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Medieval Manuscripts Alive

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The Getty’s online magazine The Getty Iris has launched the series Medieval Manuscripts Alive, which features expert speakers reading the languages of the Middle Ages from centuries-old books. It aims to bring the manuscripts’ accompanying illuminations to life through sound.  Each reading is accompanied by a translation into English and a brief description of the relationship between the text and image. In collaboration with the British Library’s Language & Literature audio collection, the Getty’s manuscripts collection will soon be heard in 15 languages, including Coptic, Ge’ez, Arabic and more.

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Mackintosh Architecture: Context, Making, and Meaning

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Recently, the University of Glasgow announced the launch of a new website cataloging all known architectural projects of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the Scottish architect, designer, and painter.  Additionally, “the site also provides entries for projects by the practice, John Honeyman & Keppie / Honeyman, Keppie & Mackintosh during the Mackintosh years 1889–1913; images and data from the office record books; a catalogue raisonné of over 1200 drawings by Mackintosh and the practice; analytical and contextual essays; biographies of over 400 clients, colleagues, contractors and suppliers; timeline; glossary; and bibliography.”

For anyone doing research on Mackintosh, this site is a treasure trove of digitized archival documents, photographs, and even job books kept by the firm founded by Honeyman. There are also essays on Mackintosh, an interactive map related to his work, a glossary, and very thorough bibliography.

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Record Sales at Christie’s

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Christie’s Auction House brought in the highest total for an auction in history last night, grossing $852.9 million at the contemporary sale in New York.  New records were also set for 11 artists, among them Cy Twombly, Ed Ruscha, Peter Doig, Martin Klippenberger, and Seth Price. The stars of the night were Andy Warhol’s Triple Elvis [Ferus Type](1960) and Four Marlons (1966), which sold early going for $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively.  “By the time the second figure was reached, the crowd—whether reeling from the action or no longer capable of being surprised or just no longer impressed by anything under $80 million—forgot to clap,” says Dan Duray from ArtNews. Although the prior nights’ Sotheby’s sale was a disappointment bringing in only $343.6 million, the two weeks of sales at both auction houses took in a total of some $2 billion, comforting many that the art market is alive and kicking.

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Open House Chicago This Weekend, October 18-19

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Don’t miss the Chicago Architecture Foundation’s fourth annual Open House Chicago, a free public festival that offers behind-the-scenes access to 150 buildings across Chicago. Explore repurposed mansions, hidden rooms, sacred spaces, private clubs, iconic theaters, hotels and more.  Highlights include an airstream trailer on top of a roof between the Montrose and Damen Brown Line stations, a meticulously restored Frank Lloyd Wright home in Rogers Park, and a former meatpacking warehouse turned vertical urban farm.

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Simpson Islamic Manuscript Record Archive Online at University of Michigan

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The Visual Resources Collections at the University of Michigan just announced that the Simpson Islamic Manuscript Record Archive is available online. They write, “Dr. Simpson served as Curator of Islamic Near Eastern Art at the Freer/Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Curator of Islamic Art at the Walters Art Museum, and Visiting Professor at the University of Michigan (2005).”

The website for the Simpson Islamic Manuscript Record Archive contains more than 500 documentation records and approximately 4,800 images (in a variety of media including prints, color slides, digital images, and microfilm). The Simpson Archive “is organized by repository name and manuscript accession number or shelf mark (for example, “British Library Add. 7622”)” and each record contains robust cataloging information about the manuscript.

This collection is related to the Islamic Art Archives at the University of Michigan, which has more than 900 digitized manuscripts available in HathiTrust.

 

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e-Museum of Japan

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Looking for images of works of art in the National Museums of Japan? This e-Museum collection of “National Treasures & Important Cultural Properties” contains hundreds of high quality reproductions, robust metadata, and descriptive content. Users can zoom and and pan through images, browse by categories including painting, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture, textiles, ceramics, and more. The site features a keyword and an advanced search.

In addition, iPhone and Android apps exist for the e-Museum collection.

For more information, explore the e-Museum of Japan!

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Access to 15,000+ Comics at the Digital Comic Museum

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The Digital Comic Museum has digitized more than 15,000 comic books from the Golden Age of comics, or in the years before 1959. The DCM has a forum for users to submit historical research and commentary on the comics. While you won’t find any Marvel superheroes here, there’s a wide variety of themes within the comic world, including romance, Westerns, combat, crime, supernatural, and horror. Users have to create an account to download images.

Check out the Digital Comic Museum for more information and to download images.

Via Open Culture.

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New Online Resource: “This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession”

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The New York Art Resources (NYARC)—a collaboration between the libraries of the Frick Collection, Brooklyn Museum, and the Museum of Modern Art recently launched a new online resource called This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession.

The website presents the complete catalogs of the Vienna Secession (1898–1905), twenty digitized postcards of exhibition installations, and posters, along with related artworks. The website also features a related bibliography and a timeline of events pertaining to the Vienna Secession.

To learn more, check out This Kiss to the Whole World: Klimt and the Vienna Secession.

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Stanford and the BNF Release 14,000 Images of the French Revolution

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Stanford University and the Bibliothèque nationale de France have partnered on the French Revolution Digital Archive, a collection of more than 14,000 high-resolution images. The archive has two areas of content, including Images, which contains about 12,000 individual images of prints, illustrations, medals, coins, and other objects. The section on Parliamentary Archives contains primary source documents arranged chronologically. Users can browse by date or subject, and search both the Images and Parliamentary Archives sections at once or individually. The project also contains an excellent timeline of the Revolution.

For more information, check out the French Revolution Digital Archive!

Via Hyperallergic

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Archnet Releases New Website

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MIT’s Archnet, a collaboration between the Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT Libraries, “is a portal to rich and unique scholarly resources featuring thousands of sites, publications, images, and more focused on architecture, urbanism, environmental and landscape design, visual culture, and conservation issues related to the Muslim world.” The website has recently been remained and restructured since its launch ten years ago.

The website features a timeline, a wide variety of digital collections and research materials, an advanced search, and selected syllabi pertaining to the study of Islamic Art, Architecture, and Culture.

To explore for yourself, check out Archnet!

 

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