Category Archives: Chicago info

What I Talk about when I Talk about Winter Quarter

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You’ve mastered survival of the polar vortex, you’re well on your way to producing a real live thesis proposal and awkward prom-date-style asking an adviser, and you’ve got a cheering squad of MAPH staff to support you as Winter Quarter kicks in.

That said, Winter Quarter can really SUCK. It’s dark, cold, and you’re being asked to do an INSANE amount of reading/papers/job stuff/general being human type things. While it’s easy to feel like you have time for absolutely nothing besides thesis and school, it is essential this quarter to stay healthy and balanced. 

1. Talk!

It can be incredibly helpful to talk to someone who is not also immersed in thesising. Looking for a way to get something off your chest, or not sure if it would be useful to talk to someone on a regular basis? Student Counseling offers a Let’s Talk program, which offers walk-in meetings with a counselor. Student Counseling also has resources for academic struggles like procrastination or developing speed-reading skills.

And as always, if you feel like you need to see another human, are looking for someone to complain with, or just want to say hi, come by the MAPH office anytime.

2. Cozy up! (But in a new place)3743579869_db4ed34dbe_z

At this point in the year, leaving Hyde Park (or even leaving the library!) can feel like a mini-vacation. Last year I set myself the goal of getting out of Hyde Park once a week, even if it was just to study in a new place. And while it may sound silly, those trips to distant coffee shops felt INCREDIBLE. It was like I realized that there was a great big world out there that wasn’t all thinking about (and possibly criticizing) my academic work. Also, Chicago is full of awesome places – it’s so worth your time to go check them out.

Some quick recommendations from Keri for coffee (at this point last year, I was consuming on average 6 caffeinated beverages a day, so I was starting to get picky): The Bourgeouis Pig  (tip: they have a limit on Wifi, so bring your reading), Filter or The Wormhole (nerdy!) in Wicker Park, and for those who can’t leave Hyde Park, Bridgeport Coffee has a location in the Hyde Park Art Center

3. Sunshine (from the indoors!)Why-is-it-still-winter-in-Sweden

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a real thing, although I’m not totally sure if I have it. Regardless, staying inside all the time in the dark makes me sad, but there’s no way I’m getting outside for a jog when it’s -5 out. Luckily, there are ways to get sunshine (and a healthy dose of Mother Nature) while staying indoors:

Garfield Park Conservatory – conveniently, MAPH is taking a trip to this lush and verdant (and free) place on 2/7

Lincoln Park Conservatory – this slightly smaller conservatory is right next to the zoo (and is also free)

-and of course, the giant space dome / egg library that is Mansueto – less plants, more work, but very sunny regardless

4. Bring balance to the force (or to your own life)

You may have already discovered this, but it’s pretty much impossible to do all the reading for classes AND work on your thesis AND sleep AND be an actual human AND maintain friendships AND look for a job. And that is OKAY. It is more important to maintain your mental (and physical!) health than to finish all the readings. Do enough of your work to participate well in class, and then TAKE A BREAK.

While you’re at it, put a ban on guilt: set a (reasonable) to-do list, and once it’s done, allow yourself a guilt-free work-free break. Exercise, knit, spend time with friends, meditate, go to Tea & Pipes, watch TV, read a book that is actually not useful in any way toward your academic work, do whatever you need to in order to give your brain time off from school.

 

You got this.

BrrrrRRRRRRRrrrrrrrr: STAY WARM, YOU GUYS

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Chicago’s winter parking system…

Winter and its Quarter are here, along with some somewhat sinister trappings (aka -50 degree windchill!).  I sincerely hope that everyone is in an apartment under at least one blanket right now. Continue reading

Herein lies a LONG but VERY USEFUL post on the mysterious, elusive thing “PROFESSIONALIZATION”

Searching the word “professionalize” in Google images leads to some pretty abstract, random stuff: mountains, schoolchildren, businessy-looking people in suits, even cats. Professionalization can often feel like a vague, abstract task–one that you’re unsure how to go about doing, but one that seems expected of you.

As in, MAPH expects it of you. A large part of MAPH’s work in developing better thinkers, writers, and humanists is helping students conquer the professional world–or at least, helping students look astutely at application materials, get a handle on job markets, and think about how the humanities work both within and outside of the academy.

Luckily, your journey into professionalism in MAPH doesn’t have to be confusing and daunting. In MAPH land, professionalization means developing your skills, experience, and connections, and being able to write and talk about those things in compelling and interesting ways.

