Tag Archives: Library

smartcafe

Anywhere but the Reg: Alternate Study Spots around Campus

Welcome back, MAPH! As winter quarter begins, we’d like to cue you into some of our favorite and not too well known study spots in and around campus.

On Campus:

The Smart Museum Café (M-Fr 8am-4:30pm; Sat-Sun 11am-4:30pm)tumblr_inline_nrla95jV8t1ql85ks_540

Stuart Café (M-Fr 8am – 3pm)

Harris School Cafe (M-Fr 8am – 5pm)

Booth Café (M-Fr 7am-8pm; Sat 7am-3pm)

Logan Café ( M–Fr, 8 am–8 pm; Sat–Sun, 12pm–8pm)

Crerar Library (Sun-Th 8am-1am; Fr-Sat 8am-10pm)

Study Room on the first floor of the Center for the study of Gender and Sexuality (M-F 9am-5pm)

Library at the Oriental Institute (Hours: Closed M; T, Th-Sun 10am-5pm; W 10am-8pm)

Law Library Cafe, if you can get in (M-Th 8am – 5pm; Fr 8am – 3:30pm)

Hallowed Grounds (M-Th 8:30am-11:30pm; Fri 8:30am-9:00pm; Sat 11:30am-9:00pm; Sun 11:30am-11:30pm)

Bartlett Commons (M-Th 7am – 8:30pm; Fr 7am – 7:30pm; Sat 8am – 2:30pm; Su 8am – 8:30pm)

Stony Island Arts Bank (T-Sat 11am-6pm)

Close to Campus:

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Making Winter Break Work

Dear MAPH,

Winter break can be the perfect time to unwind, reflect on the past quarter and have a bit of a breather before the new year starts. Winter break is also the ideal time to start preliminary research on your thesis. As veterans of the thesis process, we mentors have a few thoughts about thesis work and winter break:

  • Take advantage of this time and remember that your thesis is in the preliminary research stage. You shouldn’t fool yourself into thinking that you should be crafting an argument now; rather, take this time to follow various argumentative threads and learn about your object, field, critical conversation or intended methodology. Having the time and space away from campus can allow you to do thesis work on your own time and without the pressures of classes and other projects too.
  • Ask yourself “What do I want out of the project?” Asked early, this question can solidify the real-world scope of your project. That is, your true-to-self aim in writing a thesis. Do you want to play with the idea of Aristotle or explore the role of arts in economic and community development? Do you want to write a thesis that has both creative and critical components or would you like to ground your project in a discipline-specific topic? The answers to these questions may not be obvious, but taking the time to ask yourself truthfully what it is that you want out of this project can help bring your possible abstract ideas and thoughts about the thesis into more concrete and manageable terms. Remember the project scope too: 25-35 pages. You may come up with approximately 15 different project ideas, but remind yourself of what’s possible.

Library Patron - Reading Room (apf2-05486r)

  • Read Judiciously. You won’t be able to read everything; don’t read all of EVERYTHING. Be smart about what you choose to read. If you find early on that a specific article is not invested in the same idiosyncrasies or particular line of investigation that you are, don’t be afraid to put it down! Do write down why that particular article or book didn’t work. Jot down a few sentence that explain why you didn’t like this source or why it didn’t jive with your analysis. Also, keep a list of the articles your read!
  • Just read. Getting started can be painful, but know that the time and energy invested now will pay off later in winter quarter. Trust us.

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Stacks on Stacks on Stacks: A Guest Post on the UChicago Libraries

Dear MAPHers: below, you will find a guest post from Bill Hutchison (MAPH ’12, Mentor ’13), who is a current PhD in the English Department and an avid patron of the UChicago library system. We’re happy to present this MAPHtastic classic, as it is full of sage wisdom about how to navigate the vast troves of knowledge in the Reg, Mansueto, and beyond. Enjoy!

mansueto-regenstein

 

“Libraries raised me.”
—Isaac Asimov

The UChicago library system is—as it should be—a labyrinthine construct with countless treasures, secrets, and codes. Discovering what it holds and how to access it can be one of the great pleasures of graduate school. If you, like me, take tremendous joy from learning how to wield your library to your own wild, intellectual ends, take note: herein I will share with you some of my discoveries. Continue reading

A Colloquium Primer

Hey Guys! It is almost exactly a month until the MAPH year begins, and we in the office are incredibly excited about it! We will continue to send you emails about meet-ups and a couple of events before Colloquium begins. But for you convenience/peace of mind/proof that this is really happening, below is a brief description of Colloquium. This is just to give you an idea of what these two weeks will look like. But please email us (lbryan@uchicago.edu and matthewcstone@uchicago.edu) if you have any questions or definitely pop into the office (Classics 117) whenever you arrive. Continue reading

How to Navigate the Secrets and Mysteries of the UChicago Libraries

A guest post by Bill Hutchison (MAPH ’12), an enthusiastic library patron, one of last year’s mentors, and a current PhD candidate in English at UChicago.  Bill will also talking with Matti Bunzl at today’s The Work of a Humanist: A Conversation with Matti Bunzl (PhD ’98).

stacks

Go towards the light!!

 

“Libraries raised me.”
—Isaac Asimov

The UChicago library system is—as it should be—a labyrinthine construct with countless treasures, secrets, and codes. Discovering what it holds and how to access it can be one of the great pleasures of graduate school. If you, like me, take tremendous joy from learning how to wield your library to your own wild, intellectual ends, take note: herein I will share with you some of my discoveries. Continue reading