Capone right before he embarked on a marathon grading session.  Steve is in the midst of finishing his coursework in the Philosophy Ph.D. program at the University of Utah (Salt Lake City) and we spent a few minutes commiserating about grading.  But  it turns out that the life of the mind–at least in the Rocky Mountains–has  some pretty great perks.  Aside from his academic pursuits, Steve skis and snowboards.  He has a season pass at Snowbird, and was planning on getting out to The Canyons Resort the day after we spoke.

“I’ve been so busy with work that I’ve probably been out there only ten days,” Steve told me.  It’s the kind of complaint that would roil the blood of any skier locked in the frigid flatness of the nation’s midsection (read, any MAPHer past or present suffering through the useless cold early spring weather).

Steve graduated from MAPH in 2007 and spent a year in his hometown of Pittsburgh, PA.  Asked to describe his gap year, Steve recalled, “I managed a bookstore and prayed that I got into a Ph.D. Program.”  Things worked out, and he is now on track to finish and defend his comprehensive paper (which Utah does in lieu of an orals exams) in the Fall.  For this paper, Steve is working on a critique of luck egalitarianism.  Though he is also working on a project related to the popular scholarship of Richard H. Thaler and Cass Sunstein (authors of Nudge), we spent the bulk of our conversation talking about luck egalitarianism, and its various critiques. » Read the rest of this entry «

Can you Keep up with Adam Richardson (MAPH 97)?

March 14th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

MAPH Alums from the inaugural Class of 1997 have been checking in over the past week.  I’ll be talking with Adam Richardson, based in San Francisco–where he is Strategy Director for Marketing at Frog Design–tomorrow.   In what must be a copious amount of spare time, Adam blogs about design at Amphibious Blog.  This very morning, he published a short piece on Failure (no matter what you might hear, Failure is Failure) on the Harvard Business Review‘s blog.  And in the video above, find him talking about “misfits,” Space Tourism, and software at the 2010 TEDx Taipei.

(Oh, just by the way, he also wrote Innovation X: Why a Company’s Toughest Problems are Also its Greatest Advantages).

It kind of makes me want to go for a run, or do some pushups, or at least think in a sustained way about something for more than five seconds.

An Elegy for Amelia Johnson

March 8th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Archaia’s beautiful edition of Andrew Rostan’s (MAPH 2010) “An Elegy for Amelia Johnson”

A quick Google search for Andrew Rostan will produce a video of the 2010 MAPH alum dominating on Jeopardy! in 2007.  But his run as one of the top 10 all-time winningest contestants is almost old news as of March 8, 2011.  Today’s the day that Rostan’s anticipated (and already well reviewed) graphic novel An Elegy for Amelia Johnson hits shelves.

Rostan is spending his AfterMAPH time working on a project that tracks the life of Anthony Trollope.  He is also employed, and working in the Rag and Bone shop of the heart in his spare time.

We at AfterMAPH congratulate Andrew on the publication of his first Graphic Novel, and look forward to more in the future.

Andrew will be reading from his work at Reunion!

Meet an Alum: Michelle Ruvolo

March 7th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Michelle Ruvolo: Proof that there’s life in the Corporate World after MAPH.

Michelle Ruvolo applied directly to MAPH during her senior year of college and arrived in Hyde Park the following fall.  “I didn’t have any plans,” she recalled when we spoke on the phone last week.  Like many incoming MAPHers, Ruvolo did have a sense that the academic life was where she wanted to be after graduation.  “I thought I wanted to do a PhD and be a professor in the humanities,” she said.  But her perspective changed by the end of first quarter.

“I came to terms with the fact I wasn’t going to do a PhD,” she remembered.  “I needed to decide what skills I would need in my next life.”

As a MAPH student, Ruvolo took courses across departments—everything from Social Thought and Philosophy, to English and Math.  She completed her thesis with then-Program Director Professor Candace Vogler as her advisor, on a topic inspired by readings from Professor Arnold Davidson’s Foucault class. » Read the rest of this entry «

Registration for the 2011 MAPH Reunion Bonanza is now Open!

March 1st, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Jacques Says: "Come to Reunion"

Are you planning on coming to Reunion?  Comment below!  Better yet, register TODAY!  We’ll keep track of how many people are signed up and will let you know.

If you haven’t RSVP’s on the Official MAPH Facebook Page yet, get on board!  For more ways to get connected to the Program and Hyde Park, check the previous post on Official MAPH Social Networks.

Keep an eye out for new alumni profiles (we’ll be publishing more of them as we get closer to June 3), and if you have any questions, email ajaronstein@uchicago.edu.

The MAPHia: Resources for Alumni

February 24th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Tell me he doesn’t look like a MAPH dude. He does.

MAPH will have almost 1500 alumni by the end of this year.  Many of you are in Chicago, but we have alums in London, Singapore, China, India, Australia, and other faraway sounding places.  You are professors, non-profit fundraisers, curators, art gallery directors, program coordinators for corporate giving, heads of communications, attorneys, investment bankers, teachers, and independent consultants.  You work in government, education, finance, journalism, the arts, advocacy organizations, publishing, and any number of other fields.

Finding everyone is a bit like herding cats.  Cats educated in psychoanalytic theory.  In other words very, very strange, unnervingly smart cats.

And we would love for you all to check in.  Here are several easy ways that we’re hoping you can plug yourself back into MAPH:

  • Join the official MAPH Facebook Group “Master of Arts Program in the Humanities.”  This is the central clearing house for all announcements from MAPHCentral.  You can find our blog content, events announcements, and reunion updates!
  • Check out the AfterMAPH blog (which you’re already doing), and volunteer to be interviewed for the “Meet an Alum” feature.  We love talking with you, and our current students and alums all love reading profiles of interesting people.
  • Join the MAPH LinkedIn Group.  Whether your searching for a job, or are just interested in staying connected, LinkedIn is still popular among MAPHers and we’d love to keep it that way.  CAPS is great, but the best resource for you (and for our current students) will be the growing alumni network.
  • Twitter.  Yes, we have it.  Right now, you can follow @MAPHMentors, but we will start up a new @AfterMAPH alumni feed soon.
  • COME TO WINTER the WINTER QUARTER MAPH ALUMNI MEETUP.  Clark Street Ale House on March 3 at 6:00 until whenever.  MAPH will pony up for the first round.
  • COME TO REUNION.  It’s on June 3, and it’s going to be awesome.

You can always email me at MAPHCentral (ajaronstein@uchicago.edu) if you have questions or just want to check in.