Tag Archives: Academics

Finishing the Thesis: Do’s and Don’t’s

keep-calm-and-thesis-on-1Eighth Week is upon us, which means theses are due very soon. As you approach the Friday deadline, here are a few tips to keep you on track during one of the most hectic times of the MAPH year. Also, be sure to come by the office to let us know how things are shaping up!


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Works in Progress Conference 2015


Jason Nebergall presents his research on Ernie Kovacs’ “The Silent Show”.

On February 27th, eight current MAPH students presented their thesis research at our annual Works in Progress Conference. With topics ranging from philosophy to English to linguistic to cultural studies, the presenters shared fascinating projects that are well on their way to becoming impressive MA theses. Click below the jump to read summaries of the conference papers and see photos from the event!


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10 Books to Read Before Grad School

MAPH is an intense year, and reading time quickly becomes a scarce keep-calm-and-love-reading-64resource—so we here at MAPHtastic polled some of our current students, staff, and alums to see what books they wish they had read before doing the program. See below the jump to see what might be a good beach book for the summer before, or what theory people wish they had read before the MAPH Core class in fall!

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Tempus Fugit: The Fine Art of Time Management


Lo! Behold the bleak, surrealist landscape of Winter Quarter.

Come winter in MAPH, most students find that they have much less structured time than they did in fall. Without Core twice a week and the set precept/social hour schedule on Fridays, the average MAPHer’s week looks very different from the fall.Winter inevitably means lots of unstructured time and lots to accomplish in ten weeks—which makes time management one of the biggest challenges this quarter.

For instance, I know a lot of you only have Tuesday/Thursday classes this quater—how do you make sure you’re structuring M/W/F (and the weekend) to stay on track and keep making progress with your thesis, course readings, and job hunts? Keep reading for some tips on managing your time and staying productive through the long winter months!

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Eat, Sleep, Read: Part III (Managing Reading and Workload)

Eat, Sleep, Read is a three-part series on wellness in grad school. MAPH is a challenging year in a lot of ways, but you can make it way easier physically, mentally, and emotionally by taking care of yourself and managing your workload. For Part III, we’ll cover some academic tips that might help you manage your workload and deal with school-related stressors.eatpraylove

Obviously, one of the biggest stressors in grad school is the workload. In fact, it’s probably the biggest stressor. Getting enough sleep, exercising regularly, eating well—all these important aspects of wellness become difficult to maintain because there’s constantly so much to get done. So we’ve come to the last (and perhaps most important) post of this wellness series: how to manage your academic workload and find some balance in grad school!

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Stacks on Stacks on Stacks: A Guest Post on the UChicago Libraries

Dear MAPHers: below, you will find a guest post from Bill Hutchison (MAPH ’12, Mentor ’13), who is a current PhD in the English Department and an avid patron of the UChicago library system. We’re happy to present this MAPHtastic classic, as it is full of sage wisdom about how to navigate the vast troves of knowledge in the Reg, Mansueto, and beyond. Enjoy!



“Libraries raised me.”
—Isaac Asimov

The UChicago library system is—as it should be—a labyrinthine construct with countless treasures, secrets, and codes. Discovering what it holds and how to access it can be one of the great pleasures of graduate school. If you, like me, take tremendous joy from learning how to wield your library to your own wild, intellectual ends, take note: herein I will share with you some of my discoveries. Continue reading

CAS Workshops


The very first CAS workshop.

As the quarter gets underway, you’ll notice a ton of emails in your inbox from the various CAS workshops on campus. You may have heard a bit about these interdisciplinary working groups from preceptors and professors so far, but to recap briefly, workshops are seminar-style meetings of informal research groups sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies. These meetings (which are usually once every two weeks) offer a venue for professors and graduate students to convene in an informal setting where they share, discuss, and critique each other’s work. (Also, there is usually nice cheese involved…)

Right now, there are over 70 different workshops ranging from Poetry and Poetics to Mass Culture to Gender and Sexuality (see the full list here). I guarantee you will find at least one—and probably several—that pique your interest. And when you do, go to their webpage and sign up for the listserv. Then you’ll get updates on when/where they are and what to read in advance. Signing up does not commit you to going all (or any) of the workshop sessions—you can attend as many or as few as your schedule allows.


Last year, I joined the Theater and Performance Studies Workshop early in fall, and it became one of the best parts of my MAPH year. The workshops are a big part of graduate student life on campus, and if you like to learn more about them, GSA will be hosting a Master’s Monday “Introduction to CAS Workshops” on October 13th at 9:30 am. I am a firm believer that there are some very concrete benefits to getting involved with a workshop during this year. For instance…

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