Norwegian PhD research Fellowship in the Anthropology of the Russian and Siberian North

The Department of Archaeology and Social Anthropology, University of Tromso is offering a fully funded 4 year PhD fellowship to conduct field research in Siberia and/or the Russian North.  The fellow will work in partnership with several funded research projects with indigenous societies  in the region.  Deadline: September 1 to begin work January 1, 2011. Complete details are available at the following website: http://www.jobbnorge.no/job.aspx?jobid=67845. Please do not hesitate to contact Dr. David Anderson (David.Anderson@uit.no) with any questions concerning the topic, salary, facilities at Tromso or the application procedures.

“The Political Machine: Sense, Sensibility and Sentiment in the Late Bronze Age South Caucasus,” Adam T. Smith, May 24

THE ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT MONDAY SEMINAR SERIES
presents

Adam T. Smith

Associate Professor
Department Anthropology
University of Chicago

Speaking on

“The Political Machine: Sense, Sensibility and Sentiment
in the Late Bronze Age South Caucasus”

Monday, May 24,  3:30 pm  Haskell 315 (5836 S. Greenwood Ave)

“Linguistic Terrains: Landscapes and Socioscapes,” 12th Annual Michicagoan Linguistic Anthropology Conference, May 14-15

Linguistic Terrains: Landscapes and Socioscapes
The 12th Annual University of Michigan – University of Chicago
Graduate Student Conference in Linguistic Anthropology

The University of Chicago, May 14th and 15th, 2010

Gordon Center for Integrative Science
929 East 57th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
Room W301/303

Keynote speech: Friday, May 14th, 6:00 PM
John Singler, Professor of Linguistics, NYU
“Keeping Pace with Space: The Creation and Negotiation of Stigmatized Linguistic Elements”
Abstract:
A crucial element of the social use of language involves the creation and negotiation of stigma, ranging in scope from the single shibboleth to the wholly stigmatized dialect. The present paper assumes that the assignment of stigma to linguistic elements arises from social motivation, but it then examines the specifically linguistic properties of stigmatized elements. It addresses a chain of linked questions, including the following:
• How much control do speakers exert over their production of stigmatized speech?
• Are there linguistic constraints on the creation of stigmatized forms? That is, are there elements of language that are likely candidates for stigma and elements which are not?
• What role, if any, does stigma play in linguistic change?

The focus of the paper is the individual as well as society, and it considers matters of agency, appropriation, and speaker awareness (while incorporating identity, ideology, and indexicality). Evidence is drawn primarily from pidgins and creoles but also from dialects of American English.

Please see the website (http://anthropology.uchicago.edu/courses/michicago/2010.shtml) for the conference schedule! (Directions to the conference venue will be added to the website shortly.)

The Politics, Communication, Society Workshop: “Mapping Europe, Nation, Self” Marina Mikhaylova, April 28

*The Politics, Communication, Society Workshop presents:*

************************
*
Marina Mikhaylova *(Anthropology, University of Chicago)
/”Mapping Europe, Nation, Self”/ <http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/pcs/PapersArchive/2009-10/Marina_Mapping%20Europe.doc>
/
Discussant: Andrew Graan, Anthropology/

Wednesday, April 28th., 4:30-6:00 pm
*
Wilder House
*5811 South Kenwood Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

*************************

This week’s paper is available from our website or by email request from the workshop co-ordinators.
Our schedule for the Spring quarter is available on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/pcs/

If you have questions or believe you may need assistance to attend, please contact the workshop co-ordinators:
Yazan Doughan (yazan@uchicago.edu)
Monica Lee (monicalee@uchicago.edu).

*************************

Politics, Communication, Society is a graduate student workshop at the
University of Chicago tying together diverse strands of research on the
political aspects and social roles of communicative practices. Our
faculty advisors are Susan Gal, Andreas Glaeser, Michael Silverstein,
and Lisa Wedeen.

