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CALL FOR PAPERS
AAUSC Volume 2010

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Editors:
Glenn S. Levine, University of California, Irvine
Alison Phipps, University of Glasgow

Series Editor:
Carl Blyth, University of Texas at Austin

1. Title
Critical and Intercultural Theory and Language Pedagogy

2. Scope and Focus
Critical theory, cultural studies, postmodernity as a label for today’s world, and postmodernism as an intellectual movement have come to mean many things to diverse academic fields of inquiry and different sectors of society. Yet many of those who study and teach languages in the North American context have largely ignored crucial theoretical issues that have been taken up in a wide range of fields, from literary studies to anthropology to management. And on the “other side of the fence,” those in literary and cultural studies often have viewed what happens in language classrooms as irrelevant to the intellectual work of the academy. This dilemma was recently fleshed out in the MLA ad hoc committee report, “Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World” (http://www.mla.org/flreport); language departments and professionals were challenged to find new ways to bridge the gap between conventional language instruction and more advanced ‘content’ courses, to better integrate and articulate language instruction with the goals and mission of a liberal arts education, and to pursue new ways for language instruction at all levels to contribute to students’ development as global citizens.

To foster this important endeavor, the goal of the volume is to explore the role of language teaching and learning in a postmodern world and the ways that literary theory, critical theory, social theory, cultural theory, and other theories, can or already do contribute to our thinking about curriculum, teacher training, and language teaching and learning. The volume should inform language program directors and instructors about these theories, as well as provide fuel for discussion and debate in language departments as they work toward addressing and implementing proposals put forth in the MLA Report. The volume thus seeks to bridge the language-literature/culture divide that is still the reality of many language departments. The group of projected contributors, who come from diverse fields within and outside of applied linguistics and SLA, represents a new direction for the AAUSC series. The twofold purpose is to provide a forum for those scholars to weigh in on issues of second-language teaching and learning, and to foster a dialogue among scholars from many fields who are concerned with critical issues of language, learning, and education.

With regard to the place of theory in language pedagogy, the volume aims to bring theoretical debates center stage for language professionals and to tackle the suspicion in which theorists are thought to hold practitioners and in which practitioners are thought to hold theorists. The editors take the view that for new forms of belonging to be imagined for our plurilingual times, and for political questions of language to truly inform language practice, then theories are needed which are strong enough to bear the weight of collective and individual self-reflection. There is, in language studies, an urgent need for thinking which may bring about a new consciousness of the import, place and incontestable profundity of the activity-practical and engaged-of language learning. Indeed, it is the editors’ view that much of the theory developed over the last few decades in the humanities and social sciences has overshot the political and practical realities of classrooms and language learning practices. This volume, then, seeks to think about the fundamental textures of shared intercultural experience in teaching and learning languages. Without such a focus, then language pedagogy risks being left with little to say, and little conceptual novelty with which to say it, when faced with the profound questions raised by the politics of our current age.

3. Suggestions for Possible Topics
Manuscript proposals are welcome that consider any aspect of how theory can, should, or does relate to, inform or impact language curriculum, program direction, teacher training, or teaching practice. The intended readership includes language program directors and coordinators, basic language instructors, and language department faculty at large. Though we envision most contributions to be in essay form, we also welcome empirical research reports exploring connections between theory and issues of language teaching and learning. The focus may be as broad or narrow as the author(s) choose; they can deal with broad concepts or with specific features or aspects of language, culture, teaching, learning, etc. Specific questions of interest include but are not restricted to the following:

* Theory and theories
o An accessible ‘introduction’ to a specific theoretical framework in terms of its relevance for language education and/or language program design and direction
o How do specific theories (e.g., social theory, critical theory, sociocultural theory, cultural theory, complexity theory) relate to or inform particular aspects of language curriculum and teaching?
o How can language program directors and language teachers best make use of or ‘apply’ theory in designing curricula and teaching?

