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Archive for the Tag 'tutorials'

PowerPoint 2011

Have you upgraded to PowerPoint 2011 on your Mac, or are you thinking about upgrading? Microsoft Office for Mac has released some helpful tutorials, including general PowerPoint basics and more specific guides (like how to design your presentations using themes). A very useful PowerPoint 2008 to PowerPoint 2011 map also shows new locations of commands in the 2011 version.

If you have any questions about PowerPoint or would like to request a training appointment, please contact the VRC.

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Teaching with the iPad: Presentation Tomorrow!

Where: CSL — 2nd Floor Cobb — Room C 210

When: Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Time: 1:30 to 2:30

Steven Clancy, Senior Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literatures and Academic Director of the Center for the Study of Languages, will explore how the iPad can be used in the classroom. If you teach using a laptop computer and you are interested in using an iPad instead, you are encouraged to attend.

Unable to attend? Steven Clancy’s PowerPoint is available for download: Teaching with the iPad.

Via ġeðēode.

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Need Help Finding Images in ARTstor?

Are you looking for images to include in a class presentation or paper? The VRC is here to help!

ARTstor is a subscription library of nearly one million digital images from all disciplines. To access this database, click here. Next, click the orange Go button in the upper right corner.

You will need to login to access all of ARTstor’s features. If you have never registered with ARTstor before, click Register. You will need to provide an email address and a password. If you choose to use your UChicago email address, please do NOT provide your Cnet password (for security reasons). Select a password that you will remember.

ARTstor’s keyword search is available from the homepage. The default is to search all ARTstor collections at once.

You may want to conduct an advanced search. Under the keyword search box, click Advanced Search. You may search here by title and/or creator. Adjust Boolean operators at the left to narrow (“and”) or broaden (“or”) your search. You may also specify the geography, classification, and collection of sought images. You may specify date, but please keep in mind that art historical dates are not always included or accurate.

If you have found a relevant group of images but would like to further narrow your search, enter additional terms in the search box from the results page. Then be sure to select “Within this search result.”

You can also browse for images in ARTstor. One way to do this is by collection. From the homepage, under Browse click on Collection. Scrolling through the collections, you will get an idea of the kinds of images available in ARTstor. Click on the green folder with a plus sign next to each collection to further browse by classification. Keep clicking through to open a group of images in ARTstor.

You can also browse by Geography, Classification, or Featured Image Groups.

To search within a specific collection in ARTstor, you must browse to that collection, open the images, and then enter additional terms in the search box from the results page. For example, you might navigate to the Islamic Art and Architecture Collection by browsing, and then enter “technique” in the search box and specify “Within this category” to see images from the collection which illustrate technique.

Now that you’ve found some relevant images, you may want to return to them later. Use the Share > Generate image URL function to email yourself a link to individual images, or create an image group to access at a later time.

If you have any questions or would like to explore ARTstor further, helpful YouTube tutorials are provided. ARTstor’s Digital Library Help is always a good place to start when having technical difficulties.

To learn more about searching for images in ARTstor, please feel free to contact the VRC to schedule an appointment.

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Turn Your Mouse into a Laser Pointer

Do you use Powerpoint 2010 on a PC? If so, there’s a simple trick for turning your mouse cursor into a laser pointer. Following these instructions, from the Slide Show view you can hold down CTRL, click and hold the left mouse button, and use the pointer to illustrate your discussion. You can even change the color of the laser!

A similar function is available in Keynote for iPad (not in Keynote for Mac computers). To activate the pointer, touch and hold anywhere on your iPad screen after launching your presentation. A red and white pointer will appear and move along with your fingertips.

More information on teaching with the iPad is coming soon!

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Need Help Finding Images in LUNA?

Are you looking for images for a class presentation or paper? The VRC is here to help!

LUNA is the Department of Art History’s teaching resource of more than 165,000 digital images designed for use in conjunction with current classes. To access this database, click here. You will be prompted to login with a Cnet ID and password.

Next, you can browse the Art History Department Image Collection by clicking the center link.

Narrow your results using the What, Where, Who and When facets on the left.

Keyword search is at upper right. To do an advanced search, click the link under the keyword search box.

Limit your search to the Art History Department Image Collection, and then search any of the fields in the drop-down menu. Limiting to this collection allows searching of more specific fields, though you may find searching multiple collections useful as well.

Now that you’ve found some relevant images, you may want to return to them later. Use the Share This function to email yourself a link to your search results, or create a media group to access at a later time.

To learn more about searching for images in LUNA, please feel free to contact the VRC to schedule an appointment. We provide image searching orientation for individuals and small groups. Additional VRC-created LUNA tutorials and LUNA-provided flash tutorials are also available.

