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Medieval Manuscripts Alive

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The Getty’s online magazine The Getty Iris has launched the series Medieval Manuscripts Alive, which features expert speakers reading the languages of the Middle Ages from centuries-old books. It aims to bring the manuscripts’ accompanying illuminations to life through sound.  Each reading is accompanied by a translation into English and a brief description of the relationship between the text and image. In collaboration with the British Library’s Language & Literature audio collection, the Getty’s manuscripts collection will soon be heard in 15 languages, including Coptic, Ge’ez, Arabic and more.

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Mackintosh Architecture: Context, Making, and Meaning

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Recently, the University of Glasgow announced the launch of a new website cataloging all known architectural projects of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the Scottish architect, designer, and painter.  Additionally, “the site also provides entries for projects by the practice, John Honeyman & Keppie / Honeyman, Keppie & Mackintosh during the Mackintosh years 1889–1913; images and data from the office record books; a catalogue raisonné of over 1200 drawings by Mackintosh and the practice; analytical and contextual essays; biographies of over 400 clients, colleagues, contractors and suppliers; timeline; glossary; and bibliography.”

For anyone doing research on Mackintosh, this site is a treasure trove of digitized archival documents, photographs, and even job books kept by the firm founded by Honeyman. There are also essays on Mackintosh, an interactive map related to his work, a glossary, and very thorough bibliography.

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New VRC Digital Camera Lending Program

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Looking for a digital camera to use on campus? The VRC will now be lending its Canon Rebel T1i to Art History students and faculty! The camera can be checked out for single day on-campus use and a brief orientation will be given to first-timers. To make a reservation, please contact visualresources@uchicago.edu.

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Object:Photo


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The Museum of Modern Art recently launched Object:Photo, an amazing website focused on the Thomas Walther Collection. Composed of 341 photographs, the Walther Collection entered the museum in 2001. In 2010, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation gave the museum a substantial grant to research and preserve the photographs. The website is a direct result of this four-year research project. In the words of Glenn D. Lowry, the Museum of Modern Art’s director, the website “is unprecedented in its functionality, providing virtual access to the objects in exceptional depth, along with wide-ranging scholarship on the photographs’ historical context and significance.”

In addition to scans of the photographs themselves, there are scholarly essays, a section on the scientific analysis of the photographs, and most interestingly, a section called “Visualizations,” that presents interactive maps and timelines allowing viewers to easily connect photographers, see where they worked and exhibited, who they interacted with, and even compare photographs by attribute, subject, or style.

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Vintage Ads from the New York Times and Duke

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The New York Times has recently released a collection of ads from the 1960s and they’re crowdsourcing the data for the images. Eventually, other decades will be released. The project is called Madison and if you’re interested in participating, check out the link here to start tagging! You’ll be asked to find or identify ads on the page, tag ads, or transcribe ads.

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Another great digital collection of vintage ads is Duke University’s Ad*Access, which contains more than 7,000 ads from the US and Canada between 1911 and 1955. Their digital collection is fully cataloged, so you won’t have to do any of the legwork yourself! You can browse across many different categories including product, company, publication, date, subject, headline, and audience.

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Photoshop Actions

Are you spending too much time with repetitive tasks in Photoshop? Photoshop actions enable you to record a process and save that information as an action which you can then use for other tasks down the road. Not only that, you can edit actions after the fact and customize them to suit your needs.

While you can make an unlimited amount of actions, including color correction, below is an example of how to resize images ideal for Powerpoint. Take some time to plan the steps of the actions before recording.

1. Select “New Action” from the bottom right of the Actions window. Title the action and click “Record.”

 

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2. To resize the image, go to the Image menu and select Image Size. Change the resolution to 150dpi.

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3. Now SAVE AS a JPEG to a specific location on your computer.

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4. Finally, click the “Stop” button at the bottom left of the Actions window. You can now use this action on individual images by pressing the “Play” button or Batch Process an entire folder.

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The Robert Frank Collection Online at the National Gallery of Art

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The Robert Frank Collection at the National Gallery of Art is the largest repository of materials related to renowned photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank. Spanning Frank’s career from 1937 to 2005, the collection includes vintage and later prints, contact sheets, work prints, negatives, three bound books of original photographs, technical material, and various papers, books, and recordings.

For a complete account of photographs, contact sheets, and work prints in the collection, see Robert Frank photographs, contact sheets, and work prints in the collection. The spreadsheet lists subjects photographed by Frank, in chronological order, along with the corresponding number of photographs, contact sheets, and work prints in the collection and the accession number of each object.

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The Classicizing Chicago Project

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The Classicizing Chicago Project from Northwestern University brings together several different datasets and scholarly essays about Classical antiquity and its pervasiveness throughout the city of Chicago. The datasets include theater, architecture, and education, and the website also features supplementary images. The architecture dataset provides robust information about each building represented and links to related images. This is a great resource for examples of Classical revival architecture in Chicago including sites such as museums, skyscrapers, churches, high schools, and houses.

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Saving Images in LUNA

For Saving Single Images in LUNA:

  • Once you find an image you want to save, click on the thumbnail. This will give you a larger-sized image with cataloging information.
  • Click on “Export” button in the upper right corner.
  • If the image is going to be displayed in PowerPoint, select the size closest to 1536 pixels.
  • Save the file to a specified location.
  • Unzip the downloaded file. The image is inside the folder and can be dropped into PowerPoint at this point.

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To Save a Group of Images in LUNA and Export to PowerPoint:

  • Either open a media group or create a new one. For information on media groups, see LUNA’s video tutorial here.
  • Once the media group contains all the images you want, in the order you want, click on the “Export to PowerPoint” button.
  • This will bundle the set, open PowerPoint, and populate a new slideshow with both images and cataloging data.

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Dartmouth Digital Orozco

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José Clemente Orozco’s The Epic of American Civilization mural cycle at Dartmouth College’s Baker-Berry Library is virtually represented in the Dartmouth Digital Orozco.

The Dartmouth Digital Orozco project allows users to pan and zoom through the 24 panels of the mural cycle as they exist in the library. If you click anywhere on the mural, a lightbox of related images will open. Dartmouth has a wealth of supplementary images including more than hundred preparatory drawings and historical photographs of the mural. You also overlay supplementary images on top of the mural to see how preparatory drawings relate by adjusting the transparency of the overlay.

The VRC has been building a collection of Mexican mural paintings, so if you’d like to explore our images, login to Luna and search for Mexican muralist.

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