Agitation!: A Symposium, October 14


October 14 from 9am-6:30pm at the Smart Museum of Art

Join leading scholars for a daylong public symposium that examines art and political agitation.

The symposium is presented in connection with the exhibitions Vision and Communism at the Smart Museum of Art and Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary at the Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago Library. It is part of a series of academic programs in Chicago devoted to discussing Soviet graphic arts, including a session on October 13 at Northwestern University and one on October 15 at the Art Institute of Chicago.

The full schedule for Agitation!:A Symposium is now available online at http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/symposium/.

The Symposium is presented the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art, Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies, Center for International Studies, Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures, Franke Institute for the Humanities, Special Collections Research Center, and University of Chicago Presents.

Discussion: “Shostakovich, Prokofiev and their Audiences, East and West,” Gerard McBurney (Director of CSO’s Beyond the Score), Prof. Sheila Fitzpatrick (History), Prof. Robert Bird (Slavic), May 9

CENTER FOR EAST EUROPEAN AND RUSSIAN/EURASIAN STUDIES (UCHICAGO)

Gerard McBurney on Shostakovich and Prokofiev

Mcburney Gerard 0708

“Shostakovich, Prokofiev and their Audiences, East and West”
A Conversation with Gerard McBurney (Director of CSO’s Beyond the Score), featuring Prof. Sheila Fitzpatrick (History) and Prof. Robert Bird (Slavic).

Monday
May 9, 2011
4:30 pm – 6pm

Franke Institute for the Humanities
At Regenstein Library
1100 East 57th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Soviet Arts Experience, the Department of History, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies.

For more information, or if you feel you need assistance to attend, please contact CEERES atceeres@uchicago.edu or 773-702-0875.

 

CEERES News Submission Deadline May 9

Dear CEERES Community,

CEERES is now collecting information for the Spring 2011 edition of the CEERES Newsletter. Examples of news include, but are not limited to: announcements of conferences, lectures, workshops, or new courses; information on recent publications, library acquisitions, awards, honors, exciting research or outreach endeavors; and information about any grant/funding/internship/job opportunities that might be of interest. We would also love to hear what our graduates are doing in their lives after the UofC!

To make sure that information is time-appropriate, the deadline for submissions is MONDAY, May 9th, 2011.

You can find our previous publications posted online at:http://ceeres.uchicago.edu/about/newsletter/index.shtml

Please send information to Andy Graan at apgraan@uchicago.edu. Feel free to call if you have questions or comments (702-0875). We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Best wishes,
Andy

— Andrew Graan
Outreach Coordinator
University of Chicago Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies
5835 S. Kimbark Ave., Judd Hall 321
Chicago, IL  60637
(773) 702-0875
ceeres.uchicago.edu

Concert: Alash Ensemble, Central Asian Studies Society, Ida Noyes, April 10

Alash Ensemble, master artists from the Central Asian republic of Tuva, return to Chicago for another mind-blowing concert of Tuvan throat singing and traditional and innovative music Sunday, April 10, 2011!

With an expansive repertoire of Tuvan songs about topics as diverse as good horses and good women, legends, reindeer herders, and mournful laments, Alash Ensemble’s music is riveting, beautiful, and must be heard to be believed.

Tuva is a small republic in southern Siberia and is home to a rich culture traditionally based on shamanic traditions and a pastoral nomadic lifestyle. The Tuvan language is part of the Turkic family and is of particular note to linguists for its retention of old grammatical forms and influence from Mongolian.

There is a suggested donation of at least $5 at the door that will go directly to the musicians.

Join us on the 3rd Floor Theater of Ida Noyes Hall at 7:00 PM, Sunday, April 10!

This event is open to the public. All are welcome, so please spread the word!

Fans of Central Asian, Tuvan, and Turkic language, culture, and music should be sure to come!

DON’T MISS IT!

