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Initially launched as a new program for the 2010-11 academic year, Poverty, Promise, and Possibility promises to become an ongoing cooperative effort by the Civic Knowledge Project and its partners. The aim will be to build on the progress made in this first phase of the program by continuing to bring together University and community expertise in addressing the most pressing social problems confronting us here on the South Side of Chicago. Working with the Office of Civic Engagement, the School of Social Service Administration, the Urban Education Institute, the Graham School of General Studies, and a wide range of community partners, we promise to produce accessible, first-rate and useable knowledge and educational materials that will measurably improve the quality of life for our communities for generations to come and underscore the vital role of the humanities in making life worth living.

The inaugural program, for the 2010-11 academic year is as follows:

This initiative from the University of Chicago represents a bold and timely effort to bring together the University’s scholarly resources on issues of poverty in new, more publicly accessible, and more socially relevant ways. The aim is to highlight the useable knowledge available through the University for the purpose of illuminating both the pressing problems of poverty in our area and the practical steps that local communities can take to address such problems. The University’s demonstrated commitment to working with community partners on urgent social issues such as poverty has set the stage for this new initiative, which is designed to foster the larger cooperative ethic of civic friendship that the University seeks to realize in its relationships with a rich array of Chicago neighborhoods and communities.

To RSVP for the Public Discussions or register for the courses, please contact Bart Schultz, the Director of the Civic Knowledge Project, at rschultz@uchicago.edu or 773-702-8821. Poverty, Promise, and Possibility is a collaborative initiative featuring many partners, including the University of Chicago’s Office of Civic Engagement, Graham School of General Studies, Humanities Division/Civic Knowledge Project, Urban Education Institute, and School of Social Service Administration.

FREE PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS

Note: All the Public Discussions will be held on the Hyde Park campus of the University of Chicago at the School of Social Service Administration, 969 E. 60th St.

POVERTY: A SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
Chad Broughton, senior lecturer in Public Policy Studies and faculty director of the Chicago Studies Program at the University of Chicago. 6:30-8 pm, Thursday, September 30, 2010.

POVERTY AND THE HUMANITIES
Earl Shorris, founder of the Clemente Course in the Humanities and a National Humanities Medalist. 12-1:30 pm, Thursday, October 21, 2010.

POVERTY AND URBAN SCHOOLING
Timothy Knowles, John Dewey Director and Clinical Professor, the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute. 6:30-8 pm, Thursday, November 11, 2010.

THE SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF URBAN HEALTH
Eric E. Whitaker, Executive Vice President for Strategic Affiliations and Associate Dean for Community-Based Research, University of Chicago Medical Center. 6:30-8 pm Wednesday, December 1, 2010.

REFORMING URBAN SCHOOLS AT SCALE
Charles Payne, the Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. 6:30-8 pm, Thursday, January 20, 2011.

COMMUNITY FORUM
A panel discussion featuring distinguished representatives from leading community organizations in Chicago involved in the development of Promise Zone initiatives. 6:30-8 pm, Thursday, March 3, 2011.

PLACES IN NEED: THE CHANGING GEOGRAPHY OF POVERTY IN THE U.S.
Scott Allard, associate professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. 6:30-8 pm, Thursday, April 7, 2011.

COMMUNITY FORUM
A panel discussion featuring distinguished representatives from leading community organizations in Chicago involved in the development of Promise Zone initiatives and other innovative approaches to the problem of urban poverty. 6:30-8pm, Thursday, May 12, 2011.

POVERTY, UNDEREMPLOYMENT, AND FAMILY HARDSHIP: THE REALITIES OF TODAY’S LABOR MARKET FOR CHICAGO’S FAMILIES
Susan Lambert and Julia Henly, associate professors at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. 6:30-8 pm, Wednesday, May 25, 2011.

POVERTY, INEQUALITY, AND THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT: POLITICS, PRACTICES, AND POSSIBILITIES
Evelyn Brodkin, associate professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, 6:30-8 pm, Thursday, June 9

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES
To facilitate community participation throughout the program, discounted registration for the entire course series is available. By signing up for the series, registrants will not only get four courses for the price of three, but also be guaranteed priority seating at the public discussions and a special role in facilitating the summer Institute.

Entire Series: Course Code LAHPPP; Section 10A1
Autumn-Summer 2010-11
$625 Regular registration
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 46

Individuals or organizations needing special tuition assistance should contact Bart Schultz, at 773-702-8821 or rschultz@uchicago.edu, to inquire about Civic Knowledge Project scholarship opportunities. Note: all courses will be held on the Hyde Park Campus of the University of Chicago.

THE FACE OF URBAN COMMUNITIES
This course will provide participants with the opportunity to consider the process of development and decline in urban communities. Drawing from rich ethnographic studies, we will explore some of the influences on the trajectory of urban neighborhoods, such as historical restrictive covenants, depopulation, high-rise projects and segregation. Particular attention will be paid to depictions of racial, ethnic, class, and cultural identities. This mini-course provides a foundation for the Poverty, Promise and Possibility program.

SARA STOELINGA
Ms. Stoelinga is director of planning and program development at the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago. This course will be held at Chapin Hall, 1313 E. 60th St.

