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Archive for the Tag 'preservation'

Artists Documentation Program

The Artists Documentation Program (ADP) interviews artists and their close associates in order to gain a better understanding of their materials, working techniques, and intent for conservation of their works. All interviews are conducted by conservators in a museum or studio setting.

To view the interviews, you must register and log in after agreeing to the ADP Acceptable Use Policy. Registration is free.

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Celebrate Preservation Week!

Did you know? This week is National Preservation Week. From April 24-30, the Library of Congress and libraries around the nation will provide guidance in preserving digital images and other files.

Thursday, April 28th the Library of Congress is hosting a free webinar at 1pm Central Time titled Preserving Your Personal Digital Memories. Registration is required, and the form is available here.

Digital photos, electronic documents, and other new media are fragile and require special care to keep them useable. But preserving digital information is a new concept that most people have little experience with. As new technologies appear for creating and saving our personal digital information, older ones become obsolete, making it difficult to access older content. Learn about the nature of the problem and hear about some simple, practical tips and tools to help you keep your digital memories safe.

As always, if you have any questions about managing your digital images, please contact the VRC.

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Early Silent Films Return to America for Preservation

Early silent films recently discovered in the New Zealand Film Archive are returning to the United States for preservation under the guidance of the National Film Preservation Foundation. About seventy-five films were chosen because of their historical significance, including John Ford’s Upstream and a Clara Bow period drama. Shipment and preservation of the films has been difficult and time-consuming; most are printed on highly-flammable nitrate film and are already in advanced stages of deterioration. Preserved films will eventually be made public as streaming videos on the foundation’s website. For more information, see this article from the New York Times.

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