2. Participants

Speakers from Korea

Hyung-Taek Lim is a professor of Korean literature in classical Chinese at Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. He is the chair of both the Daedong Institute for Korean Studies and the Academy of Asian Studies at Sungkyunkwan. He has published extensively on a wide variety of topics including Chosŏn period literature, Korean literary history, and national studies. His latest book is In search of Korean Classics: the Roots of Korean Thought and Culture (2007).

Jae-Yong Kim is an associate professor of Korean literature at Wonkwang University, Korea. He is on the editorial board for Asia: Magazine of Asian Literature. His research interests include the history of the national literature movement, North Korean literature, and colonial period resistance and collaboration. His most recent book is Collaboration and Resistance (2004).

Byung-Sul Jung is an associate professor of Korean literature at Seoul National University, Korea. His research focuses on late Chosŏn period literature. He has written extensively on Chosŏn period fiction, with his most recent article being “Comparative Research of Late Chosŏn Women’s and Men’s Fiction” (2002).

 

Participants from North America

Young-mee Yu Cho is an associate professor of Korean language and culture at Rutgers University. Her research interests include phonology, phonetics, first and second language acquisition, syntax/phonology interface, morphology, Korean and Japanese linguistics, historical linguistics, language teaching, and textbook development. Her book Korean Phonology and Morphology is forthcoming.

Ann Choi is an assistant professor of modern Korean literature at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on modern Krean poetry including poets such as Kim Sowŏl and Kim Ŏk.

Kyeong-Hee Choi is an associate professor of modern Korean literature at the University of Chicago. Her research centers on the relationship between the culture of publication and the historical experiences of modern Koreans, including the experiences of Japanese colonial rule, national division, the Korean War, the Cold War, and democratization. Her book Beneath the Vermilion Ink: Japanese Colonial Censorship and the Making of Modern Korean Literature is forthcoming.

Bruce Fulton is the inaugural holder of the Young-Bin Min Chair in Korean Literature and Literary Translation, Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia. Among his numerous translations of Korean literature are Wayfarer: New Writing by Korean Women (1997) and There a Petal Silently Falls: Three Stories by Ch’oe Yun (2008). He is also the co-editor of Modern Korean Fiction: An Anthology (2005).

Kelly Jeong has accepted a position at UC Riverside’s Department of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages that will begin in the fall of 2008. Her research and teaching interests include modern Korean literature, Korean film, popular culture, and literary and cultural theory. Her current book project is titled Modernity Arrives Again: Crisis of Gender, Masculinity, Nationhood in Modern Korean Literature and Cinema.

Jina Kim is an assistant professor of East Asian studies at Smith College. Her research focuses on the cultural history of early 20th century Korea with primary concentrations in Korean and global modernisms and urban literary modernity. She teaches courses on Korean film, contemporary popular culture, gender & modernity, urban space and identity, and survey of Korean culture from the Three Kingdoms Period to the present times.

Hae-Young Kim is an associate professor of the practice of Korean at Duke University. Her research and teaching interests focus on bilingualism, discourse grammar, second language development, and designing curriculum and materials for Korean learners. She has published on tense/aspect morphology and relative clause construction in L2 Korean, Korean heritage language students in the U.S., and classroom discourse in a content-based language class.

Ross King is an associate professor of Korean language and literature at the University of British Columbia. His research interests include Korean historical linguistics, Korean dialectology, history of Korean linguistics, and Korean language pedagogy. He co-authored the Korean language textbook series Elementary Korean and Continuing Korean and is currently working on various projects related to Korean language and literature in the USSR.

Aimee Nayoung Kwon Duke University

Ji-Eun Lee is currently teaching and working as a post-doctoral associate at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus. She received a Ph.D degree in Korean literature and culture from Harvard University and has taught and worked at the University of Toronto, Dartmouth College, and the University of British Columbia. Her research interest includes women’s reading in Colonial Korea, gender and gendered voice in Korean literature, and literary and cultural spaces. From fall of 2008, she will start as an assistant professor of Korean studies at Washington University in St. Louis.

Young-Jun Lee is a lecturer in Korean Literature in Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, and the Editor-in-Chief of AZALEA: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture, Korea Institute at Harvard University. His research interests include modern Korean literature, intellectual history of Korea, literary theory, and poetry translation. He has translated works by the poets Hwang Jiwoo and Kim Suyŏng, excerpts of which appear in the Columbia Anthology of Modern Korean Poetry (2004).

Sunyoung Park is an assistant professor of Korean literature at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on colonial period Korean literature. He most recent work is “The Colonial Origin of Korean Realism and Its Contemporary Manifestation” (2006).

Serk Bae Suh is an assistant professor of East Asian languages and literature at the University of California at Irvine. His research interests include modern Korean and Japanese literature, modern Korean and Japanese intellectual history, and colonial and postcolonial studies. His article “Treacherous Translation: the 1938 Japanese-Language Theatrical Version of the Korean Tale Ch’unhyangjŏn” is forthcoming.

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