Professionalization doesn’t have to be this creepy, I promise.

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE:

1. You are thinking of working after MAPH.

It takes an average of 3-6 months to get a job, sometimes longer depending on the industry. If you do the math, that means ideally you’ll start applying for jobs in Winter Quarter (you know, 2 months from now). Unfortunately, Winter Quarter is the busiest time of the MAPH year–3 classes, a thesis, IT’S SO COLD OUTSIDE. Getting your resume in shape now cannot possibly be a bad idea.  Continue reading

Service Match Community Partner Profiles

Get access to all of Chicago!

Get access to all of Chicago!

If you are interested in getting involved with the Hyde Park community while gaining skills and experiences that will doubtless be useful to you after MAPH, please be sure to read Keri’s blog post about Service Match from last week.  We now have the full list of Community Partners & volunteer opportunities for this year’s program, so please read on for brief descriptions of the opportunities available.  There are some pretty amazing ones. You can also find the application online here.

Also, a reminder:  Crystal Coats will be in Classics 110 to talk/answer questions about Service Match this Wednesday, September 18 at 10:30 am.  We strongly recommend that you attend if you are thinking about applying for any of these opportunities.

Coppin Community Center/ Coppin AME Church

5627-33 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637

Description of Volunteer Opportunities Available: Grant Writing, Policy Research, Youth Education, Community Development, Community-based Events, Computer Literacy, Literacy Programs Continue reading

A Beginner’s Guide to UChicago’s Campus & Its Environs

people-looking-mapHullo, MAPH ’14.  Welcome to Chicago!  We presume that most of you are here or about to be here by now, so we’ve created two Google maps that we hope you will find handy as you settle in.  On one of these you will find information about on-campus points of interest like cafes, ATMs, and, significantly, Colloquium/Core event locations. The other highlights Continue reading

***Learnapalooza in Logan Square***

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What is Learnapalooza? It’s a community-based festival offering free workshops and classes lead by volunteers and hosted by local businesses. You’re about to go deep into a specific kind of learning, so if you’re looking for different–perhaps more relaxing–ways to use your brain and get to know Chicago/Chicagoans beforehand, consider volunteering for or attending the festival.  This year’s Logan Square Learnapalooza takes place on Sunday, September 22 all day in various Logan Square locations.  Classes include:  Continue reading

Volunteer! The Chicago Humanities Festival

CHF's awesome visual for this year's theme.

CHF’s awesome visual for this year’s theme.

As you may already know, the Chicago Humanities Festival recently announced its Fall Festival schedule. This year’s theme is ANIMAL, and the line-up looks super exciting.

Interested in attending events, but feeling the strain of the imminent tuition bill? Want to get involved with a great humanities-oriented non-profit early in the year? Consider volunteering at the festival!  Volunteering is a savvy way to make connections, get to know an organization, and gain experience (woah, professionalization!).

We are going to have several different volunteering and service opportunities throughout the year–get excited about Service Core, Service Events, and more–but for now, if you want to get going on your volunteerism/humanities activities/exploration of Chicago, check out CHF. At least one of your Mentors will be doing it, so if you have questions, you know where to find us (and if you don’t, scroll all the way down this page).

 

I’m personal hoping there will be some reflections on the following. An event on cuteness? I think yes. Maybe MAPH will have to pick that one up, though. Also, here’s your daily dose of adorable animal, normally to be found at the MAPH Nest:

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Best of the Blog: a MAPHtastic Variety Show

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This blog of ours has layers. Generations of mentors have compiled their wisdom here, and the result is actually pretty impressive: it can teach you almost anything you could want to know about the program, the neighborhood, the academic process, or the mundane details of life in MAPH. So, as we all wait for the program to begin in mid-September, we thought we’d bring a few choice posts from the last few years to your attention. Of course, you can always use the search bar or the word cloud on the right to dig up whatever information you’re looking for, or you can get in touch with us by email. Continue reading

Escape from H.P. (A How To)

So, a couple of weeks ago we suggested that you visit other Chicago neighborhoods before Colloquium starts on September 15.  If you’ve since arrived, you may now be wondering what the best way to physically get to those neighborhoods may be. We assume that most of you are all familiar with (and perhaps reliant on) Google Maps, which is obviously a great resource.  However, when heading to and from Hyde Park on the CTA, Google Maps does not always lead you down the most convenient path.   Nor does the site contain all the information that drivers need, especially in terms of parking. Hopefully this post will help fill in some of those gaps.

If you’re getting there using public transit

travel_info_header Continue reading