Category Archives: On Campus

University of Chicago, Hyde Park, Chicago




Yes, graduation is several weeks and a thesis away, questions about Convocation weekend are starting to trickle in. So, here’s all the relevant information for that all-important weekend collected for your convenience.

June 3: Note that grades are due to the Registrar’s Office by Friday, June 3. This means that you need to have submitted your final papers in time for your professor to grade them by this date, or else arranged with your professor to take a Convocation grade. The latter is a stand-in grade (usually a B or B-) given to you so that you meet the required number of class grades for graduation. Your professor will change this grade in the summer after they’ve reviewed and assessed your final paper, and the updated grade will be the one that appears on your transcript.

Early June: This is a good time to pop over to the UChicago Bookstore and buy your cap and gown, which are required if you want to walk in the graduation ceremony. The cap/gown combination costs around $52. Keep your eyes peeled for an exciting MAPH competition in Spring Quarter with a first prize of one lovely second-hand cap and gown set.

June 10: The MAPH Friends and Family Reception will take place in Classics 110 from 3-5pm on Friday June 10th. This is a great chance to introduce your friends and family to your MAPH friends, the directors, the MAPH staff and, most importantly, your mentors.  Of course, all MAPHers are welcome to attend this especially-fancy final social hour-esque event without bringing any guests. Come and eat delicious food, drink champagne and meet adults that look vaguely familiar. We hope you can all attend!

June 11: Convocation(s). The University of Chicago holds multiple convocations on graduation day (which apparently many universities do, but was news to me last year).

The University-wide convocation starts at 9:15 am and is held on the main quad. This ceremony is for the whole university: tickets are not required. There will probably be a guest speaker and the opportunity to walk in a big crowd of people dressed identically to you.

MAPH will host a lunch for you and your friends and family in Bartlett Commons at 11:30 am (No tickets or RSVP needed). From the lunch, MAPH graduands will go directly to the Reynolds Club (the Humanities division graduation takes place in Mandel Hall) and wait in line while everyone gets thoroughly alphabetized. The Maph staff will shortly thereafter direct your guests over to Mandel Hall to take their seats.

Convocation will begin at 1:45 in Mandel Hall, and the ceremony usually lasts about an hour. Once again, no tickets are needed for guests to attend the ceremony. Afterwards, we hope you’ll join us for the post-ceremony toast (with champagne!) on Bartlett Quadrangle starting at around 3pm.

After that, we hope you’ll all celebrate your fantastic achievements!


Always feel free to email us with questions. We’ll also be putting out more posts about transportation, things to do, recommended places to take your family to dinner, etc., but here at least are the date and an outline of what the weekend looks like. For questions about graduation requirements and deadlines (for instance, questions about restrictions or incompletes), consult Maren and/or your preceptor.

The university’s official website for Convocation can be found here and, for the Humanities Division in particular, here.


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Campus Days 2016: Transportation!

Hello, Prospective Students!
We’re excited to meet you all for Campus Days. But first, here is some advice for getting to Hyde Park and even exploring other parts of Chicago, if you have time. Below are our recommendations for transportation. Feel free to email us ( if you have any questions!

From the Airport:
O’Hare: The Blue Line runs straight from Chicago O’Hare to the Loop, where you can hop on ctathe 6 or 2 bus down to Hyde Park.

Midway: The 55 bus goes straight from Midway Airport to Hyde Park. The 55th & Ellis stop is essentially on campus, but if you’re staying a little farther east, ask your host (or Google) which stop you should disembark at. You can also jump on the Orange Line from Midway, which will take you to the Loop, where you can grab a train to another neighborhood if you are staying or exploring outside of Hyde Park.

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Works In Progress Conference 2016

Last Friday, eight MAPH students presented their ongoing thesis research at our annual Works in Progress Conference. Working on topics ranging from Art History to Linguistics and Music Philosophy to Cultural Studies, each of our presenters shared fascinating, nuanced projects that are well on their way to becoming impressive MA theses in the spring. You can find summaries of the conference papers and photos from the event below.

Kate Schlachter

Kate Schlachter

Kate Schlachter‘s project focuses on a tapestry and performance piece by artist Indira Allegra entitled “Saint Davis of Savannah”, and explores how we can use the concept of witnessing as a framework for considering the elastic relationship between presence and event in trauma.

