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Poverty, Promise, and Possibility 2012-13

POVERTY, PROMISE, AND POSSIBILITY—A UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CONVENING ON POVERTY AND HOW TO COMBAT IT

A collaboration between the University of Chicago Office of Civic Engagement, Graham School of General Studies, Urban Education Institute, School of Social Service Administration, Neighborhood Schools Program, Civic Knowledge Project, and many participating community organizations.

This initiative from the University of Chicago represents a bold and timely effort to bring together the University’s scholarly resources on issues of poverty in new, more publicly accessible, and more socially relevant ways. The aim is to highlight the useable knowledge available through the University for the purpose of illuminating both the pressing problems of poverty in our area and the practical steps that local communities can take to address such problems. The University’s demonstrated commitment to working with community partners on urgent social issues such as poverty has set the stage for this new initiative, which is designed to foster the larger cooperative ethic of civic friendship that the University seeks to realize in its relationships with a rich array of Chicago neighborhoods and communities. For updates on our events and activities, including our schedule of free public discussions, please visit: http://povertyinitiative.uchicago.edu/
THE AKARAMA GREAT CONVERSATIONS SERIES: SOCIAL JUSTICE. LOCAL POVERTY, AND GLOBAL POVERTY

The South Side version of our popular Great Conversations series has a new theme! Starting in 2012-13, we will be rolling together the Poverty, Promise, and Possibility initiative and the South Side Great Conversations to feature some outstanding African-American public intellectuals expressly concerned with urgent issues of social justice and global poverty. Come get to know these remarkable individuals in an intimate conversational setting at the AKArama Foundation. On select Wednesday evenings, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm, the AKArama Foundation, the Graham School and Civic Knowledge Project will demonstrate how the Woodlawn neighborhood is one vibrant intellectual community. We hope that you will join us for the conversation!

AKArama Foundation, 6220-28 South Ingleside, Chicago Course cost: $10 per lecture; $25 for the three lecture series.

On Wednesday, September 19
DORIANE MILLER ON DISPARITIES IN HEALTH CARE IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY

Doriane C. Miller holds an MD from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, and is Associate Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine and the Director of the Center for Community Health and Vitality at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Under her remarkable leadership, physicians, educators and community members work to improve population health outcomes for residents on the South Side of Chicago through community-engaged research, demonstration and service models.

On Wednesday, October 3rd
LORI BAPTISTA ON SOCIAL JUSTICE AND FOOD JUSTICE

Lori D. Barcliff Baptista holds a Ph.D. from Northwestern University (Performance Studies) and is the Director of the African American Cultural Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Some of her recent research has concerned urban agriculture movements in Chicago’s Roseland community, and she has also been working (with Candice Eloby) on a video documentary about civil rights great Bayard Rustin.

On Wednesday, November 7
THE CIVIC KNOWLEDGE PROJECT ON LOCAL JUSTICE, GLOBAL JUSTICE, AND THE RIGHT TO THE CITY

Please join the leadership of the Civic Knowledge Project for a most provocative evening devoted to discussion of the linkages between local and global social justice issues. The CKP discussion will feature a number of our community partners who are actively involved in the ongoing struggle for social justice!
CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES:

To facilitate community participation throughout the program, discounted registration for the Poverty, Promise, and Possibility courses is available. Individuals or organizations needing to register or requesting special tuition assistance should contact Bart Schultz, at 773-702-8821 or rschultz@uchicago.edu, to inquire about Civic Knowledge Project scholarship opportunities.
POVERTY AND PROMISE IN CHICAGO

This urban sociology and public policy course will examine urban poverty in Chicago in the context of the city’s rich social history and recent economic transformation. We will consider both promising efforts—on the model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, a widely admired anti-poverty initiative in New York City—to address concentrated poverty and the barriers to such initiatives, with particular attention to social isolation, gangs, and public schools.
CHAD BROUGHTON

Mr. Broughton is senior lecturer in Public Policy Studies and faculty director of Chicago Studies at the University of Chicago. His research seeks to identify areas in Chicago that could become “Promise Neighborhoods” on the model of the Harlem Children’s Zone.
Autumn 2012
Hyde Park

$165 Early registration; $185 Regular registration
Saturdays
September 8-October 6
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 8
POVERTY AND EDUCATION IN CHICAGO

This course looks at the intersection of poverty and education. We will begin with a consideration of the history of school reform in Chicago, exploring the relationship between poverty, education and student outcomes. We will then focus on Chicago school reform policies and initiatives, highlighting work from the Urban Education Institute, including research on Chicago Public Schools, models of increasing the quality of urban teachers and innovative approaches to schooling. The strengths and shortcomings of current school reform policies will be considered with a stress on understanding the process of policy-making and the complexity of change implied in reform policy.
SARA STOELINGA