* Postmodernism and postmodernity, and preparing global citizens through language education
o Investigations/interrogations of issues of race, gender, class, postcolonialism etc. as these relate to collegiate language education
o Issues of globalization and language education
o Critical pedagogy and/or contribution of collegiate language instruction to social change
o Transcultural communication and intercultural communicative competence as a vehicle and goal for collegiate language education
o Language socialization and literacy perspectives

Whatever the specific focus, each contribution should address in concrete terms the implications or applications of particular theories for language program directors and language teachers, and ideally, each should also speak to scholars working in the author’s field of inquiry, highlighting what they could learn from issues and aspects of language teaching and learning.

4. Timeline
Interested parties should submit abstracts to both editors by May 1, 2009. Potential contributors will receive feedback through a blind peer-review process by June 1, 2009. All manuscript submissions will also be blind peer-reviewed.

The deadline for full-length manuscripts is September 15, 2009, and final revisions will be due by March 15, 2010. Please note that the deadlines for full- length manuscripts and final revisions may be subject to change. The volume will appear in November, 2010 at the annual AAUSC meeting held in conjunction with the MLA Convention.

Please direct inquiries to Glenn S. Levine (glevine@uci.edu) or Alison Phipps (A.Phipps@educ.gla.ac.uk).

LANGUAGE LECTORS — HINDI, TAMIL
Multi-year appointments with the South Asian Studies Council, The MacMillan Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

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Yale seeks two full-time Lectors in South Asian Languages beginning July 1, 2009, each for a three year term, renewable. Primary duties include teaching five courses per year including elementary (2 courses) and intermediate (2 courses) in the target language (Hindi or Tamil) in four learning-skill areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The fifth course will focus on literary, social, political, cultural and/or sociolinguistic topics related to the target language (as determined on the basis of the appointee’s qualifications and expertise). The Lector will advise students and participate in program building of South Asian Studies at Yale, specifically, in developing overseas language and other study opportunities. He/She will also engage in developing the broad curriculum and the pedagogic materials for the target language.

Applicants must have: 1) native or near-native fluency in the target language (Hindi or Tamil); 2) strong English communication skills; 3) experience in teaching the target language as a second language in a college or university environment; 4) an M.A. or other advanced degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. South Asian languages, literature, linguistics); 5) demonstrated ability and enthusiasm for in-class language instruction. Further desirable characteristics include some expertise in second-language teaching/acquisition, knowledge of overseas language and related study sites, experience with technologically-aided language learning methods and their development, interest in the broader field of South Asian Studies and/or other relevant disciplines. Salary is commensurate with experience and background.

Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2008, and continue until both positions are filled. Please send your application letter, curriculum vita, and three letters of recommendation to Chair, South Asian Studies Council, Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue, P.O. Box 208206, New Haven, CT  06520, U.S.A. Please clearly indicate on the envelope whether the application is for the Hindi or the Tamil position.  Submissions by email to Barbara.Papacoda@yale.edu will be accepted only if properly identified with full title, institution, and contact information of the sender. Yale University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer; applications from women and minorities are encouraged.

SASLI – Summer 2009

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The South Asia Summer Language Institute (SASLI) is now accepting applications for Summer 2009.

Applications and instructions can be found on the SASLI website at http://sasli.wisc.edu/apply.htm

Please apply as soon as possible as faculty hiring is based on student interest.

Questions about SASLI and the application process are addressed on the FAQ pages on the web site at http://sasli.wisc.edu/faq/index.html. Additional questions can be addressed to Grace Lorentz, SASLI Program  Assistant at (608) 261-1194 or sasli@southasia.wisc.edu

National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages
12th International Conference
Venue: Sheraton Madison Hotel, Madison, Wisconsin
April 23 – 26, 2009

NB* Due to popular request, the deadline for receipt of proposals has been extended to Friday, December 5th, 2008. This extension is FINAL.