Nick Rekenthaler is currently working on a creative thesis project which takes the form of a fiction novella. The analytic component to Nick’s thesis draws on the philosopher Ian Hacking’s concept of ‘making up people’, a process of creating new categories of being through assigning a specific label to a person.

Nick Rekenthaler

Nick Rekenthaler

Sam Grayck‘s  thesis is a comparative endeavor to break down the relationship between two major First World War literary texts, Undertones of War, by Edmund Blunden, and Ernst Jünger’s Storm of Steel. Sam argues that each ostensible “memoir” is actually a highly crafted creative work, comprised of three dominant layers: real events, artistic rendering, and collective memory.

Nic Holt focuses in his project on the video artist Juan Downey’s 1973 performance installation Plato Now, which is loosely based on Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave.” Nic examines the ways in which Downey simulates and diverges from this source material in an attempt to provide a re-conceptualization of the Platonic Idealism the allegory was originally devised to illustrate.


Panel 1 Q&A Session, L-R: Moderator Matt Hauske, Kate Schlachter, Nick Rekenthaler, Sam Grayck, Nic Holt

Julia Gantman

Julia Gantman

Julia Gantman‘s thesis project explores images of sight and vision in Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” Julia considers how these images relate to language drawn from Joseph Priestley’s eighteenth-century accounts of optics and light in Vision, Light, and Colours.

Trevor McCulloch’s project looks at the visual construction and architectural spaces of two films directed by Nicholas Ray: Rebel Without a Cause and Bigger than Life. Trevor focuses on the domestic spaces represented within the two films in order to uncover how their unique visual approaches to architecture constitute and reflect the anxieties concerning gender identity in 1950s America.

Trevor McCulloch

Trevor McCulloch

Sarah Welch‘s project is an examination of a merge between gerunds and participles in the syntax-semantics subfields of linguistics. Whilst linguists agree that the two word types appear to be merging, Sarah argues that the two have certain fundamental differences.

Jake Mecham is working on a project in Music Philosophy. Jake claims that the problem of music’s capacity is what of music remains after layers of symbolism have been stripped. As part of his project, Jake dissects semantically over-determined musical examples to show how our musical outlook changes as we grow from infancy to adulthood, and, more importantly, how it stays the same.

Panel 2 Q&A Session, L-R: Julia Gantman, Trevor McCulloch, Sarah Welch, Jake Mecham

Panel 2 Q&A Session, L-R: Julia Gantman, Trevor McCulloch, Sarah Welch, Jake Mecham

Thank you to Kate, Nick, Sam, Nic, Julia, Trevor, Sarah and Jake, and to Matt, our moderator. Moreover, thanks so much to all of those MAPH students, preceptors and faculty who came out to support our presenters.


Works in Progress & How to Give a Talk Talk

Each year, MAPH hosts a Works in Progress Conference where a select number of students present on their ongoing thesis work and get the opportunity to answer questions and obtain feedback from their peers.  The How to Give a Talk Talk works well as a precursor to the Works in Progress Conference and also provides some insight into how exactly academics come to share their work with a larger audience. These annual and well-beloved MAPH event celebrates the newbackcollaborative and interdisciplinary nature of the MAPH thesis. Past presenters have presented on topics ranging from Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison to the American funeral industry to the logic of choice to the ideas of courtly love present in the poems of Edmund Spenser. You can read about last year’s presenters  here.

This year’s conference will begin at 12pm on Friday, February 26th in Harper 140. There will be two panels of four presenters each, with a short break in-between. Presenters will have 8-10 minutes to talk about their topics, with a Q&A after each panel. Afterwards we’ll all head over to the Smart Museum and have some drinks to celebrate the spirit of MAPH intellectualism and collegiality, and to keep the conversation going.

If you’re interested in presenting, please email a very brief description of your thesis topic to by 12pm on Friday, February 12th. The mentors, in concert with the rest of the MAPH faculty and staff, will choose 8 presenters from the submitted materials. Here are some guidelines for your submissions:

Don’t labor too hard over the description. It should be a short paragraph, probably 5 sentences max. We aren’t expecting your thesis work to be super specific or developed at this point. Just give us a topic and an interesting question or two, and we’ll go from there.

11035610_939174466107490_9095511440115763583_nHow to Give a Talk Talk

The How to Give a Talk Talk is the event to attend to both prepare for the WIP conference and to  get a sense of what it’s like to present at a conference. Several preceptors will share their tips, experiences and general know-how about presenting and attending conferences. This year’s talk will be held on Friday February 19th at 1:00pm. I had a class last year in which we had to present 20 minute conference papers and found this talk very helpful. Plus, Hauske has a special presentation not to be missed!