QUALIA Conference, University of Chicago, April 30 to May 1, 2010

*Qualia: Anthropological Explorations in the Experience of Quality*
Anthropology Department, University of Chicago, April 30 & May 1, 2010
Organizers: Nicholas Harkness & Lily Hope Chumley

Nancy D. Munn’s pioneering ethnography, _The Fame of Gawa: A Symbolic Study of Value Transformation in a Massim (Papua New Guinea) Society_, was a seminal contribution to the anthropology of qualities and their cultural valuation. Drawing on Charles S. Peirce’s concept of the “qualisign,” Munn showed how the structured experience of valuable qualities in the Gawan lived world figured as signs in rituals of exchange, processes of value transformation, and the production and expansion of “intersubjective spacetime.” This conference builds on Munn’s ethnographic and analytical insights to explore recent areas of interest in the anthropology of qualitative experience, such as the senses, materiality, language, embodiment, aesthetics, and affect.

We broaden the theoretical field by introducing Peirce’s more general term, “qualia” (sing. “quale”), which refers to what people understand to be the experiences of qualities of things and events in their world. Using this concept, the papers in this conference link Munn’s pioneering work to more recent anthropological research by investigating the orientation to and valorization of qualia in differently scaled, diverse, and sometimes geographically dispersed social formations. Papers in the conference address topics as diverse as synaesthesia, language and transnational communication, pulse-taking, stage performance, diamonds, and mobility to understand how qualia figure in the production and maintenance of contemporary social relations — such as intimacies and hierarchies, communities and publics.

Schedule and further details at: lucian.uchicago.edu/workshops/semiotics/qualia/ For more information, contact Nicholas Harkness (hark@uchicago.edu)

In Brief:

Key Note Lecture, Nancy D. Munn, Friday, April 30, 3:00 pm, Stuart 105

Conference Sessions Saturday, May 1, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm  Swift Hall, 3rd Floor Lecture Hall

Faculty Presentations: Yarimar Bonilla (U Virginia), Judith Farquhar, Susan Gal, Joseph Hankins (UCSD), Daniel Miller (University College London)
Alaina Lemon (University of Michigan), Michael Silverstein

Graduate Student Presentations: Filipe Calvao, Lily Hope Chumley, Nicholas Harkness, Shunuke Nozawa, Laurence Ralph, Jonathan Rosa, Eitan Wilf

“Everyday Matters: Embodied Life and Experience” UChicago Anthropology Department, April 9-10

Everyday Matters: Embodied Life and Experience
Anthropology Department, University of Chicago, April 9-10, 2010

The Franke Institute for the Humanities, 1100 East 57th Street

While a signifying body has long been presumed in anthropology, new inquiries are shifting attention to material bodies and lived experience. Attending to the clinical, carnal, pharmaceutical, spiritual, technological, biomedical, folk and biopolitical techniques and spaces of everyday lived experience, we call for a reimagination of materiality and the reality of “the human” and “life.” What forms of embodiment can we conceive, in practice, historically or in the contemporary moment? If human essence is not presupposed but assumed to be composed in processes that require explanation, how do we imagine experience, shared or otherwise? Asking questions about biology and ontology, perception and agency, the scholarship we seek to present upsets the binary of culture-nature, locating processes of bodily production in the entangled spaces between classical domains. Starting from the premise that bodies and subjectivities are always local, contingent, and historical forms of existence, and inquiring about the spatiotemporality of the “human” and about “life,” this conference leaves the materiality of bodies open to newly imagined empirical projects and invites a rethinking of embodiment via ethnography, archaeology, history, philosophy, literary and visual culture studies.

FRIDAY, 9 APRIL
1:30pm3pm: Gathering

Body in the time of genomics
Margaret Lock (Social Studies of Medicine, McGill University)

Building the Biographies of Subjects: The body and bioarchaeologies
Maureen Marshall (Anthropology, University of Chicago)

Toward a bodily unconscious: political crisis of embodiment in The Bell Jar and Regeneration
Aleksandr Prighozin (English, University of Chicago)

3:30pm5pm: Excavating

“That their bones might lie soft”: Cosseting and punishing the dead body in early modern Britain
Sarah Tarlow (Archaeology, University of Leicester)

Timekeeper: A visual construction of experience
Vesna Jovanovic (Artist, Chicago)

Messploitation: Styles of attachment, styles of loss, and the scene of ongoingness in A&E’s “Hoarders”
Sean Hutchison (English, University of Chicago)

5:30pm6:30pm: Reception and Art Exhibit

……………………………….