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The Twelfth Annual Meeting of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages (NCOLCTL) is scheduled for April 23-26, 2009, in Madison, WI (with a pre-conference workshop scheduled for Thursday, April 23rd). Proposals are solicited for individual papers, colloquia, and poster sessions. Proposals should fall broadly within the conference theme, “Towards a New Paradigm in the LCTLs.” Presentations may address new paradigms in language pedagogy – such as curriculum, methodology, and material development, or new paradigms in advocacy and administration – such as bilingual education, heritage language learners, autonomous and self-instructional settings, teacher training, professionalization, and program development, These paradigms will undoubtedly overlap and successful proposals will reflect the interrelatedness of pedagogy and program administration in the future of LCTLs. Although proposed presentations may focus on individual languages, they should address issues that clearly relate to more than just that one language.

Individual papers are to be 20 minutes long. A paper should focus clearly on issues related to the main conference theme. Papers may be based on research or practical experience. Colloquia are to be 90 minutes long. A colloquium proposal should specify three or more presenters who will address the conference theme. Preference will be given to colloquia that cut across different languages or language groups. Poster and presentation sessions may focus on completed work or work in progress related to the teaching and/or learning of less commonly taught languages. They may be in either the traditional poster format, such as presentation of materials or of research completed or in progress, or demonstrations of instructional or information technology.

Proposals may ONLY be submitted in electronic format using the attached NCOLCTL Session Proposal Submission Form. This form is also available at the NCOLCTL website (http://www.councilnet.org/conf/conf2009/prpsl.htm). The Proposal Submission form is a “fillable” PDF file that can be completed with Adobe(r) Acrobat(r) or Reader(r) and then submitted to NCOLCTL via e-mail. This is the only format in which Proposals may be submitted. The form contains detailed instructions for its use, but please contact the NCOLCTL Secretariat (ncolctl@mailplus.wisc.edu) with any questions. For a proposal to be considered, all fields of the form, including, title, abstract, proposal, type of session, technology needs and contact information must be completed in full. Incomplete proposals may be disqualified.

Due to popular request, the deadline for receipt of proposals has been extended to Friday, December 5th, 2008. Applicants will be notified by the Program Committee by Monday, January 5th, 2009 whether or not their proposal has been accepted. At least one presenter from an accepted presentation will be required to pre-register. Details about pre-registration will be provided in the acceptance notification.

If you have any questions regarding Proposal submission, please contact the NCOLCTL Secretariat at:

ncolctl@mailplus.wisc.edu
NCOLCTL
4231 HumanitiesBuilding
455 N. Park Street
Madison, WI 53706

Tel: 608-265-7902; FAX 608 265 7904

The South Asia Summer Language Institute in Madison, Wisconsin, is now hiring both Lecturers and Faculty Assistants for Summer 2009.

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Positions are available in Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Pashto, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sinhala, Tamil, Tibetan and Urdu. Instructors are strongly encouraged to apply for positions teaching the newly offered languages of Pashto and Punjabi.

The position vacancy listings are posted on the University of Wisconsin’s Office of Human Resources Web site. Details about how to apply, eligibility, etc. are included in the listings. Additional questions may be addressed to SASLI by phone at 608-261-1194 or by e-mail at sasli.wisc.edu.

Link to the listing for the lecturer positions (PVL #60684)
http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/pvl/pv_060684.html

Link to the listing for the faculty assistant positions (PVL #60686) http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/pvl/pv_060686.html

The Yale Center for Language Study seeks qualified applicants for the position of Associate Director for Language Education and Research. Duties include: assess pedagogical needs across departments and programs; create a comprehensive model for professional development of language faculty, focusing on instructional innovation and research; oversee a team of faculty liaisons; identify new directions in language study, innovative models of instruction, and interdisciplinary programs. Candidates must have a Ph.D. or equivalent level degree in second language acquisition, (applied) linguistics, or related field and three or more years experience in  program administration. ABD candidates will be considered.