If you have any questions about WIP or the Talk Talk, feel free to reach out!

All the best,

The Mentors

Distinquished Faulty Lecture

MAPH Distinguished Faculty Lecture: Janice Misurell-Mitchell & W.J.T. Mitchell

We are excited to announce that this quarter’s distinguished faculty lecture will be “Image, Sound, Text: From Theory tScreen Shot 2016-01-15 at 10.26.26 AMo Performance” by Janice Misurell-Mitchell and W.J.T. Mitchell. The lecture will take place at 4pm on Tuesday, January 19th in Classics 110, and will be followed by a reception.

Janice Misurell-Mitchell is a composer, lecturer, flutist and vocal artist, and teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has been a featured composer at Art Chicago, the University of North Carolina – Greensboro New Music Festival, the International Alliance for Women in Music Congress in Beijing, the Voices of Dissent series at the Bowling Green College of Musical Arts, the Randspiele Festival in Berlin. For many years she was a Co-Artistic Director and performer with CUBE Contemporary Chamber Ensemble. Her most recent CD, Vanishing Points, music for solo, duo, quartet was chosen by Peter Margasak of The Chicago Reader as one of the top five new music recordings in “Our Favorite Music of 2013”.

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 10.26.50 AMW.J.T. Mitchell teaches in both the English and the Art History departments at the University of Chicago. He also edits the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, a quarterly devoted to critical theory in the arts and human sciences. He works particularly on the history and theories of media, visual art, and literature, from the eighteenth century to the present. His work explores the relations of visual and verbal representations in the culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). At the University of Chicago this quarter, he is teaching a class entitled “Aesthetics of Media: Image, Music, Text.”

All MAPH students are encouraged to attend this exciting, one-of-a-kind event. We hope to see you there!


MLK Events & Other Happenings

Happy second week! Now that we’re well and truly into the swing of winter quarter, we’re lucky enough to have a break from classes next Monday for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday (Fun Fact: his birthday is actually on Friday. MLK shares his birthday with Danish footballer Nicolai Jørgensen and Latvian basketball player Aija Putniņa, whereas January 18, of course, is the birthday of 16th-century Italian-English composer Alfonso Ferrabosco the elder.)

Anyway, if you feel like doing something fun and productive with your day off, then you’ve come to the right blog post! The university has loads of events this weekend, from a ceremony in the chapel to a huge variety of great service events. The links below should help you to plan an excitingly elongated wintry weekend.

Today, Monday 11th at 6 p.m in the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, the university will hold its annual MLK Commemoration Celebration. Van Jones, CNN Contributor and Author, will offer MLK2016.web_.900x400.x2.05the keynote address.  The program also features a conversation with special guest Nikki Giovanni, Poet and Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech University, and Theaster Gates, Professor in the Department of Visual Arts and the College and Director of Arts + Public Life. Find out more about this event here!

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Anywhere but the Reg: Alternate Study Spots around Campus

Welcome back, MAPH! As winter quarter begins, we’d like to cue you into some of our favorite and not too well known study spots in and around campus.

On Campus:

The Smart Museum Café (M-Fr 8am-4:30pm; Sat-Sun 11am-4:30pm)tumblr_inline_nrla95jV8t1ql85ks_540

Stuart Café (M-Fr 8am – 3pm)

Harris School Cafe (M-Fr 8am – 5pm)

Booth Café (M-Fr 7am-8pm; Sat 7am-3pm)

Logan Café ( M–Fr, 8 am–8 pm; Sat–Sun, 12pm–8pm)

Crerar Library (Sun-Th 8am-1am; Fr-Sat 8am-10pm)

Study Room on the first floor of the Center for the study of Gender and Sexuality (M-F 9am-5pm)

Library at the Oriental Institute (Hours: Closed M; T, Th-Sun 10am-5pm; W 10am-8pm)

Law Library Cafe, if you can get in (M-Th 8am – 5pm; Fr 8am – 3:30pm)

Hallowed Grounds (M-Th 8:30am-11:30pm; Fri 8:30am-9:00pm; Sat 11:30am-9:00pm; Sun 11:30am-11:30pm)

Bartlett Commons (M-Th 7am – 8:30pm; Fr 7am – 7:30pm; Sat 8am – 2:30pm; Su 8am – 8:30pm)

Stony Island Arts Bank (T-Sat 11am-6pm)

Close to Campus:

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How to Do MAPH on a Budget: Part 2

MAPHletes! You are sprinting towards mid-quarter and keeping up a great pace! You’re starting to feel a bit of chill in the air, and it can be easy to just hole up in the Regenstein and study. (Note: studying is good and generally encouraged.) But while it’s still livable outside you might also want to explore more of Hyde Park and clear your mind. What better way to do so than with free stuff? To point you in that direction, here’s the second installment of Morgan Podraza’s “How to Do MAPH on a Budget.”  Enjoy!