 

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Send Image Updates to VRC Staff

VRC staff members know that our faculty and students have subject expertise and can provide excellent additions to our image data. We want your contributions, and it’s easy to notify us! You can automatically generate a link to individual images or entire search results in LUNA. This function may be used to share images with VRC staff when corrections or updates are needed. Find the image or images you would like to share with VRC staff, click on the “Share This” tab, and copy the link into an email.

Please direct all image updates to visualresources@uchicago.edu.

 

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How to Bring Your Presentation to Class

As the end of the quarter approaches you will probably be presenting projects in class. Whether you’re using Powerpoint or Keynote, here are some best practices to keep in mind:

  • Load your presentation to Chalk (using the Digital Dropbox feature – click here for a PDF guide to Digital Dropbox).
  • Alternately, load your presentation to Webshare.
  • Bring a backup of your presentation on a flash drive. Flash drives are the second-best option, since not all drives are recognizable on all computers.
  • Resize images for use in Powerpoint or Keynote (to 1500 pixels on the long side). This will reduce file size and ensure your presentation loads quickly.
  • Be sure to always insert images from your computer by selecting Insert > Picture in Powerpoint. Dragging and dropping images creates links in some versions of Powerpoint (rather than actually copying the image), which is a problem if you use a different computer to present.
  • If your presentation contains video, be sure to save copies of those video files and load them to Chalk/Webshare or bring them on a flash drive. Videos display differently in different presentation tools and sometimes these slides may need to be re-inserted.

If you have any questions, please contact the VRC!

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Using the University of Chicago VPN

Have you ever had trouble accessing LUNA or ARTstor off-campus? Try using the University of Chicago VPN. The VPN (virtual private network) allows UChicago faculty, staff and students access to restricted services from any computer. Logging into LUNA or ARTstor after connecting to the VPN ensures access even if your ARTstor 120-day off-campus “grace period” has expired.

To connect to the VPN, just point your browser to http://cvpn.uchicago.edu. You will need a Cnet ID and password. The first time you connect, the VPN will install some software; you will need administrative privileges on your computer to complete this process.

Via IT Services.

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Photographing Archival Materials

Before embarking on a research trip, you might prepare to photograph materials in libraries and archives. It can be difficult to capture quality images of archival materials, especially in low-light situations. A recent guest post on ProfHacker details one way of stabilizing a digital camera, which includes using a clamp, articulated arm and wired camera remote as a sort of portable copy stand.

Keep in mind that some of the processes advocated in the article will not be allowed in all archives or libraries. Check with archives, museums or libraries before your visit to ask about policies; most will have specific requirements for equipment used in reading rooms. If you have questions about cameras or other photography best practices, please contact the VRC.

Via Derivative Image.

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Optimal Mac Settings for Projection in CWAC

Have you had trouble getting presentations to look good in CWAC classrooms? Are images too dark, or the wrong size? The following tips will solve most projection problems and work best for MacBook Pros. Knowing how to adjust your resolution, mirroring and color profile will help you when presenting outside of CWAC, too, since every projector is a little different.

Please Note: In CWAC, we recommend turning off at least the first two rows of lights closest to the screen for maximum color accuracy and brightness.

We now have VGA and HDMI connections (with adapters for Mac!) You might consider trying HDMI for the best color and clarity.

First, select System Preferences from the Apple menu at the top left of your Finder toolbar. Then click on Displays.

When this window opens, you can check “Show displays in menu bar” if you would like a shortcut to Displays in your Finder menu. Next, adjust your ExtronScalerA (Projector) resolution. We recommend 1900 x 1080 (or as high as your monitor will allow) at 60 Hz.

Now adjust your Color LCD (Laptop) resolution to 1440 x 900.

Go back to the VGA Display window and select the Arrangement tab. Check or uncheck the box as you prefer (if you would like to project exactly what is on your laptop screen, check Mirror Displays. If you would like to show a Powerpoint presentation with presenter notes, or drag only one window to the projector screen at a time, uncheck this box).

Finally, click on the Color tab. Switch profile to sRGB IEC61966-2.1. This should correct images that are appearing dark or muddled. If sRGB IEC61966-2.1 is not showing up on your list, be sure that the box “Show profiles for this display only” is NOT checked.

For a MacBook, settings are the same as above except the Color LCD (Laptop) resolution should be set at 1280 x 800.

Click here to read more about this topic. If you have trouble setting up a different kind of laptop, or if you have any questions, please contact the VRC or AV Services.

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