Review of applications will begin December 1, 2008.  Candidates who wish to be considered for this position must apply online at www.Yale.edu/jobs <http://www.Yale.edu/jobs> – the STARS req ID for this position is 6073 BR. Candidates must also send three (3) professional references to: Search Committee, Yale University, Center for Language Study, P.O. Box 208349, New Haven, CT 06520-8349 (e-mail: clssearch@yale.edu).

/Yale// University// is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. Yale values diversity in its faculty, staff, and students and strongly encourages applications from women and members of underrepresented minority groups.**/

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
International Programs and Studies/Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

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Visiting Program Coordinator
12 month 100% position
SEARCH EXTENDED

Primary Function: The Visiting Program Coordinator will assume a primary role in planning and preparing an application for a new US/ED Title VI Area Studies National Resource Center (NRC) in South Asian Studies at the University of Illinois.   Some domestic travel will be required.

Duties and Responsibilities:
• Assist the Director of the South Asian Initiative in preparing the Title VI application for an NRC in South Asian Studies. This will include researching, cataloging, and developing a database of South Asian resources and faculty on campus; assisting in the preparation and writing of the Title VI and other grant applications.
• Coordinate existing and new programmatic activities focused on South Asia both on and off campus, such as visiting speakers, colloquia, conferences, and jointly planned activities with other campus units and organizations, as well as workshops for business and professional groups.
• Coordinate activities with partner institutions; and liaision with multiple campus organizations
• Develop and support programmatic activities on South Asia at the University of Illinois and may involve logistical planning for conferences, symposia, visiting speakers and workshops.
• Perform other tasks and duties as assigned.

Organizational Relationship: The Visiting Program Coordinator will report to the Director of the Center for South Asian and Middle East Studies (CSAMES) and the Director of the South Asian Initiative. S/he will work with other Area Center Associate Directors and Outreach Coordinators.

Qualifications:
Required Education, Experience and Abilities:
• Bachelors degree in a social science or humanities field, preferably in South Asian studies
• Familiarity with handling databases and writing reports is considered a strong asset.
• Excellent English writing and speaking skills
• Strong organizational ability
• Creative and interdisciplinary orientation
• Excellent computer skills
Desired Experience:
• Master’s degree, in a social science or humanities field, preferably in South Asian studies
• Knowledge of a South Asian language.
• Experience in grant-writing and U.S. federal grant programs

Salary: Commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Starting Date: ASAP after close date.

Closing Date: In order to ensure full consideration, a letter of interest, resume including email address, short writing sample, and three letters of recommendation must be received by November 24, 2008. Applicants may be interviewed before the closing date; however, no hiring decision will be made until after that date.

Rajeev Malik, Chair
Search #12094
University of Illinois
507 E. Green, Suite 404, MC-417
Champaign, IL 61820
217-333-8085
email: ips-jobs@illinois.edu

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer Minorities, Women, and other designated class members are encouraged to apply.

LECTOR/SR. LECTOR IN SOUTH ASIAN LANGUAGES (SANSKRIT)
Multi-year appointment with the South Asian Studies Council, The MacMillan Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520 USA

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Yale seeks a Lector or Senior Lector in South Asian Languages for Sanskrit beginning July 1, 2009 for a three-year term, renewable, with actual rank dependent on qualifications/experience. Primary duties include teaching five courses per year including elementary (2 courses) and intermediate (2 courses) in Classical Sanskrit. The fifth course will focus on literary, social, cultural and/or sociolinguistic topics pertaining to Sanskrit and Ancient India. The incumbent will advise students and participate in program building of South Asian Studies at Yale. He/she will be responsible for developing the broader curriculum and pedagogic materials for Sanskrit and related linguistic/cultural resources. Applicants must have: 1) advanced level of expertise in Sanskrit; 2) strong English skills; 3) experience in teaching Sanskrit as a classical language and in other course contexts in a college or university environment; 4) an M.A. or other advanced degree in a relevant discipline; 5) experience in language pedagogy and familiarity with current methodology.

