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Library Digitizes Jazz Age Magazine The Chicagoan

[random-alpha-10].15954.20130605The University of Chicago Library launched a website last month allowing visitors free access to The Chicagoan, an arts and culture magazine fashioned after The New Yorker. Neil Harris, Preston & Sterling Morton Professor Emeritus of History and Art History, discovered the nearly complete run of the magazine in the Regenstein Library in the late 1980s. He later edited a book, The Chicagoan: A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age, exploring the magazine’s ambitions and situating it in the historical context of 1920s Chicago.

The magazine was digitized using the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library’s Digitization Laboratory’s new Zeutschel overhead scanner, which allowed the library to scan bound volumes in house, in a face-up position. “As an online, searchable resource, the Chicagoan facilitates new avenues of study and the ability to zoom in and out on images, while preserving the original print volumes from excessive handling,” said Alice Schreyer, Assistant University Librarian for Humanities, Social Sciences & Special Collections and Curator of Rare Books.

Digital copies of The Chicagoan, which lasted from 1926 to 1935, can be found here.

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New Distinguished Service Professorships Reward Outstanding Scholarship

Two faculty members from the Division of the Humanities were named Distinguished Service Professors. Lauren Berlant has been named George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor in English Language and Literature and the College. Berlant’s research focuses on institutions of intimacy and belonging in the United States since the 19th century, as well as on the public circulation of political emotions like trauma, love, optimism and depression. She joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1984.

D.N. Rodowick has joined the UChicago faculty as the Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor in Cinema and Media Studies and the College. His research interests include aesthetics and the philosophy of art, the history of film theory, philosophical approaches to contemporary art and culture, and the impact of new technologies on contemporary society. Before coming to UChicago, Rodowick was the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University. Prior to that, he founded the Film Studies program at Yale University. Rodowick joined the UChicago faculty on July 1.

Read about all of the new professorships here.

 

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Visual Arts Alumna to Publish Work on Cloistered Nuns

While researching Dedicated to God: An Oral History of Cloistered NunsAbbie Reese, MFA’13, spent six years learning and recording the individual stories of a community of cloistered monastic nuns living in a 25,000 square foot enclosure outside Rockford, IL. Those stories and Reese’s accompanying photographs will be published in November as part of the Oxford University Press’s Oxford Oral History series, and mark one of the first times an author has been allowed access to an enclosure where nuns observe monastic silence.

Reese graduated from the Department of Visual Arts in 2013, and has included photos and video from the project on her website. Her photos were also shown in the 2013 MFA Thesis exhibition, which can be found here.

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Robert Morrissey Named to French Legion of Honor

Robert Morrissey, Benjamin Franklin Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, was recently named a Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur of the French Republic. In order to receive the distinction of Chevalier, one must have a minimum 20 years of public service or 25 years of professional activity, in addition to achieving distinction in one’s field. Morrissey serves as Executive Director of the France Chicago Center and is the Director of the Project for American and French Research on the Treasury of the French Language (ARTFL).

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Janice Knight Featured on Newcity Lit “Lit 50″ List

Janice Knight, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, received the #11 spot on Newcity Lit‘s 2013 “Lit 50″ list for her accomplishments as Chair of the Committee on Creative Writing as well as her work on Early American colonialism, religion, and gender. The annual list recognizes leaders in the Chicago literary scene, with a special focus this year on “celebrating not so much the writers who occupy the center stage, but those who operate behind the scenes to make sure the stage itself exists.” Garrett Kiely, Director of the University of Chicago Press, and Jack Cella, General Manager of the Seminary Co-Operative Bookstore also received top spots on the list (#3 and #4, respectively), further proof of the University’s continuing impact on the Chicago literary scene.

Last year’s list recognized Hillary Chute, Rachel DeWoskin, and Jeffrey Brown from English and Creative Writing.

Read the full 2013 list here.

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Humanities Division Teaching Award Winners Recognized at Spring Convocation

Two faculty and one graduate student in the Division of the Humanities were honored for their excellence and commitment to teaching at all levels. Aden Kumler, Assistant Professor in Art History, received the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and Christopher Wild, Associate Professor in Germanic Studies, received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring. Felipe Rojas, PhD student in Romance Languages and Literatures, received the Wayne C. Booth Graduate Student Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

Teaching award recipients were honored in connection with the spring Convocation on June 15.

Read about the awards and the complete list of winners here.

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Philip V. Bohlman Receives Guggenheim Fellowship

Philip V. Bohlman, the Mary Werkman Distinguished Service Professor of Music, received the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Bohlman plans to use the fellowship to work on a new book, Music After Nationalism. In his work as an ethnomusicologist, he studies Jewish music and modernity as well as politics of religion and race in the music of the Middle East and South Asia. He is also the artistic director for the New Budapest Orpheum Society, who were the recipients of the 2011 Noah Greenberg Award for Historical Performance from the American Musicological Society.

