Photo-Journal Entry for new CKP Gardens

 

Take a look at these pictures of our Timuel D. Black Diversity Garden in progress!  The garden is being improved almost daily, and these pictures are not the most recent, but  they give an idea of how the garden is developing.

 

This is the central focus of the new edible plant demonstration garden CKP is building at 5710 S. Woodlawn in honor of Timuel Black.

This is the central focus of the new edible plant demonstration garden CKP is building at 5710 S. Woodlawn in honor of Timuel Black.

 

 

 

We used locally recycled glass to create rivers which evoke Bridges of Memory - the title of Dr. Black's book.
We used locally recycled glass to create rivers which evoke Bridges of Memory – the title of Dr. Black’s book.

 

A wider view of the garden, with our landscaper Julia Govis.

A wider view of the garden, with our landscaper Julia Govis.

On Tuesday the Donoghue School Garden was planted, as announced on this blog, and here are a few pictures of the students’ accomplishments.

 

Here is the garden viewed from the east.  In the foreground are beans and squash planted by the fifth graders in coordination with their unit on Native Americans.

Here is the garden viewed from the east. In the foreground are beans and squash planted by the fifth graders in coordination with their unit on Native Americans.

 

The beds have a layer of paper beneath them to kill weeds, just as the walkways have the plastic to discourage grass from creeping into the healthy organic compost we used for the beds.

The beds have a layer of paper beneath them to kill weeds, just as the walkways have the plastic to discourage grass from creeping into the healthy organic compost we used for the beds.

 

Citiyear painted these stepping stones, which are now adapted to provide a walkway through the courtyard into the garden.

Citiyear painted these stepping stones, which are now adapted to provide a walkway through the courtyard into the garden.

 

The students grew these potato plants from chunks of potato in their science classroom.

The students grew these potato plants from chunks of potato in their science classroom.

 

Stay tuned for more pictures and news about these two gardens, and let us know if you need help or advice starting an edible garden of your own!  Teachers, parents, and students, please do take a look at our Garden Manual for practical and philosophical tips on starting a school garden.  If the Donoghue School can do it, so can you!  Our Sustainability Partners Network, which can be found at http://civicknowledge.uchicago.edu/sustainability.shtml (at the bottom of the page), includes many people and organizations who can help schools start gardens.  Do contact the CKP at cdonnelly@uchicago.edu or rschultz@uchicago.edu if you have any questions about how or why to start a school garden.  We welcome your questions and comments and look forward to hearing from you!

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