Tag Archives: Practical Matters

Tempus Fugit: The Fine Art of Time Management

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Lo! Behold the bleak, surrealist landscape of Winter Quarter.

Come winter in MAPH, most students find that they have much less structured time than they did in fall. Without Core twice a week and the set precept/social hour schedule on Fridays, the average MAPHer’s week looks very different from the fall.Winter inevitably means lots of unstructured time and lots to accomplish in ten weeks—which makes time management one of the biggest challenges this quarter.

For instance, I know a lot of you only have Tuesday/Thursday classes this quater—how do you make sure you’re structuring M/W/F (and the weekend) to stay on track and keep making progress with your thesis, course readings, and job hunts? Keep reading for some tips on managing your time and staying productive through the long winter months!

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9 Winter Life Hacks

Guys,

Winter is here. Ned Stark warned us and now that it has arrived, we must face the cold, cold truth.

Although the Chicago winter is tough, it doesn’t have to be entirely horrible. Below I have compiled Maph Central’s V.I.I. (Very Important Items) for the winter as well as some more general tips for the cold weather. Chicagoans, feel free to post additional advice in  the comments!

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We will all become The Winter Soldier

Very Important Items:

Sarah: Scarves! “In Chicago it’s not the actual temperature that gets you, but the wind-chill. A scarf makes all the difference.”

Maren: Fleece-lined tights (or fleece-lined anything) and Glogg Winter Drink.

Kerri: Puffy Jacket. It may not look as cool as your wool peacoat, but it is time to embrace the sleeping-bag look.  Continue reading

Eat, Sleep, Read: Part III (Managing Reading and Workload)

Eat, Sleep, Read is a three-part series on wellness in grad school. MAPH is a challenging year in a lot of ways, but you can make it way easier physically, mentally, and emotionally by taking care of yourself and managing your workload. For Part III, we’ll cover some academic tips that might help you manage your workload and deal with school-related stressors.eatpraylove

Obviously, one of the biggest stressors in grad school is the workload. In fact, it’s probably the biggest stressor. Getting enough sleep, exercising regularly, eating well—all these important aspects of wellness become difficult to maintain because there’s constantly so much to get done. So we’ve come to the last (and perhaps most important) post of this wellness series: how to manage your academic workload and find some balance in grad school!

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Eat, Sleep, Read: Part II (On Sleep)

Eat, Sleep, Read is a three-part series on wellness in grad school. MAPH is a challenging year in a lot of ways, but you can make it way easier physically, mentally, and eatprayloveemotionally by taking care of yourself and managing your workload. For Part II, we’ll cover some tips that may help you get better, more restful sleep during your time in MAPH.

 

“Methought I heard a voice cry ‘Sleep no more!” – Grad Students (or Shakespeare, I guess)

 

Sleep and grad school don’t always mix well. Between classes, writing, reading, and other demands, there aren’t enough hours in the day, and it will inevitably seem like there aren’t enough hours to get a full night’s sleep. But keeping a regular, healthy sleep schedule in grad school will make you so, so much happier. As someone who pulled all-nighters all through undergrad, I can attest that the best life change I implemented during my MAPH year was committing to being better about sleep (I only pulled one all-nighter during MAPH, by accident—long story). Below find some tips that might help you get more restful sleep on a more regular basis!

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Stacks on Stacks on Stacks: A Guest Post on the UChicago Libraries

Dear MAPHers: below, you will find a guest post from Bill Hutchison (MAPH ’12, Mentor ’13), who is a current PhD in the English Department and an avid patron of the UChicago library system. We’re happy to present this MAPHtastic classic, as it is full of sage wisdom about how to navigate the vast troves of knowledge in the Reg, Mansueto, and beyond. Enjoy!

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“Libraries raised me.”
—Isaac Asimov

The UChicago library system is—as it should be—a labyrinthine construct with countless treasures, secrets, and codes. Discovering what it holds and how to access it can be one of the great pleasures of graduate school. If you, like me, take tremendous joy from learning how to wield your library to your own wild, intellectual ends, take note: herein I will share with you some of my discoveries. Continue reading

Eat, Sleep, Read: A Wellness Series (Part I, Eating Healthy)

Eat, Sleep, Read is a three-part series on wellness in grad school. MAPH is a challenging year in a lot of ways, but you can make it easier physically, mentally, and emotionally by taking care of yourself and managing your workload. For Part I, we’ll look at the best ways to eat well during grad school.

eatprayloveEating well in grad school can be tough. It often seems like there aren’t enough hours in the day to plan out, cook, and actually eat a balanced diet. But even some small efforts in this area of your life can pay huge dividends when it comes to keeping you happy and energized throughout the year. Here are a few tips on how to fit a healthy, frugal diet into your life:

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What Are the Humanities For?