To read a full biography and learn more about the fellowship, click here.

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New Book Examines Legal Issues in Shakespeare

9780226924939The University of Chicago Press recently published Shakespeare and the Law: A Conversation among Disciplines and Professions, edited by Bradin Cormack, Professor in English Language and Literature, Richard Strier, the Frank L. Sulzberger Distinguished Service Professor in English Language and Literature, and Martha C. Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics. The book’s four sections examine the relationship between law and literature, Shakespeare’s awareness of the law, his attitude toward law, and how law enters into politics and community both in the plays and in our world. It closes with a transcript of a 2009 conference that inspired the collection, wherein Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, Judge Richard Posner, Nussbaum, and Strier discuss the legal themes in HamletMeasure for Measure, and As You Like It.

To read excerpts from the conference and learn more about Shakespeare and the Law, visit The University of Chicago Magazine.

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Bart Schultz Wins Outstanding Educator Award

Bart Schultz, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Director of the Civic Knowledge Project, was honored with an “Outstanding Educator” award by the Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Rainbow PUSH, which seeks to enact social change by promoting economic and educational equality, recognized Schultz for his work to strengthen community connections among various knowledge communities on the South Side of Chicago through the Civic Knowledge Project.

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Rebecca Zorach Curates Exhibit for AFRICOBRA in Chicago

Rebecca Zorach, Professor in Art History, is curating an exhibition at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts as part of AFRICOBRA in Chicago, “a linked series of exhibitions and public programs scheduled May–September 2013 focusing on the Chicago artist group AFRICOBRA (African Commune Of Bad Relevant Artists), founded in 1968 and still active.”

AFRICOBRA: Philosophy, curated by Zorach, will run from June 28 to August 11, 2013 at the Logan Center. According to the press release, the exhibit:

…is designed to highlight the aesthetic philosophy of AFRICOBRA first articulated in statements and exhibition text in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The exhibition in the Logan Center Gallery will demonstrate how the AFRICOBRA philosophy was collaboratively developed by the five founding members, through a presentation of key early works and selected current works, raising the question of how founding principles continue to inform each artist…Themes to be addressed include the revolutionary politics of the period, the project of bringing art to the people through a range of media, and the relationship of gender roles and family to the political context of the time.

Zorach is also assisting with the opening exhibition AFRICOBRA: Prologue at the South Side Community Art Center, which runs from May 10 to July 7, 2013 and is curated by University of Chicago students. The opening exhibition will provide historical background and contemporary context for the other exhibitions in the series.

AFRICOBRA in Chicago is a collaboration between The South Side Community Art Center, the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, and The DuSable Museum of African American History. A jointly-published website with detailed information about each of the events will launch later this month.

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Alumni Recognized for Service and Professional Achievement During Alumni Weekend

Two alumni with ties to the Division of the Humanities will be recognized at the 72nd Annual Alumni Awards Ceremony on Saturday, June 8th.

Nancy Parra, AM’66, PhD’73, is a member of the Alumni Club of Houston, the Alumni Board of Governors, and the Visiting Committee to the Division of the Humanities. The years of her involvement with the Alumni Club of Houston have seen an increase in alumni participation. During her time with the Alumni Board of Governors she helped produce the Student Externship Program, which both positively impacts the lives of students and promotes alumni service. Parra will be presented with the Alumni Service Award in honor of her her continued advocacy for the University.

Eva Fishell Lichtenberg, LAB’49, AB’52, AM’55, PhD’60, will be presented with the Alumni Service Medal “for her thoughtful approach in identifying the needs of current students to ensure their overall experience – from curriculum, student life, and extracurricular activities – showed growth and revitalization.” She has served on the Alumni Board of Governors, the Visiting Committee to the Department of Music, the Visiting Committee to the College, and currently serves on the University of Chicago Women’s Board and the Visiting Committee to the Division of the Humanities. She also serves on a number of charitable boards throughout Chicago.

Learn about the Alumni Awards Ceremony and read the full alumni biographies here.

Alumni Weekend will take place from June 6 to June 9. To find out more about the weekend’s programming and to register, please visit the Alumni Weekend site.

 

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Alumna and Philosophy Professor Featured in Food-centric Chicago Reader Issue

For the “Where Chicago Eats” issue of the Chicago ReaderAnton Ford, Assistant Professor in Philosophy, and Miranda Swanson, AM’01, contributed their thoughts on food.

Anton Ford and Hannah Gold, a fourth-year in the College, debated whether something as crowd-pleasing as a doughnut can be an absolute good in an article penned by Gold. The relationship of donuts to philosophy arose in Ford’s “Justice” lecture class, in which he asked, “If one finds a box of doughnuts in a hallway, is she forced to eat them, doughnuts being unmistakably delicious?” ultimately concluding, “Doughnuts are not an absolute good. You choose whether or not to eat another’s doughnuts; the act, therefore, cannot be justified.”