Saturday, 10 April
9am
10:15am: Weighing

Ethical substance and endurance in late Liberalism
Elizabeth Povinelli (Anthropology, Columbia University)

‘Mombasa Morans:’ Embodied value, ethnic bodies, and Samburu men in Kenyan tourism
George Paul Meiu (Anthropology, University of Chicago)

Better Than Well: On the ethics of pharmaceutical improvement
Fred Ketchum (Anthropology and School of Medicine, University of Chicago)

10:30am11:45am: Feeling

Emotions: A history
Jonathan Rée (Philosopher)

Training 20,000 Saints: The doctor’s spatiotemporal body, experiences of care, and soteriological ideals in Venezuela’s new public health ‘mission’
Amy Cooper (Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago)

To Bear a Life
Larisa Jasarevic (Anthropology, University of Chicago)

12:00pm1pm: Lunch Break

1pm2:15pm: Intervening

The Hypnotist and his Politics
Eugene Raikhel (Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago)

Reckoning Drug-time: Temporality and the body in pediatric HIV treatment in Botswana
Betsey Brada (Anthropology, University of Chicago)

Strategies, Tactics and Maneuvers: The practice of everyday life in Tsinghua College (1911-1928)
Chen-Chen (Anthropology, University of Chicago)

2:30pm4pm: Endnotes

Judith Farquhar
Margaret LockSarah Tarlow
Elizabeth Povinelli
Jonathan Rée

“Everyday Matters: Embodied Life and Experience,” Univ. of Chicago, April 9-10

“Everyday Matters: Embodied Life and Experience”

April 9 and 10, 2010

Call For Papers

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago is pleased to announce the upcoming conference entitled “Everyday Matters: Embodied Life and Experience”, which is scheduled to take place April 9th and 10th of 2010.   Outside contributors thus far include philosopher Jonathan Rée, anthropologists Margaret Lock and Elizabeth Povinelli, archaeologist Sarah Tarlow, and visual artist Vesna Jovanovic. In addition, we have space for a few additional presentations from University of Chicago students and faculty.

The conference is envisioned as an opportunity to engage in conversations that will push toward domains and issues related to body, materiality, and experience. While a signifying body has long been presumed in anthropology, new inquiries are shifting attention to material bodies and lived experience. Attending to the clinical, carnal, pharmaceutical, spiritual, technological, biomedical, folk and biopolitical techniques and spaces of everyday lived experience, we call for a reimagination of materiality and the reality of “the human” and “life.” What forms of embodiment can we conceive, in practice, historically or in the contemporary moment? If human essence is not presupposed but assumed to be composed in processes that require explanation, how do we imagine experience, shared or otherwise? Asking questions about biology and ontology, perception and agency, the scholarship we seek to present upsets the binary of culture-nature, locating processes of bodily production in the entangled spaces between classical domains. Starting from the premise that bodies and subjectivities are always local, contingent, and historical forms of existence, and inquiring about the spatiotemporality of the “human” and about “life,” this conference leaves the materiality of bodies open to newly imagined empirical projects and invites a rethinking of embodiment via ethnography, archaeology, history, philosophy, literary and visual culture studies.

Presentations will be 15 minutes in length; no papers will be pre-distributed. If you wish to be considered for the conference, please send a title and a one-paragraph abstract to Aaron Seaman (ats2@uchicago.edu) by Tuesday, March 9.

Call for Proposals: “Entity, Construction, Relation: Critical Approaches to Time/Space…” Central European University (Budapest), Deadline: April 1

Entity, Construction, Relation: Critical Approaches to
Time/Space, the State and Knowledge Production in Sociology
and Social Anthropology
Graduate Conference
www.ceu.hu/soc_anth_conference

Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology
Central European University
June 11-13 2010, Budapest

Substantivist, constructivist, and relational perspectives on
the social world have coexisted more or less harmoniously
within social sciences since the beginning of their
institutionalisation. However, epistemological positioning
means making strong assumptions about the nature of social
reality and about our possibility to know anything about it.
Our conference aims to be an open forum for discussing the
advantages and the limits of these perspectives, and their
implications when adopted in the study of three selected core
topics in social sciences: time/space, the state and knowledge
production.