For more about Alash Ensemble see:
http://alashensemble.com/

This event is made possible in part by the generous support of WHPK-FM, the Central Asian Studies Society (CASS), and the Center for East European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CEERES) at the University of Chicago.

Exhibit: After Chernobyl: Photographs by Michael Forster Rothbart, Harper Memorial Library Commons, March 28-May 20

COMING SOON to the University of Chicago

After Chernobyl: Photographs by Michael Forster Rothbart

In the 25th anniversary year of the Chernobyl nuclear accident, this stirring exhibit examines the everyday life and struggles of people living in the disaster’s wake.

The exhibit opens on March 28, 2011 and continues through May 20, 2011.

Exhibit Location:
Harper Memorial Library Commons, Stuart Reading Room
3rd Floor of the Harper Memorial Library Building
1116 E. 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

Public Viewing Hours:
Monday through Saturday, 9am – 6pm
Sunday, 10am – 5pm
Free Admission

When a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded in April 1986, it sent radioactive contamination across the world. In Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, 350,000 people lost their homes. Some 850,000 participated in the clean-up efforts. Now 25 years later, six million people continue to live in contaminated areas. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone remains a terra incognita: closed to the public, inaccessible, misunderstood, alternately feared and forgotten, and used as a political weapon by competing interest groups.

After Chernobyl: Photographs by Michael Forster Rothbart documents the experiences and everyday struggles of people living in the wake of Chernobyl. Through the images and stories shared in the exhibit, visitors will learn why thousands of people still work or live inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone a generation after the accident; why so many remain nearby in their radiation-affected villages; and how people cope with the unexpected life changes caused by the accident.

About the Artist:
Michael Forster Rothbart is a photojournalist, whose projects explore the human impacts of environmental change. His interactive website After Chernobyl resulted from his Fulbright year in Ukraine. After years in Ukraine, Kazakhstan and India, Forster Rothbart now lives in upstate New York and photographs for educational institutions — primarily colleges, museums, and private schools. His next documentary project, Fracking Pennsylvania, will explore the effects of natural gas drilling on rural communities.

After Chernobyl: Photographs by Michael Forster Rothbart opens on March 28, 2011 and continues through May 20, 2011.

Sponsored by the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasoan Studiesthe Center for International Studiesthe Program on the Global Environmentthe Global Health Initiativethe U of C Arts Council,Harper Memorial Library Commons, and the Soviet Arts Experience.

For more information please contact CEERES at ceeres@uchicago.edu or 773-702-0875.

 

The Exhibit Reception for “After Chernobyl: Photographs by Michael Forster Rothbart,” Harper Memorial Library Commons, April 8

The Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies invites you to:

The Exhibit Reception for “After Chernobyl: Photographs by Michael Forster Rothbart.”

Featuring Prof. Timothy Mousseau of the Chernobyl Research Initiative and the photographer Michael Forster Rothbart.

April 8th, 2011
6:00pm – 8:30pm
Harper Memorial Library Commons, Stuart Reading Room
3rd Floor of the Harper Memorial Library Building
1116 E. 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

In the 25th anniversary year of the Chernobyl nuclear accident, this stirring exhibit examines the everyday life and struggles of people living in the disaster’s wake.

At the reception, Prof. Mousseau and Mr. Forster Rothbart will each share their perspectives on the human and ecological tolls exacted by the nuclear accident at Chernobyl.

Timothy Mousseau is Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Education and Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of South Carolina. Prof. Mousseau is also on the management team of the Chernobyl Research Initiative and one of the leading scholars on the environmental and biological effects of the Chernobyl disaster.

Michael Forster Rothbart is a photojournalist, whose projects explore the human impacts of environmental change. His interactive website After Chernobyl resulted from his Fulbright year in Ukraine.

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by CEERESthe Center for International Studiesthe Program on the Global Environment,the Global Health Initiativethe U of C Arts CouncilHarper Memorial Library Commons, and the Soviet Arts Experience.

For more information, or for assistance in attending, please contact CEERES at ceeres@uchicago.eduor 773-702-0875.