Ms. Stoelinga is senior research analyst at the Consortium on Chicago School Research at the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago.
Winter 2013
Hyde Park

$285 Early registration; $310 Regular registration
Thursdays
January 10-March 7
4-6:00 pm
Teacher Recertification CPDUs: 18

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE UPCOMING PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS, CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES, AND WORKSHOPS, PLEASE VISIT THE POVERTY, PROMISE, AND POSSIBILITY WEBSITE: http://povertyinitiative.uchicago.edu/

AND FOR VIDEOS OF PREVIOUS EVENTS, PLEASE VISIT OUR MEDIA PAGE: http://civicknowledge.uchicago.edu/media.shtml

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Wisdom from Jane Addams

From Jane Addams, “A Modern Lear”:

It is so easy for the good and powerful to think that they can rise by following the dictates of conscience by pursuing their own ideals, leaving those ideals unconnected with the consent of their fellow-men. The president of the Pullman company thought out within his own mind a beautiful town. He had power with which to build this town, but he did not appeal to nor obtain the consent of the men who were living in it. The most unambitious reform, recognizing the necessity for this consent, makes for slow but sane and strenuous progress, while the most ambitious of social plans and experiments, ignoring this, is prone to the failure of the model town of Pullman.

The man who insists upon consent, who moves with the people, is bound to consult the feasible right as well as the absolute right. He is often obliged to attain only Mr. Lincoln’s “best possible,” and often have the sickening sense of compromising with his best convictions. He has to move along with those whom be rules toward a goal that neither he nor they see very clearly till they come to it. He has to discover what people really want, and then “provide the channels in which the growing moral force of their lives shall flow.” What he does attain, however, is not the result of his individual striving, as a solitary mountain climber beyond the sight of the valley multitude, but it is underpinned and upheld by the sentiments and aspirations of many others. Progress has been slower perpendicularly, but incomparably greater because lateral.

He has not taught his contemporaries to climb mountains, but he has persuaded the villagers to move up a few feet higher. It is doubtful if personal ambition, whatever may have been its commercial results, has ever been of any value as a motive power in social reform. But whatever it may have done in the past, it is certainly too archaic to accomplish anything now. Our thoughts, at least for this generation, cannot be too much directed from mutual relationships and responsibilities. They will be warped, unless we look all men in the face, as if a community of interests lay between, unless we bold the mind open, to take strength and cheer from a hundred connections.

To touch to vibrating response the noble fibre in each man, to pull these many fibres, fragile, impalpable and constantly breaking, as they are, into one impulse, to develop that mere impulse through its feeble and tentative stages into action, is no easy task, but lateral progress is impossible without it.

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The Woodlawn Children’s Promise Community

This is the PowerPoint presentation by Samuel Dyson, Assoc. Dir. of the WCPC.WCPC – SSA Poverty Promise Possibility 3-3-11

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Poverty and the Humanities–Course site!

The next phase of Poverty, Promise, and Possibility, the course on Poverty and the Humanities, successfully launched on Wed. evening Oct. 27th! We have a great group and plan to get a lot done, drawing on the humanities to help us redefine and refine the definition of poverty and think through some humanities-based antipoverty programs! Course materials will be available on this site.

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Earl Shorris has a Great Idea!

The second public discussion in the Poverty, Promise, and Possibility series was another huge success, with National Humanities Medalist and Clemente Course in the Humanities founder Earl Shorris delivering a new plan to adapt the highly successful Clemente Course model for use in disadvantaged urban high schools. For more info on this exciting new project to deploy the humanities in active and practical antipoverty efforts, see the attached materials.

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Poverty in Chicago: A Sociological Perspective

The University of Chicago Maroon did a nice story on Chad Broughton’s kick-off public discussion for Poverty, Promise, and Possibility! See http://www.chicagomaroon.com/2010/10/5/prof-calls-for-cps-reforms

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Poverty in Chicago

Sociologist Chad Broughton spoke to a full house on Sept. 30th, in the inaugural public discussion in the Poverty, Promise, and Possibility series.  The slides from his talk, Sociology in Chicago: A Sociological Perspective, are now available here.093010PovertyChicagoLecture

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Welcome to the Poverty, Promise, and Possibility Blog!

The main purpose of this Blog is to facilitate networking among the participants in the University of Chicago’s exciting new initiative Poverty, Promise, and Possibility! We hope that you will give us some feedback on the events in this series, and that you will work with us to put together the best possible educational toolkit based on this initiative, the better to ensure that the knowledge we gain will continue to be accessible and useful. Here is an important recent story featuring one of our Poverty, Promise, and Possibility faculty: http://www.suntimes.com/business/2719222,CST-NWS-Poverty17.article

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Hello world!

Welcome to lucian.uchicago.edu. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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