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Archivision: New, Expanded Content in LUNA

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The VRC recently added more than 65,000 images from the Archivision Collection to LUNA. The collection focuses on architecture, archaeological sites, gardens, parks, and other works of art from all over the world and throughout history. The collection curated by Scott Gilchrist, an architect and photographer.

Check it out here, and let us know what you think!

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Roman Ruins iPad App

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Historvius (a travel company focused on historic sites) recently launched a new iPad app that explores Roman Ruins.

The app features more than 100 individual Roman sites from around the world, and includes more than 1,500 images, Google Streetviews of select sites, and 3D aerial views. Users can browse the app by site name, country, or a map, but there is no keyword search. The site has curated galleries and collections, so pulling up examples of Roman baths, arenas, or mosaics is easy.

Although the app aims to help travelers, the many high quality images and especially the street and aerial views of sites makes it appealing to those studying Roman art. Stop by the VRC and check out Roman Ruins!

Via Digital Meets Culture

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ARTstor Mobile’s Flashcard Feature

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Just in time for finals! You can use image groups in ARTstor to quiz yourself for Image ID tests when you’re using ARTstor on a mobile device. The image groups can be saved in your own personal work folder, or be in an institutional group that your instructor created for you.

After opening the image group, open an image, and click the link below that reads “Switch to Flash Card.” This will allow you to click through the images in the group without providing caption information. In order to bring up the caption information, tap the center of the image. To move back and forth in the image group, use the left and right arrows.

To check out the flashcard feature, navigate to ARTstor Mobile on your device and get studying!

Via ARTstor Blog

 

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LACMA Releases Online Catalog of Southeast Asian Art

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The Los Angeles County Museum of Art recently released a new online scholarly catalog on Southeast Asian Art. This digital publication is to be the first in a series that LACMA hopes to use to bring catalogs previously only existing in print to the web, where they can be freely available.

The Southeast Asian Art catalog features catalog entries on 34 objects from LACMA’s permanent collection as well as four thematic essays and a glossary. Users can access the content through LACMA’s Reading Room website, or download parts or all of the catalog as a PDF.

Via ArtDaily

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VRC Has New Adapter to Project from iPad Mini!

No small deal about it: the VRC now has a new adapter to project from an iPad Mini in CWAC classrooms. The HDMI adapter allows for picture and sound projection.

To reserve this adapter or others, please contact the VRC at visualresources@uchicago.edu.

For more information, please see our page on Classroom Technology.

 

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The Irving Penn Archives at the Art Institute

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The Art Institute of Chicago holds the paper and photographic archives of Irving Penn (1917–2009), a leading photographer of the 20th century. In addition, the Art Institute also has more than 200 fine art prints by Penn, and in Spring 2012 the museum launched a website to unite photographs from the Department of Photography with archival materials from the Irving Penn Archives, housed in the museum’s Ryerson and Burnham Library and Archives.

The website presents access to newly digitized archival materials, much of which was previously not discoverable online, and presents a series of thematic essays along with a host of research resources, including timelines, bibliographies, and more, and robust cataloging information about each fine art print, including inscriptions and publication and exhibition histories.

For more information or to view the website, visit the Irving Penn Archives. Click here for a direct link to the visual content of the website, including fine art prints, digitized material from the photographic archives including test prints and contact sheets, and digitized material from the paper archives including Irving Penn’s notebooks and technical printing information.

 

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Luminous Lint

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Luminous Lint is an expansive photography resource that includes images and text about historic and contemporary photographic practice, as well as artist biographies, styles and movements, thematic content, information about printing techniques and processes, and chronological information about the history of the medium.

The website also features images of artworks as well as artists’ monographs, making it a great starting place to research photographers or photographic movements.

For more information, check out Luminous Lint!

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The Morgan Begins Digitizing 10,000 Drawings

The Morgan Library and Museum in New York recently announced that it is embarking on a year-long program to digitize its collection of more than 10,000 master drawings (including 2,000 versos) dating from the 14th to 21st centuries. The images will be available in a digital library that will provide a robust catalog record with a high resolution image. The digital library will be open to the public, and images will be available for download for use in non-commercial situations including “classroom presentations, dissertations, and educational websites devoted to the fine arts.”

So, get excited about the new digital library, which will hopefully be ready for launch in October 2014. The Morgan has future plans to digitize their print collection, which would be another fantastic resource.

For more information about the project, check out the Morgan’s press release. In the meantime, don’t forget that the Morgan has other valuable online resources available now, including Collection Highlights, Online Exhibitions, and Music Manuscripts.

Via ArtDaily

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Penn Museum’s Digital Resources for Archaeology and Anthropology

The Penn Museum in Philadelphia, the University of Pennslyvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, recently launched two new digital endeavors for researchers.

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The newly revamped Collections Database includes more than 690,000 objects and more than 95,000 images. The database records are robust, with links to related objects and bibliographic citations of where the image has been published.

The Penn Museum also allows users to download data files of its object records under a Creative Commons license. You can download datasets on all objects or by cultural group, including African, American, Asian, Egyptian, European, Historic, Mediterranean, Near Eastern, and Oceanian. The datasets include physical information, its provenance, and materialiaty but not images of the objects and the objects’ publication and exhibition histories.

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The Research Map and Timeline provides interactive documentation and information about the museum’s research expeditions and projects since the 1880s. Users can browse projects geographically or chronologically, and the website provides a record of the dates, researchers, and time period studied as well as a brief description of the work done and key discoveries.

Via ArtDaily

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As more information surfaces about the treasure trove of 1,500 looted works found hidden in Munich, the VRC will be following the story closely in hopes that quality images and information about the artworks become available.

So far the New York Times has posted a slideshow of 8 images, and other news websites are showing the same set.For more information, visit the NYT’s articles on the discovery:

German Officials Provide Details on Looted Art (11/5) and Documents Reveal How Looted Nazi Art Was Restored to Dealer (11/6)

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