We invite young scholars from wide variety of disciplines to
present in one of three panels: “Space for Time/Time for
Space”; “The State, Citizenship, and Transnational Flows”;
“Measure for Measure: Knowledge, Culture, and the Third Wave
Marketization.” We welcome both empirical and theoretical
papers dealing with these topics. Given the theme of the
conference, papers demonstrating epistemological awareness and
transparency are especially encouraged.
The conference is organised by PhD students from the
Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at the Central
European University. It will take place between the 11th–13th
of June 2010 in Budapest. We have limited funds to cover
travel and accommodation, please indicate your travel costs
when applying.

Please send your abstract and a short CV by April 1st to:
soc_anth_conference@ceu-budapest.edu
Successful applicants will be notified by April 10th at the
latest. The deadline for the final paper is May 15th to allow
for circulation prior to the conference.

TIME/SPACE PANEL: “Space for Time/Time for Space”

Keynote Speaker: Professor Andrew Abbott, University of Chicago

The spatial turn in social sciences heralded the introduction
of space-derived concepts and metaphors in thinking about the
complexities of of a spatiality-differentiated world. More
recently time and temporality has also reasserted its
importance in the work of scholars across a wide-variety of
disciplines and subject matters. In what ways does the
appreciation of the temporal-spatial qualities of our research
subject help us? Is the conceptual separation of time and
space artificial? Can we understand them together? We welcome
anthropological and sociological contributions of an empirical
and theoretical nature that explicitly take space-based or
time-based approaches to their chosen subject.

Topics might include but should by no means be limited to:
everyday life rhythms, urban spatial-temporal
segregation/separation, time/space or space/time conquests
related to global capitalism, phenomenological approaches to
time and space, modernity’s colonization of time and space,
the spatial-temporality of place, the body’s relation to time
and space.

STATE PANEL: “The State, Citizenship, and Transnational Flows”

Keynote Speaker: Professor Jonathan Friedman, Lund University
and École des hautes études en sciences sociales

The panel focuses on the historical transformations of the
relationship between the state and citizenship, especially
(but not exclusively) within the framework of the major
processes related to financial and cultural globalization.
Our aim is to bring together young scholars who try to
contribute to the broad theoretical debates around:
transnational versus global, deterritorialization versus
reterritorialization, disappearing versus reconfiguring states
within global capital flows, universalism versus cultural
difference, social and human rights, transnational social
justice, reconfiguring class and ethnic relations, global
versus national citizenship, and the making of political subjects.
The papers can address these issues and other related ones in
different ways, from theoretical approaches to highly
historically grounded empirical research. As the general theme
of the conference suggests, papers which briefly discuss the
implications of the scholar’s epistemological position on
different steps of the research process, including the
questions posed and the findings, are especially welcome.

CULTURE & KNOWLEDGE PANEL: “Measure for Measure”: Knowledge,
Culture, and the Third Wave Marketization

Keynote Speaker: Professor Jean-Louis Fabiani, Central
European University

This panel circumscribes the field of culture and knowledge,
the immaterial production of things and dissemination and
consumption in contemporary settings. It centres on the
current relations and amalgamations of culture and knowledge
in the spheres of politics and the economy.

Hence, we welcome research and theoretical papers that grapple
with the topics of: cultural transformation in a globalized
world, commodification and de-commodification of knowledge and
culture, the intellectual property regime, Creative Commons,
connections of culture and especially popular culture with
various sorts of populism, nationalism and cosmopolitanism,
the dissemination and consumption of such cultural products,
connections between new cultural items and power.

We also welcome ethnographic studies of communities that form
and develop around the production and consumption of knowledge
and culture, which deal with the social and political
significance of collective experience, identity and affect as
they come about in physical and virtual spaces.