Course Code LAHPPP; Section 10A2
Summer-Autumn 2010
$200 Regular registration
Wednesdays, August 18-September 8, 4-6:30 pm
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 10

POVERTY AND THE HUMANITIES IN CHICAGO
This course will provide an in-depth account of the use of humanities programming in efforts to combat poverty, focusing especially on the worldwide Clemente Course in the Humanities, known in Chicago as the Odyssey Project. The problems of poverty are not limited to shortages of material resources but can also include being cut-off from the cultural resources needed for achieving a dignified and fully meaningful life. The Clemente Course, founded by National Humanities Medalist Earl Shorris, and related efforts demonstrate how even in very difficult circumstances the humanities have a vital role to play.

BART SCHULTZ AND ERIKA DUDLEY
Mr. Schultz is senior lecturer in the Humanities and director of the Civic Knowledge Project at the University of Chicago. Ms. Dudley is the Civic Knowledge Project coordinator for parent education, the Odyssey Project & the Educating Community.

Course Code: LAHPPP; Section 10A3
Autumn 2010
$185 Regular registration
Wednesdays, October 27-November 17, 6:00-8:00 pm
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 8

ONE DAY WORKSHOP: UNDERSTANDING YOUTH VIOLENCE: A DISCUSSION WITH RUDY NIMOCKS
Rudy Nimocks is a University of Chicago senior statesman. A veteran of the Chicago Police Department, where he achieved the rank of deputy superintendent, and the chief of the University of Chicago Police Department for decades, he has in recent years become the University’s Director of Community Partnerships, where his talent for working with troubled youth has proved singularly valuable. A 58 year resident of the Woodlawn neighborhood, he has been called “both a community and University treasure,” and in this very special workshop he will share lessons from his long experience in dealing with urban youth crime and violence.

RUDY NIMOCKS
Mr. Nimocks is Director of Community Partnerships at the University of Chicago

Course Code LAHPPP; Section 11W1
Winter 2011
$60 Regular registration
Saturday, February 12, 10 am-3 pm (one hour break for lunch)
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 4

ONE DAY WORKSHOP: UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY HEALTH ON THE SOUTH SIDE: A DISCUSSION WITH DORIANE MILLER
In this workshop, featuring panel discussions with a range of experts, Dr. Miller, Director of the Center for Community Health and Vitality (CCHV) at the University of Chicago, will show how the CCHV promotes positive relationships between the University and South Side communities and improves health services and support to residents. Where and how people are born, grow, live, work and age are factors determining individual and community health, and research shows that South Side neighborhoods face such health problems as diabetes, asthma, hypertension and other chronic health conditions at higher rates than other communities in Chicago.

DORIANE MILLER
Dr. Miller is Director of the Center for Community Health and Vitality, a program of the Urban Health Initiative at the University of Chicago.

Course Code LAHPPP; Section 11W2
Winter 2011
$60 Regular registration
Saturday, February 26, 10 am-3 pm (one hour break for lunch)
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 4

POVERTY AND EDUCATION IN CHICAGO
This course looks at the intersection of poverty and education. We will begin with a consideration of the history of school reform in Chicago, exploring the relationship between poverty, education and student outcomes. We will then focus on Chicago school reform policies and initiatives, highlighting work from the Urban Education Institute, including research on Chicago Public Schools, models of increasing the quality of urban teachers and innovative approaches to schooling. The strengths and shortcomings of current school reform policies will be considered with a stress on understanding the process of policy-making and the complexity of change implied in reform policy.

SARA STOELINGA
Ms. Stoelinga is director of planning and program development at the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago. This course will be held at Chapin Hall, 1313 E. 60th St.

Course Code: LAHPPP; Section 10A4
Spring 2011
$335 Regular registration
Thursdays, March 31-May 19, 4-6:30 pm
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 20

POVERTY AND PROMISE IN CHICAGO
This urban sociology and public policy course will examine urban poverty in Chicago in the context of the city’s rich social history and recent economic transformation. We will consider both promising efforts—on the model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, a widely admired anti-poverty initiative in New York City—to address concentrated poverty and the barriers to such initiatives, with particular attention to social isolation, gangs, and public schools.

CHAD BROUGHTON
Mr. Broughton is senior lecturer in Public Policy Studies and faculty director of Chicago Studies at the University of Chicago. His research seeks to identify areas in Chicago that could become “Promise Neighborhoods” on the model of the Harlem Children’s Zone.

Course Code LAHPPP; Section 10A5
Summer 2011
$185 Regular registration
Wednesdays, July 6-27, 6:00-8:00 pm
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 8

To RSVP for the Public Discussions or register for the courses, please contact Bart Schultz, the Director of the Civic Knowledge Project, at rschultz@uchicago.edu or 773-702-8821.

Additional short workshops will be offered over the course of the academic year, in response to community input. A summer Institute is also being planned for the weekend of August 5-6. This will bring together the researchers and engaged participants from the public discussions and courses for a collective, intensive long weekend set of workshops designed to review and assess the material covered and package it in the form of practical toolkits and community internship opportunities to facilitate active, hands on citizen participation in the effort to build community and overcome poverty.

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