Participants


Susan L. Burns
Wei-ti Chen
Waka Hirokawa
Rie Hogetsu
Wataru Iijima
William Johnston
Jeong-Ran Kim
Miriam Kingsberg
Chang-Geon Shin
Soyoung Suh
Akihito Suzuki
Kathryn M. Tanaka

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Susan L. Burns

Associate Professor, Department of History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago
slburns@uchicago.edu

Susan L. Burns is Associate Professor of History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Her recent work on the cultural and social history of medicine includes “Nanayama Jundô at Work: A Village Doctor and Medical Knowledge in Nineteenth Century Japan.” East Asian Science, Medicine, and Technology, no. 29 (Autumn 2008): 61-82; “Marketing ‘Women’s Medicines:’ Gender, OTC Herbal Medicines, and Medical Culture in Modern Japan,” Asian Medicine, vol. 7, no.1 (2009); and “Rethinking ‘Leprosy Prevention:’ Entrepreneurial Doctors, the Meiji Press, and the Civic Origins of Biopolitics.” Forthcoming in the Journal of Japanese Studies, summer 2012.
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Wei-ti Chen

Ph.D. Candidate, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago
wdchen@uchicago.edu

Wei-ti Chen is a PhD candidate at the University of Chicago in Japanese history. She is currently writing her dissertation under the working title of Japanese Practitioners Abroad: An Imperial History of Transnational Medicine and National Medical Profession
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Waka Hirokawa

Associate Professor, Tekijuku Commemoration Center, Osaka University
hirokawa@tekijuku.osaka-u.ac.jp

Waka Hirokawa is an Associate Professor in History at the Tekijuku Commemoration Ceneter, Osaka University. Her work is focused on community responses to state policies targeting Hansen’s Disease in the first half of the twentieth century. In addition to several articles, she is the author of Kindai Nihon no Hansen-byo Mondai to Chiiki Shakai (The Problems of Hansen’s Disease and Regional Communities in Modern Japan, 2011). Among her current projects are studies titled The Medical Environment of Modern Japan: Hansen’s Disease in Regional Communities and International Medicine, and Constructing a New Archival Science Theory Based on Medical Materials.
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Rie Hogetsu

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at Ochanomizu University

・Current research interest:
The history of dentistry in modern Japan; medicalization of the mouths of the people in twentieth century Japan

・Significant publication:
Kindai Nihon ni okeru eisei no tenkai to juyō (‘Concepts of Hygiene in Modern Japan: Evolution and reception’) 2010 Toshindo
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Wataru Iijima

Professor, The History Department of Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo
wiijima@aoyamagakuin.jp

・Current research interests:
Currently research topic is anti-schistosomiasis movement in China after 1950s and preparing to publish a book on this topic. The health insurance system will be the next topic of research from the comparative analysis between China and other countries including Japan, UK, US.
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William Johnston

Professor of History, East Asian Studies, and Science in Society Program, Wesleyan University

・Current research interests:
History of cholera and public health in 19th and early 20th century Japan.
Actor-network theory and subsequent developments in relation to disease, environment, ecological disasters, and questions of agency.
Mountaintop removal mining (in the US)
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Jeong-Ran Kim

Post-doctoral Research Associate of Graduate School of Humanities, Kobe University

・Current research interests:
I am focusing on Japanese sanitary policies in Busan during the opening port period, particularly the sanitary administration led by the Japanese settlers.

・Significant publications:
‘The Politics of Hansen’s Disease in Busan during the Colonial Period’, Korean History Association Journal, No.48 (10. 2010) (Japanese)
‘A study of the cholera epidemics and anti-epidemic activities in Busan during the opening port period, focusing on the Japanese settlement and Water supply’, Cultural Interaction Studies of Sea Port Cities, No. 04 (04. 2011), Institute of International Maritime Affairs , Korea Maritime University (Korean)
‘The Circulation within the Empire: Focusing on the Quarantine agains Chosun Cow in Busan during the opening port period,’ The Domination and Regional Societies in Japanese Empire, Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies (04. 2012) (Japanese)
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Miriam Kingsberg

Assistant professor of modern Japanese history at the University of Colorado at Boulder

Miriam Kingsberg is an assistant professor of modern Japanese history at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Beginning in fall 2010, she has been on leave as an Academy Scholar at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University. Her book manuscript, Moral Nation: Modern Japan and Narcotics in Global History, is currently under review by Cambridge University Press. Miriam is also working on a new project that considers the efforts of Japanese anthropologists and archaeologists to formulate a national identity across the changing political contexts of the mid-twentieth century, including imperialism, war, occupation, and independence.
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Chang-Geon Shin

Associate Professor, History of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education, Graduate School of Mathematics and Science Education, Tokyo University of Science

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Soyoung Suh

Assistant Professor, Department of History, Dartmouth College

Soyoung Suh graduated from the University of California in Los Angeles in 2007 with a thesis entitled “Korean Medicine between the Local and the Universal: 1600-1945.” Her dissertation examines the rise of an indigenous identity in medicine, which was intertwined with regionalism, nationalism and colonialism. After spending one year at Harvard University as a Post Doctoral Fellow in the “history of modern science and technology in East Asia,” she was affiliated with the University of Westminster in London collaborating in a research project entitled “Treating the Liver: Towards A Transnational History of Medicine in East Asia, 1500-2000” funded by the Wellcome Trust. Her articles are published in Asian Medicine: Tradition and Modernity (2008) and Korean Journal of Medical History (2010). Her current research interests include “Korean consumption of Chinese medical texts and herbs,” “medical advertisements in colonial Korea,” and the “history of psychiatry in Korea.” She is now in the process of revising her dissertation into a book.
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Akihito Suzuki

Professor of History, School of Economics, Keio University

Akihito Suzuki is a Professor of History, School of Economics, Keio University. His current research is history of psychiatry in early twentieth century Japan. His publications include: Madness at Home: the Psychiatrist, the Patient and the Family in England 1820-1860 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006); “Measles and the Transformation of the Spatio-Temporal Structure of Modern Japan”, Economic History Review, 62(2009), 828-856; “Smallpox and the Epidemiological Heritage of Modern Japan: Towards a Total History”, Medical History, 55(2011), 313-318; (with Chris Aldous), Reforming Public Health in Occupied Japan, 1945-52: Alien Prescriptions? (London: Routledge, 2011).
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Kathryn M. Tanaka

Ph.D. Candidate, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago
ktanaka@uchicago.edu

Kathryn M. Tanaka is a PhD candidate at the University of Chicago in Japanese literature. She is currently completing her dissertation under the working title of Through the Hospital Gates: Hansen’s Disease and Modern Japanese Literature.
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