Session ideas so far

November 16th, 2010 |

Computational processes applied to a growing archive of scholarship linked with rhetoric and composition

Conceptual value of data-mining and visualization for apprehending patterns that are not obvious at the customary scales of reading (e.g., one article at a time).

The relationship between databases and narratives, particularly for field narratives (sometimes called discipliniographies or stories of disciplinary emergence and status). What role have databases played in shaping these narratives?

Issues of metadata proprietorship (e.g., how does copyright apply to mined data?), metadata standards, and processing methods

Writing and rhetoric, new media and undergraduate writing curricula, assessment, pedagogy, and interdisciplinary partnerships.

Cross-institutional collaborations in the digital humanities. How can scholars at smaller institutions (or larger institutions without an established DH program) find partners to collaborate with on digital projects, and how can we build a more robust infrastructure to support such collaboration?

A campus Digital Commons with individual and project websites, blogs, wikis and social networking tools

How scholars work with the digital humanities tools and resources that have been developed, and how they incorporate them into their research workflows

How do we best use videoconferencing tools, social media, and podcasting techniques to keep the group academically stimulating, fresh, and inclusive? What are the possibilities offered by tools like Anthologize, Twitter, and Omeka?

Exploring the possibilities of a digital dissertation and scholarly collaboration via the web.

Generating new ideas for language preservation

Mashups, remixes, and physical computing using Processing and the Arduino; using Processing as a first programming language

Gamification: going beyond the replication of achievement systems or the inclusion of experience points for mundane activities and thinking about the ways that game structures, particularly narratives, can be used to give actions not only clear rewards but also greater meaning.

Digital portfolios: pedagogical, project, and collaborative uses

How the ThatCamp model encourages playfulness that traditional conferences decidedly lack, and what we can do about that disconnect

Exploring models for international collaboration in the documentation of the arts, as well as in methods for overcoming institutional, political, and intellectual property barriers to build and provide access to collections of contemporary digital materials

Exploring creative ways of providing access to special collections and archives, both from the perspective of the archivist and the scholar

The role of expertise in such [crowdsourcing] systems. Even in functionally egalitarian systems, how do users elect authority or recognize expertise? Do such actions work to the benefit or the detriment of the task, and is there a balance that can be struck?

Luddic labour. Along the crowdsourcing line, how can the spirit of play be captured toward meaningful task. Systems like ReCaptcha and the ESP Game were inspiring early examples, but there has not been nearly enough attention on such things in the traditional venues.

Geographical information systems as teaching aids and alternate means of assessment

Creating a database of nineteenth-century German novel production, which will hopefully end up being searchable both in traditional ways (titles, number of books published per year, etc.) and through a GIS interface (visualization of places of publication, etc.).

Teaching ‘hard skills’ to academics

Using DH tools to work with higher-ed assessment issues in the humanities

I would like to know much more about current ways of using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in the humanities.

Digital memory and persuasive technologies: bio art, cognition v. consciousness, and memory creation through technologies

The efficacy of Alternate Reality Games (ARG) in education, focusing both on the learning results (can we use ARGs in the classroom to teach, for example, information literacy and STEM content?) and from a design perspective (how do novices set about designing learning games?

Presenting complex encyclopedic texts with not just digital scholarly editions, but more interactive, transmedia models of textual engagement.

Understanding music notation traditions as cognitive tool — how ambiguity begets participation, how all actors become participants in the ongoing process of understanding a musical work, the nature of musical thinking and the potential role of a generative visualization system as a partner in that process, how to possibly account for the endless variety of musics, traditions, and grammars by defining simple primitives, and what the ideal utility and design of a platform-independent, highly-automated, flexible, and modular structure that supports use-dependent goals and future expansion might look like.

Researching ARGs as games,  as interactive narratives, and as sites of “new media” literacies

Use the tools of digital humanities to examine discursive assessment of student work — What if we designed a way to collect textual commentary on student work and analyzed the commentary along with ratings? There are loads of questions one could answer with such information, especially if cleverly designed. Instead of focusing on specific research questions, this session would focus on a package of tools and a practical how-to guide for designing such studies.

The future of the book and textbook, digital literacy practices, and the possibilities for teaching and learning with Digital Humanities tools

Spambots and the software used to filter them

“Yes, I do study virtual worlds, games, Facebook, etc., and yes, I am a serious scholar.”

Comments Feed

5 Responses to “Session ideas so far”

  1. Sherman Dorn Says:

    One missing from this list (as of Wednesday 3pm CST): Using DH tools to work with higher-ed assessment issues in the humanities.

  2. Andrea Guzman Says:

    I would like to propose “Yes, I do study virtual worlds, games, Facebook, etc., and yes, I am a serious scholar.” I still get weird looks from some professors, my fellow grad students, and my undergraduate students when I explain my research interests.

  3. Ryan Cordell Says:

    Looking at the proposals, I see a few possible panels forming. Let me suggest a few groupings, and second Andrea’s wonderful idea to bring the games theory folk together. This list isn’t perfect; please suggest modifications or wholesale revisions.