“After the Revolution: Youth Democracy and the Politics of Disappointment in Postsocialist Serbia,” Northwestern University, February 22

The Northwestern University Department of Anthropology 2009 – 2010 Colloquium Series
Proudly Presents:

Jessica Greenberg, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Studies, Northwestern University

on Monday, February 22 at 3pm
Anthropology Building (1810 Hinman Ave), Seminar Room 104

Dr. Greenberg will be presenting the following:

After the Revolution: Youth, Democracy and the Politics of
Disappointment in Postsocialist Serbia

On October 5, 2000 the citizens of Serbia staged a mass democratic
revolution on the streets of Belgrade. Hundreds of thousands of people
poured into the capital demanding in signs, songs, whistles and chants
that Slobodan Milošević accept electoral defeat and step down as the
country’s leader. Democratic activists, opposition leaders, and
students had overcome ten long years of authoritarian control of
government and media to bring democracy to Serbia. In the years
leading up to the revolution, student democratic activists became a
symbol of hope, courage and energy in Serbia and internationally.
October 5th marked both the high point and the end of the love affair
with these young revolutionaries. Two years later, when I began my
research with student activists, their image had been tarnished.
Former opposition members, government ministers, and media figures
dismissed student groups as at best irritating and at worst corrupt.
For many people, inside and outside the country, Serbia’s
revolutionary tale was one of hope turned to disappointment, promise
to failure. In narrating their hopes for a democratic future, people
had drawn on the images and discourses of youth protest.  “After the
Revolution”  traces the history and significance of revolutionary and
post-revolutionary political expectations in order to demonstrate how
disappointment shapes Serbia’s emerging democracy. Democratic failure
in Serbia was produced when both local and international actors judged
post-revolutionary democracy in terms of expectations generated in the
crucible of the student-led revolution. Democratic youth
revolutionaries promised positive political transformation and a more
hopeful future for Serbian citizens. But actual democracy delivered
poverty, social unrest and factional struggle. I will demonstrate how
youth and student activists have become metonymic for the movement
from hope to disappointment in newly democratic Serbia.

A reception will follow the event. All are welcome.

Anthro. Dept. Seminar Series: “The Social Life of Shrines in the Contemporary Caucasus,” Bruce Grant (NYU), February 8

THE ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT MONDAY SEMINAR SERIES
presents

Bruce Grant

Associate Professor of Anthropology
New York University

speaking on

“The Social Life of Shrines in the Contemporary Caucasus”

Monday, February 8,  3:30 pm  Haskell 315

Here is some background information

BA               1985     McGill (Anthropology)
PhD              1993    Rice (Anthropology)

2004-05  Member, School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

Interests:  Former Soviet Union, Siberia, Caucasus; Azerbaijan; (post-) Soviet nationality policies; expressive culture; state culture; nationalism; shamanism; Islam; historiography; cinema; modernism; histories of anthropology

Selected Publications

1995    In the Soviet House of Culture: A Century of Perestroikas. Princeton U Press. (Winner of the 1996 American Ethnological Society Prize for Best Book in Anthropology by a First Author.)

2009  The Captive and the Gift: Cultural Histories of Sovereignty in Russia and the Caucasus, Cornell U Press

2007   “Brides, Brigands, and Fire-Bringers: Notes Toward a Historical Ethnography of Pluralism,” IN Grant and Yalcim-Heckman, eds, Caucasus Paradigms, 47-74.

2005  “The Good Russian Prisoner: Naturalizing Violence in the Caucasus Mountains,” Cultural Anthropology 20(1): 39-67

2004  “An Average Azeri Village (1930),” Slavic Review 63(4) 705-731

2001  “New Moscow Monuments, or, States of Innocence,” American Ethnologist 28(2): 332-362.

1999  “The Return of the Repressed: Conversations with Three Russian Entrepreneurs,” in G. Marcus, ed., Paranoia within Reason: A Casebook on Conspiracy as Explanation, U Chicago Press, 241-267

1997  “Empire and Savagery: The Politics of Primitivism in Late Imperial Russia,” in Brower & Lazzerini, eds., Russia’s Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917. Indiana U Press 292-310

1993  “Dirges for Soviets Passed: Conversations with Six Russian Writers,” In G. Marcus, ed., Perilous States: Conversations on Culture, Politics, and Nation, U Chicago Press, 17-51

1993  “Siberia Hot and Cold: Reconstructing the Image of Siberian Indigenous Peoples,” in Diment & Slezkine, eds., Between Heaven and Hell: The Myth of Siberia in Russian Culture. St. Martin’s Press, 227-253.