Chicago Linguists at BLS

January 13th, 2015

Chicago linguists will have another strong showing at the annual meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society this year:

  • Andrea Beltrama (University of Chicago), Scale type totally matters! Intensification at the socio-semantics interface
  • Ksenia Ershova (University of Chicago), Non-canonical noun incorporation in Bzhedug Adyghe
  • Martina Martinovic & Peter Klecha (University of Chicago & Ohio State University), Exhaustivity, predication, and the semantics of movement

A full program of BLS 41 can be found here: http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/bls/bls41_schedule_01.pdf

Great job everyone!

The 2014 cohort

January 13th, 2015

 

Jessica Kantarovich graduated with a BA in Linguistics from the University of Chicago in 2012. After a 2-year stint in the thrilling world of call center consulting, she grew tired of “leveraging synergies” and decided to return to the life of the mind. Her academic interests include language contact, variation, and change, and she hopes to one day work on the documentation of an understudied language in contact with Russian (preferably someplace with better weather than Chicago, but let’s face it, it’s probably going to be the far reaches of Siberia). In her free time she enjoys baking pies, crocheting, and reading that one book she started at the beginning of the quarter.

Tran Truong received his bachelor’s degree from Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. He was born in Vietnam, which is why he cannot produce non-implosive [b, d], but was raised in Minneapolis, MN, which is why he is always asking people if they ‘wanna come with’. He is primarily interested in morphosyntax, particularly as studied from the framework of Distributed Morphology. Secondary interests include modularity, grammaticalisation, and the Mande languages. Tran manages the all-linguist intramural volleyball team, the Covert Movers (and has his sights set on managing the all-linguist intramural indoor soccer team, the Internal Subjects). His guilty pleasures include Israeli pop music and Clarke’s Diner in Hyde Park.

Orest Xherija was born in Albania and has lived most of his life in Greece. He completed undergraduate studies in the University of Chicago where he graduated with a B.A. in Mathematics. Orest’s research interests revolve around applications of mathematical and computational theories to the formal modeling of structure and meaning in natural languages. Specific topics of interest include negation and negative polarity items, quantification and focus. The languages he wishes to work on are (naturally) Albanian and Modern Greek, Turkish​,​ and Vlach, an endangered language of the Balkans. Orest’s non-academic interests include playing bouzouki (a stringed folk instrument of Greece), playing football (the non-American sort) and listening to folk music of the Balkans and Middle-East.

 

Linguistics Guru

January 7th, 2015

Masha Polinksy will be visiting the department for two weeks beginning January 13 as this year’s linguistics guru. She will be hanging out in Itamar’s office (Rosenwald 229D). Please stop by to say hi! If you want to meet with her to discuss your research, please e-mail her (mpolinsk<AT>gmail<DOT>com) directly to schedule an appointment.

Chicagoans head to LSA!

January 6th, 2015

Several Chicago linguists are presenting at the 89th annual meeting of the Linguistic Society of America in Portland, Oregon. Congratulations to all!

  • Asia Pietraszko “Discourse configurationality and agreement in Ndebele”
  • Emily Hanink “The `Missing-P’ Phenomenon in German: Free Relatives are Super Light-headed”
  • Alan Yu, Daniel Chen, Katie Franich, Yosh Halberstam, Jacob Phillips, & Betsy Pillion “The peril of sounding manly: A look at vocal characteristics of lawyers before the United States Supreme Court”
  • Stephen Matthews & Jackson Lee “The representation of Cantonese tone: evidence from music”
  • Julian Grove “Kinds and Monotonicity”
  • Gallagher Flinn “Model Fit for Cross-linguistic Asymmetries in NP-Modifier Order”
  • Peter Klecha (PhD ‘14) & Martina Martinovic “Exhaustive Identification is Predication”
  • Natasha Abner, Kensy Cooperrider, & Susan Goldin-Meadow “Creating Meaning in the Palm of Your Hand”
  • Lilia Rissman & Susan Goldin-Meadow “Morphological & lexical markers of causation in the gestures of a child homesigner”
  • Diane Rak “Phonological relations affecting phonetic productions in English-Spanish code-switching”
  • Dorothea Hoffmann “Serialization in complex predicates in MalakMalak”
  • Andrea Beltrama “A “totally awesome” trajectory. Modeling the emergence of speaker-oriented meaning.”
  • Mike Phạm & Jackson Lee “Combining successor and predecessor frequencies to model truncation in Brazilian Portuguese”
  • Natasha Abner, Savithry Namboodiripad, Elizabet Spaepen, & Susan Goldin-Meadow “Morphology in Child Homesign: Evidence from Number Marking”

 

Some Chicago linguists will also participate in the sister society meetings, which meet concurrently with the LSA:

Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics

  • Dorothea Hoffmann “Asymmetrical serial verb constructions in Kriol of Northern Australia”

Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages of the Americas

  • Lenore Grenoble & Hilary Head McMahan “Navigating the Arctic landscape: The language of place in Kalaallisut”
  • Amy Dahlstrom “Obviation and information structure in Meskwaki”
  • Cherry Meyer “Word order and information structure in Ojibwe”
  • Lenore Grenoble: Panel Chair for Otomanguean, Chocó, and Mayan
  • Adam Singerman “Negation as nominal-to-nominal derivation in Tupari”
  • Carlos Cisneros “Two analyses of floating numerals in Guaymí”

Okrent on Listicle

January 6th, 2015

Arika Okrent (PhD ’04) on “The listicle as literary form” in the Jan/Feb 14 issue of the University of Chicago Magazine.