Hello MAPHers!

I am Kerri Hunt and I am here to help you answer the often-daunting question of “What are the Humanities (or an MA in the Humanities) for?” In addition to working as a Preceptor, I am also the Career and Alumni Outreach Coordinator. In other words, I am MAPH’s in-house career advisor.

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I am wise like an otter

I think of my role as MAPH career advisor as an extension and expansion of the part I play as a preceptor.  I’m here as an advisor, guide, and sounding board to help you make the most of your time in MAPH (and thereafter), with a particular focus on helping you think through the value of your studies and your degree.

“Value” here could mean economic value – how to leverage the relationships and skills you’ve built here to advance your career – but I’m also interested in discussing with you the other senses of “value” that led you here, to spend a year devoted to humanistic study.

This means that while I am available to review a cover letter, read a draft personal statement, or connect you with alumni in a relevant field, I am also concerned with the more nebulous task of helping you figure out ways to integrate your personal values and intellectual interests into your life after MAPH, whether or not you decide to pursue an academic career.

For those of you considering a PhD, I can provide insight into what it means to become a professional academic and help you use your coursework here to test whether further graduate studies are for you. If you do decide to apply to PhD programs, I can discuss strategies for building relationships with faculty; help you decide where to apply; and read drafts of your personal statement.

For those of you who are considering other careers — or jobs between MAPH and a PhD program — I can read resumes, give advice on job hunting, and put you in touch with alumni in the fields of your interests. Essentially, I am here to connect you to all the career-related resources offered by MAPH and the University of Chicago.

These include:

  • Career counselors at Graduate Student Affairs
  • GSA programming, including the Getting a Start In series, networking tutorials, and practice interviews
  • MAPH’s Teaching in the Community College class and associated programming
  • GradUCon, GSA’s January career fair for graduate students
  • The University-wide alumni network
  • Linkedin groups and resources

Also coming up soon: MAPH Alumni Career Night on November 12th. Have this event on your calendar and in the back of your mind as the quarter begins. It is an excellent opportunity to connect with alumni and learn more about popular career fields.
Just as your preceptor should be your first contact for all your questions about navigating MAPH and the University of Chicago, think of me as your point person for all career- and life path-related questions, concerns, anxieties, humorous anecdotes, etc.  This goes double for those of you who are still undecided about your future path: if you are hoping to use your MAPH year as an opportunity to explore options, change careers, grow as a person, or just figure out your next step, please come meet with me soon!

In the weeks to come, I hope to connect with every one of you – even if it’s just to say hello and introduce ourselves.  (Please bear with me as I learn all of your names.)  During Fall quarter (i.e., starting September 29) I’ll have set office hours every Tuesday and alternate Wednesdays. You can sign up in the MAPH office.  I’m also available by appointment, or to chat whenever you see me in MAPH Central, at Social Hour, or around campus.

I look forward to meeting you all!

 

 

Colloquium 2014 Schedule

Dear MAPHers,

Colloquium has arrived! Alien! Henry James! Bagels! There is clearly a lot to keep track of in these first two weeks, so below is a schedule of various goings on. Colloquium is still a good time to get done any errands (refer back to our To Do List post for recommendations) and to keep exploring the city in your downtime. But feel free to stop by the office with questions or to say hello!

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To Dos, To Don’ts: Ta Da

Things to Do Before MAPH:

The Practical Edition

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It probably feels like there is a lot to do before MAPH starts. And, well, that is accurate. But, it is no reason to be overwhelmed or not to enjoy the end of the summer! We have created two lists, this first one is more practically-minded. (The second will be posted in a few days) Below are some things we suggest you do before Colloquium begins.

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A Colloquium Primer

Hey Guys! It is almost exactly a month until the MAPH year begins, and we in the office are incredibly excited about it! We will continue to send you emails about meet-ups and a couple of events before Colloquium begins. But for you convenience/peace of mind/proof that this is really happening, below is a brief description of Colloquium. This is just to give you an idea of what these two weeks will look like. But please email us (lbryan@uchicago.edu and matthewcstone@uchicago.edu) if you have any questions or definitely pop into the office (Classics 117) whenever you arrive. Continue reading