    Texts & Visualization

    Conceptual value of data-mining and visualization for apprehending patterns that are not obvious at the customary scales of reading (e.g., one article at a time).
    Creating a database of nineteenth-century German novel production, which will hopefully end up being searchable both in traditional ways (titles, number of books published per year, etc.) and through a GIS interface (visualization of places of publication, etc.).
    Presenting complex encyclopedic texts with not just digital scholarly editions, but more interactive, transmedia models of textual engagement.
    The future of the book and textbook, digital literacy practices, and the possibilities for teaching and learning with Digital Humanities tools
    Issues of metadata proprietorship (e.g., how does copyright apply to mined data?), metadata standards, and processing methods

    Gaming in Academia

    Gamification: going beyond the replication of achievement systems or the inclusion of experience points for mundane activities and thinking about the ways that game structures, particularly narratives, can be used to give actions not only clear rewards but also greater meaning.
    The efficacy of Alternate Reality Games (ARG) in education, focusing both on the learning results (can we use ARGs in the classroom to teach, for example, information literacy and STEM content?) and from a design perspective (how do novices set about designing learning games?
    Researching ARGs as games, as interactive narratives, and as sites of “new media” literacies
    “Yes, I do study virtual worlds, games, Facebook, etc., and yes, I am a serious scholar.”

    Databases, Preservation, and Cultural Memory

    The relationship between databases and narratives, particularly for field narratives (sometimes called discipliniographies or stories of disciplinary emergence and status). What role have databases played in shaping these narratives?
    Generating new ideas for language preservation
    Digital memory and persuasive technologies: bio art, cognition v. consciousness, and memory creation through technologies
    Exploring creative ways of providing access to special collections and archives, both from the perspective of the archivist and the scholar

    Collaboration in DH

    Cross-institutional collaborations in the digital humanities. How can scholars at smaller institutions (or larger institutions without an established DH program) find partners to collaborate with on digital projects, and how can we build a more robust infrastructure to support such collaboration?
    Exploring the possibilities of a digital dissertation and scholarly collaboration via the web.
    Exploring models for international collaboration in the documentation of the arts, as well as in methods for overcoming institutional, political, and intellectual property barriers to build and provide access to collections of contemporary digital materials

    (A related idea) Crowdsourcing DH Work

    How scholars work with the digital humanities tools and resources that have been developed, and how they incorporate them into their research workflows
    The role of expertise in such [crowdsourcing] systems. Even in functionally egalitarian systems, how do users elect authority or recognize expertise? Do such actions work to the benefit or the detriment of the task, and is there a balance that can be struck?
    Luddic labour. Along the crowdsourcing line, how can the spirit of play be captured toward meaningful task. Systems like ReCaptcha and the ESP Game were inspiring early examples, but there has not been nearly enough attention on such things in the traditional venues.

    Computation, Notation, and Composition

    Computational processes applied to a growing archive of scholarship linked with rhetoric and composition
    Understanding music notation traditions as cognitive tool — how ambiguity begets participation, how all actors become participants in the ongoing process of understanding a musical work, the nature of musical thinking and the potential role of a generative visualization system as a partner in that process, how to possibly account for the endless variety of musics, traditions, and grammars by defining simple primitives, and what the ideal utility and design of a platform-independent, highly-automated, flexible, and modular structure that supports use-dependent goals and future expansion might look like.
    Mashups, remixes, and physical computing using Processing and the Arduino; using Processing as a first programming language

    DH & Assessment

    Geographical information systems as teaching aids and alternate means of assessment
    Use the tools of digital humanities to examine discursive assessment of student work — What if we designed a way to collect textual commentary on student work and analyzed the commentary along with ratings? There are loads of questions one could answer with such information, especially if cleverly designed. Instead of focusing on specific research questions, this session would focus on a package of tools and a practical how-to guide for designing such studies.
    Using DH tools to work with higher-ed assessment issues in the humanities

    Tools, Training, and DH Innovation

    I would like to know much more about current ways of using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in the humanities.
    Teaching ‘hard skills’ to academics
    How do we best use videoconferencing tools, social media, and podcasting techniques to keep the group academically stimulating, fresh, and inclusive? What are the possibilities offered by tools like Anthologize, Twitter, and Omeka?
    A campus Digital Commons with individual and project websites, blogs, wikis and social networking tools
    How the ThatCamp model encourages playfulness that traditional conferences decidedly lack, and what we can do about that disconnect

  4. Chris Dickman Says:

    Ryan, your session groupings look good to me; I’m even more excited now that I see these ideas come together.

    I’d like to second and even expand on Andrea’s suggestion of, well, explaining our work to others. One of the many reasons I wanted to come to a THATCamp was so I could go back and tell my colleagues about the incredible work being done (I’m one of those lone DH’ers/EdTech’ers at a smaller University). But Andrea’s right, that’s hard to explain sometimes. It might be useful, then, to talk about how we can be good ambassadors.

    But maybe we can say more. I certainly agree in principle with the “Rise of Methodology” and impetus to “do” rather than theorize (perhaps stated most succinctly by Tom Scheinfeldt on his blog and comments elsewhere); that ethos is propelling my own dissertation. But it sometimes seems that the focus on doing and tool creation is preempting a conversation about how these tools will help and why we’re making them – why they are good for the humanities. I have no doubt that they are, but I just don’t see that conversation happening as much as I’d like. As Anthony Grafton said in the NY Times article posted on the blog here: “It’s easy to forget the digital media are means and not ends.” I think We may understand both the means and the ends, but non-DH Humanists often see the means merely as “play” or “interesting” if we can’t cogently express our projects and their rationale to others.

    Such a session might be considered outside the realm of THATCamp proper, so would it be possible to have an “After CAMP,” say around libations at a local establishment? There, people could talk a little about their projects and what they see as the ends, which we could pass along to others when we get back to our institutions.

  5. mmacken Says:

    briefly, other ideas that have come up: dork shorts, xtf, digital repositories, html5, css3