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Archive for the 'Museums' Category

30 Years of Tate’s ‘Audio Arts’ Online

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The Tate recently released 30 years of Audio Arts, the “innovative audio cassette-magazine … established by Bill Furlong in 1972.”

Users can browse by category, chronology, or contributor, including inimitable figures such as Joseph Beuys, Marina Abramovc, Bruce McLean, Gehrard Richter, and more.

Check out the Audio Arts archive online!

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e-Museum of Japan

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Looking for images of works of art in the National Museums of Japan? This e-Museum collection of “National Treasures & Important Cultural Properties” contains hundreds of high quality reproductions, robust metadata, and descriptive content. Users can zoom and and pan through images, browse by categories including painting, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture, textiles, ceramics, and more. The site features a keyword and an advanced search.

In addition, iPhone and Android apps exist for the e-Museum collection.

For more information, explore the e-Museum of Japan!

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Delaware Art Museum Launches Collections Website

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The Delaware Art Museum recently launched a collections website via eMuseum which currently features more than 1,000 works of art. By 2018, the museum’s entire collection will be online, “including the largest collection of British Pre-Raphaelite art outside of the United Kingdom …”

Users can interact with the Collections tab by browsing curated collections, searching for individual object records and related artist biographies. Creating an account will allow users to select favorite records and save image groups and research notes.

For more information, visit the link to the Delaware Art Museum’s eMuseum collection or their Collections page.

Via ArtDaily.

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Dumbarton Oaks Launches New Online Inventory

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Dumbarton Oaks’ Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives has launched a new online inventory called AtoM@DO, which brings together the holdings from the ICFA as well as a selection from teh Dumbarton Oaks Archives for users to search for related materials across the institution.

The ICFA contains materials pertaining to Byzantine and Medieval art, architecture and archaeology; Pre-Columbian cultural heritage, and the Garden & Landscape collections.

For more information, search AtoM@DO or visit the ICFA.

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Getty Launches Free Virtual Library with 250 Titles

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The Getty just launched its Virtual Library, the newest project in their Open Content Program. The Virtual Library makes more than 250 publications freely available to read online or to download a PDF in its entirety. The books are from the Getty Conservation Institute, the Getty Research Institute, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, and include exhibition catalogs, translations, and journals among others.

Users can browse the site by publishing program, type, subject, or series, and there are also title, author, and keyword searches. The record for each title in the Virtual Library also includes a WorldCat link so users may find the title in a local library or request it through ILL.

For more information or to explore the collection, check out the Getty’s Virtual Library!

Via The Getty Iris and ArtDaily.

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Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Makes Gift of Shunk and Kender Archives

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The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation recently announced that it is donating nearly 200,000 items from the Harry Shunk and Shunk-Kender Archives to five international institutions. The archival materials include black-and-white prints, color prints, negatives, contact sheets, and color transparencies, and will be distributed to the Getty Research Institute, the Museum of the Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Centre Pompidou, and the Tate. The Foundation’s gift marks the first time an artist’s foundation has devoted its resources to the work of other artists.

Harry Shunk (1924–2006, born in Germany) and János [Jean] Kender (1937–2009, born in Hungary) made the bulk of their images from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, documenting more than 400 artists in their studios, at openings, and during performances, making this collection an important documentary collection of the modern art and art history. Artists depicted include Roy Lichtenstein, Vito Acconci, Joseph Beuys, Alexander Calder, Eva Hesse, Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Man Ray, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol among many others.

After Shunk died in 2006, the Foundation began acquiring the archive by purchase between 2008 and 2012. After acquiring the images, the Foundation “preserved, cataloged, and digitized the images” and made them available in an online collection on their website. You can view the archive’s list of artists to view PDFs of thumbnails that depict that specific artist. For information about using the images in scholarly publications, contact Shunk-Copyright@lichtensteinfoundation.org.

For more information or to check out the collection, visit the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Photography Archives.

Via ArtDaily.

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South Side Community Art Center Now Publicly Available in LUNA

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Over the summer, the VRC announced that images of artworks held by the South Side Community Art Center were newly added to our LUNA database. We’re now thrilled to announce that the collection has been made publicly available in LUNA, so anyone can access the more than 350 images!

To view the collection, click here. For more information, see our previous post about the SSCAC’s collection.

 

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Images from the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

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The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO provides images (up to 1536 pixels) of objects in their collections to users free of charge for educational purposes only. Images can be found on their website under Search the Collection. To place an order for digital images of collection images for teaching and research, request them via email at nebersole@nelson-atkins.org or via their Library’s Contact Us form (be sure to select Visual Resources Library in the Subject/Department drop-down list). The library will send you the requested images via email.

The Nelson-Atkins also contributed 15 scrolling paintings to our Digital Scrolling Paintings website—you can view them here.

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Imaging the Imagists at the Smart Museum

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The Smart Museum of Art received a grant from the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation to greatly expand access and preservation of its collection of Chicago Imagist works on paper. The Smart was able to mount, conserve, and/or photograph 437 works, add 407 new images to their online collections database, expand 51 artwork texts (which can be now viewed in the online catalog records) and interview 3 artists.

The interviews with artists Barbara Rossi, Suellen Rocca, and Karl Wirsum are available online through the Smart’s Vimeo channel (and also on an iPad in the Joan and Robert Feitler Gallery for Contemporary Art through August 2014).

To view the newly added images in the Smart’s collections website, the best way to search is by artist name. After completing the grant work, the following Imagist artists are represented on their website:

Roger Brown, Art Green, Philip Hanson, Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, Ed Paschke, Suellen Rocca, Barbara Rossi, Karl Wirsum, Don Baum, and the Hairy Who.

If you’re in the area, be sure to visit the current exhibition at the Smart, State of Mind and sister show Bridging California and Chicago which features Chicago Imagist works.

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The Morgan Begins Digitizing 10,000 Drawings

The Morgan Library and Museum in New York recently announced that it is embarking on a year-long program to digitize its collection of more than 10,000 master drawings (including 2,000 versos) dating from the 14th to 21st centuries. The images will be available in a digital library that will provide a robust catalog record with a high resolution image. The digital library will be open to the public, and images will be available for download for use in non-commercial situations including “classroom presentations, dissertations, and educational websites devoted to the fine arts.”

So, get excited about the new digital library, which will hopefully be ready for launch in October 2014. The Morgan has future plans to digitize their print collection, which would be another fantastic resource.

For more information about the project, check out the Morgan’s press release. In the meantime, don’t forget that the Morgan has other valuable online resources available now, including Collection Highlights, Online Exhibitions, and Music Manuscripts.

Via ArtDaily

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