Posts RSS Comments RSS

Archive for the 'Modern – Contemporary' Category

Visit “Lost Murals of Chicago” in the Vamonde App

IMG_2538 (1)

Vamonde is a recently launched urban story telling app that uses curated content and GPS to connect users to significant places.

Rebecca Zorach, a professor of art history at Northwestern University created a module in Vamonde called “Lost Murals of Chicago” in which she takes app users to 8 murals in Chicago and provides information about the artists, how the murals were created, and other signifiant facts about the mural site. Vamonde provides a map with GPS walking directions from a user’s location to the mural site.

Check out the Vamonde app to go on your own walking tour of “Lost Murals of Chicago” or other tours on the app. Right now the app only features content from Chicago, and other tours such as “The Inside Track: Art on CTA” and “Humboldt Park: Jens Jensen’s Experimental Grounds” might be of interest. Vamonde is currently only available at the iTunes App Store and requires users to sign up for a free account.

For more images and information about the community mural movement in Chicago, visit the Public Art Workshop Mural Archive hosted by the VRC in Luna.

Comments Off on Visit “Lost Murals of Chicago” in the Vamonde App

Mackintosh Architecture: Context, Making, and Meaning

1B1-MCR-3-A14

Recently, the University of Glasgow announced the launch of a new website cataloging all known architectural projects of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the Scottish architect, designer, and painter.  Additionally, “the site also provides entries for projects by the practice, John Honeyman & Keppie / Honeyman, Keppie & Mackintosh during the Mackintosh years 1889–1913; images and data from the office record books; a catalogue raisonné of over 1200 drawings by Mackintosh and the practice; analytical and contextual essays; biographies of over 400 clients, colleagues, contractors and suppliers; timeline; glossary; and bibliography.”

For anyone doing research on Mackintosh, this site is a treasure trove of digitized archival documents, photographs, and even job books kept by the firm founded by Honeyman. There are also essays on Mackintosh, an interactive map related to his work, a glossary, and very thorough bibliography.

Comments Off on Mackintosh Architecture: Context, Making, and Meaning

Record Sales at Christie’s

elvis-1

Christie’s Auction House brought in the highest total for an auction in history last night, grossing $852.9 million at the contemporary sale in New York.  New records were also set for 11 artists, among them Cy Twombly, Ed Ruscha, Peter Doig, Martin Klippenberger, and Seth Price. The stars of the night were Andy Warhol’s Triple Elvis [Ferus Type](1960) and Four Marlons (1966), which sold early going for $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively.  “By the time the second figure was reached, the crowd—whether reeling from the action or no longer capable of being surprised or just no longer impressed by anything under $80 million—forgot to clap,” says Dan Duray from ArtNews. Although the prior nights’ Sotheby’s sale was a disappointment bringing in only $343.6 million, the two weeks of sales at both auction houses took in a total of some $2 billion, comforting many that the art market is alive and kicking.

Comments Off on Record Sales at Christie’s

Access to 15,000+ Comics at the Digital Comic Museum

dcm

The Digital Comic Museum has digitized more than 15,000 comic books from the Golden Age of comics, or in the years before 1959. The DCM has a forum for users to submit historical research and commentary on the comics. While you won’t find any Marvel superheroes here, there’s a wide variety of themes within the comic world, including romance, Westerns, combat, crime, supernatural, and horror. Users have to create an account to download images.

Check out the Digital Comic Museum for more information and to download images.

Via Open Culture.

Comments Off on Access to 15,000+ Comics at the Digital Comic Museum

New Online Resource: “This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession”

nyarc_klimt

The New York Art Resources (NYARC)—a collaboration between the libraries of the Frick Collection, Brooklyn Museum, and the Museum of Modern Art recently launched a new online resource called This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession.

The website presents the complete catalogs of the Vienna Secession (1898–1905), twenty digitized postcards of exhibition installations, and posters, along with related artworks. The website also features a related bibliography and a timeline of events pertaining to the Vienna Secession.

To learn more, check out This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession.