10 Free Things to Do in Hyde Park:

blogpicAIf you live in Hyde Park, it’s going to be difficult to get out of Hyde Park during MAPH. For me, I was always thinking things like: “but that hour that I spend traveling back-and-forth could be spent in an attempt to understand what Lauren Berlant means by a slow death.” Don’t worry! There are plenty of great things to do in HP between paragraphs of LB.

The Smart Museum of Art (5550 S. Greenwood Ave.)

This museum is located on campus and collaborates with scholars to “establish itself as a driving force for creative thinking through the arts at the University of Chicago.” The exhibits include Asian art, contemporary art, something referred to as “old master” European art, and modern art/ design.

The Oriental Institute (1155 E. 58th Street)


This museum is located on campus between the Quad and the Booth school. Not only does the Oriental Institute have amazing artifacts of the ancient Near East, including a statue of King Tut, but the museum also offers free programs and events throughout the year. An orientation week event, for example, is “Bulls and Buns:” get some of Anne Sather’s famous cinnamon rolls while you check out collections from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Israel!

Museum of Science and Industry (5700 S. Lake Shore Drive)

The Museum of Science and Industry is a great building with an interesting history, but it is also HUGE. The bottom level has an entire WWII German U-505 submarine. While the museum can be expensive to visit most days, there are a bunch of FREE DAYS. Just bring your student ID, and you can spend the entire day learning about everything from robots to humpback whales.

Promontory Point


Promontory Point (known also as The Point) has an incredible view of the city and is a lovely place to lay in the sun, or under the trees, and relax. The Point also has a few fire pits, which are the perfect places to eat s’mores and enjoy the company of other MAPHers, but you will need to either get there early to reserve a pit or potentially hang out with some other Pointers.


57th Street Beach (57th street and Lake Shore Drive)

As a New Mexican, I was so excited to live next to an actual body of water with an actual beach. 57th Street Beach is a lovely beach and a short walk from Promontory Point. Bring something cold to drink and a book to read (perhaps Foucault’s The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1) for a warm day in the sand.  (Editor’s note: our warm days might be behind us… But the Point and beach are looking beautiful in their autumnal dressings!)

Osaka Japanese Garden (6401 S. Stony Island Ave.)

blogpic3The Osaka Japanese Garden is a zen-like refuge from the fast-pace of Chicago and MAPH. While the Garden closed for renovations this past spring, I believe that it should be re-opened this upcoming spring.



The Arts Incubator (301 E. Garfield Blvd.)

The Arts Incubator fosters the relationship between public life and art through arts education, community events, exhibitions, performances, and talks. One of the weekly events that I enjoyed was Committed Knitters, where you can bring your coffee and current knitting project to meet other knitters and learn new techniques!

Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts (915 East 60th Street)

blogpic4The Logan Center is that crazy grey, glass building that stands across the Midway—my favorite building on campus. There is always something free to enjoy in the Logan Center: the Cabaret Series happens every other week and includes everything from string quartets to slam poets; every Sunday you can listen to music from the Sunday Song Styles performances in the café; and there are always exhibitions of contemporary art throughout the building.

The Experimental Station (6100 S. Blackstone Ave.)

The Experimental Station is located south of the Midway and hosts a variety of artistic and cultural events, including music, theater, art exhibitions, workshops, and lectures. It is also the home of the 61st Street Farmers Market, which happens every Saturday from 9AM-2PM throughout the year (even in the winter!).

University of Chicago Events

blogpicTake advantage of all of the amazing, free events that the University of Chicago offers students! There are so many events to enjoy on campus: the student circus, yoga classes, tea & pipes at the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, lectures by world-renowned faculty, the Blessing of the Animals, Pet Love (the University brings therapy dogs onto campus, and you just pet them!), and more. To keep track of all the events and happenings, download the University of Chicago app.