We are especially interested in candidates who can also connect their knowledge to the broader field of South Asian Studies and work across disciplinary divides. Salary is commensurate with experience and background

Review of applications will begin on January 12, 2009, and continue until the position is filled. Send letter of
application, curriculum vita and three letters of recommendation to Chair, Sanskrit Lector Search, South Asian Studies Council, Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue, P.O. Box 208206, New Haven, CT 06520, U.S.A. Submissions by email to barbara.papacoda@yale.edu will be accepted if properly identified with full title, institution and contact information of the sender. Yale University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer; applications from women and minorities are encouraged.

CALL FOR PAPERS
Preparing Language Teachers for the 21st Century:
Sixth International Language Teacher Educator Conference

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May 28 – 30, 2009
The George Washington University
Washington, D.C.
Deadline for Submissions: December 15, 2008

Designed for practitioners and researchers involved in the preparation and ongoing professional development of language teachers, LTE 2009 will address the education of teachers of all languages, at all instructional and institutional levels, and in many national and international contexts in which this takes place including: English as a Second or Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) instruction; foreign/modern/world language teaching; bilingual education; immersion education; indigenous and minority language education; and the teaching of less commonly taught languages.

Themes

The conference will focus on four broad themes:

Theme I: The Knowledge Base of Language Teacher Education
Theme II: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts of Language Teacher Education
Theme lll: Collaborations in Language Teacher Education
Theme IV: Practices in Language Teacher Education

Plenary Speakers:

* Second Language Teacher Education in Times of Change: Jack Richards, The Regional Language Centre
* Teacher Cognition and Communicative Language Teaching: Simon Borg, University of Leeds
* The Moral Lives of Teacher Educators: Bill Johnston, Indiana University
* A Sociocultural Perspective on Language Teacher Education: Karen Johnson, Pennsylvania State University

Types of Sessions

Symposia (2 hours):
Paper Sessions (25-minute papers)
Discussion Sessions (55 minutes)
Poster Sessions (60 Minutes)

For more information and to submit a proposal, please come to http://nclrc.org/lte2009

Sponsored by

The National Capital Language Resource Center
Georgetown University
The George Washington University
The Center for Applied Linguistics

The American Institute of Indian Studies welcomes applications for its summer 2009 and academic year 2009-2010 language programs.

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The American Institute of Indian Studies welcomes applications for its summer 2009 and academic year 2009-2010 language programs. Programs to be offered include Hindi (Jaipur), Bengali (Kolkata), Punjabi (Mohali), Tamil (Madurai); Marathi (Pune), Urdu (Lucknow), Telugu (Vizag), Malayalam (Thiruvananthapuram) and Sanskrit (Pune) and Pali/Prakrit (Pune). We will offer other Indian languages upon request. All academic year applicants should have the equivalent of two years of prior language study. For regular summer Hindi and Sanskrit, we require the equivalent of two years of prior study; for summer Bengali and Tamil and for second-year Hindi we require the equivalent of one year of prior study. For summer Urdu, we require the equivalent of one year of either Hindi or Urdu. We can offer courses at all levels, including beginning, in other Indian languages for the summer. Summer students should apply for FLAS (graduate students) if available for funding to cover the costs of the program. Funding for Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi and Urdu may be available through the U.S. State Department’s CLS program (see www.clscholarship.org). Academic year students are eligible to apply for an AIIS fellowship which would cover all expenses for the program. We are also offering language instruction for the fall semester. Students who participate in the fall program would not be eligible for funding from AIIS. The application deadline is January 31, 2009. Applications can be downloaded from the AIIS web site at www.indiastudies.org. Applications are available at the AIIS office, Foster 412, 1130 E. 59th Street, Chicago, IL 60637. Phone: 773-702-8638. Email: aiis@uchicago.edu.

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