Comments Off on New Online Resource: “This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession”

Stanford and the BNF Release 14,000 Images of the French Revolution

frda

Stanford University and the Bibliothèque nationale de France have partnered on the French Revolution Digital Archive, a collection of more than 14,000 high-resolution images. The archive has two areas of content, including Images, which contains about 12,000 individual images of prints, illustrations, medals, coins, and other objects. The section on Parliamentary Archives contains primary source documents arranged chronologically. Users can browse by date or subject, and search both the Images and Parliamentary Archives sections at once or individually. The project also contains an excellent timeline of the Revolution.

For more information, check out the French Revolution Digital Archive!

Via Hyperallergic

Comments Off on Stanford and the BNF Release 14,000 Images of the French Revolution

Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Makes Gift of Shunk and Kender Archives

rlf_photoarchives

The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation recently announced that it is donating nearly 200,000 items from the Harry Shunk and Shunk-Kender Archives to five international institutions. The archival materials include black-and-white prints, color prints, negatives, contact sheets, and color transparencies, and will be distributed to the Getty Research Institute, the Museum of the Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Centre Pompidou, and the Tate. The Foundation’s gift marks the first time an artist’s foundation has devoted its resources to the work of other artists.

Harry Shunk (1924–2006, born in Germany) and János [Jean] Kender (1937–2009, born in Hungary) made the bulk of their images from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, documenting more than 400 artists in their studios, at openings, and during performances, making this collection an important documentary collection of the modern art and art history. Artists depicted include Roy Lichtenstein, Vito Acconci, Joseph Beuys, Alexander Calder, Eva Hesse, Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Man Ray, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol among many others.

After Shunk died in 2006, the Foundation began acquiring the archive by purchase between 2008 and 2012. After acquiring the images, the Foundation “preserved, cataloged, and digitized the images” and made them available in an online collection on their website. You can view the archive’s list of artists to view PDFs of thumbnails that depict that specific artist. For information about using the images in scholarly publications, contact Shunk-Copyright@lichtensteinfoundation.org.

For more information or to check out the collection, visit the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Photography Archives.

Via ArtDaily.

Comments Off on Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Makes Gift of Shunk and Kender Archives

Contemporary Artists Index

cia_cai

The Cleveland Institute of Art recently redesigned and improved the functionality of the Contemporary Artists Index, a fantastic resource that documents artists, artist groups, photographers, craftspeople, designers, and design firms. The Index now contains more than 31,000 artists appearing in more than 1,800 exhibition catalogs and art publications.

Comments Off on Contemporary Artists Index

South Side Community Art Center Now Publicly Available in LUNA

sscacluna

Over the summer, the VRC announced that images of artworks held by the South Side Community Art Center were newly added to our LUNA database. We’re now thrilled to announce that the collection has been made publicly available in LUNA, so anyone can access the more than 350 images!

To view the collection, click here. For more information, see our previous post about the SSCAC’s collection.

 

Comments Off on South Side Community Art Center Now Publicly Available in LUNA

Imaging the Imagists at the Smart Museum

barbararossismartsearch

The Smart Museum of Art received a grant from the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation to greatly expand access and preservation of its collection of Chicago Imagist works on paper. The Smart was able to mount, conserve, and/or photograph 437 works, add 407 new images to their online collections database, expand 51 artwork texts (which can be now viewed in the online catalog records) and interview 3 artists.

The interviews with artists Barbara Rossi, Suellen Rocca, and Karl Wirsum are available online through the Smart’s Vimeo channel (and also on an iPad in the Joan and Robert Feitler Gallery for Contemporary Art through August 2014).

To view the newly added images in the Smart’s collections website, the best way to search is by artist name. After completing the grant work, the following Imagist artists are represented on their website:

Roger Brown, Art Green, Philip Hanson, Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, Ed Paschke, Suellen Rocca, Barbara Rossi, Karl Wirsum, Don Baum, and the Hairy Who.

If you’re in the area, be sure to visit the current exhibition at the Smart, State of Mind and sister show Bridging California and Chicago which features Chicago Imagist works.

Comments Off on Imaging the Imagists at the Smart Museum

Older Entries »