Miranda Swanson, AM’01, writes about her favorite Chicago chef, who is also her husband. The enjoyment they take from meals has also become a family affair—Swanson’s two and a half year old twins are now old enough to appreciate lobster on linguine as well.

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Jessica Burstein, AM’90, PhD’98, Publishes Work on Fashion and Modernism

Jessica Burstein, AM’90, PhD’98, published Cold Modernism: Literature, Fashion, Art as part of the Refiguring Modernism series. The book proposes a new understanding of modernism: cold modernism, which “operates on the premise that ‘there is a world in which the mind does not exist, let alone matter.'” Burstein wrote about the experience of publishing her book in the latest issue of The University of Chicago Magazine.

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Jeff McMahon, AM’02, on the Writing of Roger Ebert, X’70

In an article for Forbes.com, Jeff McMahon, AM’02, examines the beloved, accessible, and often rule-breaking writing style of Roger Ebert, X’70. McMahon notes that many tributes to Ebert since his death have somewhat clumsily focused on his love of movies, and neglected the nuance and humility he brought to his reviews. Along with his obvious passion for the films he reviewed, McMahon’s article illustrates that Ebert should be remembered both for his honesty and his respect for the audience. “Why was Roger Ebert the greatest movie reviewer?” McMahon asks. “Not because he cared about movies, not because he told us what to think about movies, but because he told us just enough to care and to think for ourselves.”

McMahon is an alumnus of the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH) and currently serves as the program’s writing advisor. He also teaches journalism courses for the Committee on Creative Writing.

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Faculty Members Lecture on Identity and Language in Videos from 2012 Chicago Humanities Festival

Michael Silverstein, the Charles F. Grey Distinguished Service Professor in Anthropology, Linguistics, and Psychology, and Raúl Coronado, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, lectured as part of the 2012 Chicago Humanities Festival. Coronado spoke on Latino Identity and Literature, drawing on his studies of Latina/o literary and cultural history from the colonial period to the 1940s. Silverstein gave a lecture titled “America’s Tongues” that highlighted his work in the structure and history of language.

Information about the 2013 Chicago Humanities Festival can be found here.

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Patrick Jagoda on Digital Storytelling and Video Games as Texts

GCWINTER13-Patrick-Jagoda-1-Tiffany-Tan-1024x682Patrick Jagoda, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, was profiled in the Winter 2013 issue of Grey City. Jagoda, who has been teaching at UChicago since 2010, is affiliated with one of the eighteen inaugural faculty research projects sponsored by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society. In the interview, Jagoda explains how the project “uses digital storytelling and game design to work through various health issues with youth, especially high-school aged youth…co-creating digital stories that have to do with everything from sexually transmitted infections to sexual violence to gender issues.”

Jagoda also describes the importance of viewing video games as types of texts, stating that video games held as much importance as novels did during the late 20th and early 21st century. He also points out how receptive UChicago faculty members have been to his research, saying, “People want to share in the work and experience games that they might not otherwise be playing, or think about how categories central to a discipline such as English, like narrative or aesthetics, might help us think about this new form.”

Read the entire interview here.

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Jennifer Chiaverini, AM’92, Publishes Historical Novel

Jennifer Chiaverini, AM’92, published Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker, a Civil War-era historical novel that details the life of Elizabeth Keckley, a former slave who became Mary Todd Lincoln’s personal seamstress. In a New York Times article on Keckley, Chiaverini says that the inspiration to write about Keckley’s life came from research for earlier Civil War-era books, which often relied on Keckley. According to the article, after reading Keckley’s controversial memoir, Chiaverini had the idea to write a novel based on “day-to-day moments between the seamstress and the first lady.”

Chiaverini is also the author of the New York Times bestselling Elm Creek Quilts series.

More alumni-penned books can be found on the University of Chicago Magazine Goodreads page.

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Tom Gunning Illuminates Small Details on the Big Screen

Monday night screenings, shot-for-shot dissections, and lively discussion are all par for the course during film classes with Tom Gunning, the Edwin A. and Betty L. Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of Art History and Cinema and Media Studies. The University of Chicago Magazine profiled Gunning, highlighting his “History of International Cinema, Part II: Sound Era to 1960″ course. Throughout the class, he offers nuanced readings of films such as M, a 1931 police procedural by Fritz Lang, and It Happened One Night, a genre-defining romantic comedy starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert. The small cinematic details Gunning fixates on are writ large by viewing the films on the big screen.

Pick up What Is Cinema?, the text Gunning uses when teaching “History of International Cinema, Part II”.

Read a Tableau interview with Tom Gunning here.

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Justine Nagan, AM’04, Honored by New Leaders Council

Justine Nagan, AM’04, a graduate of the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH), was presented with one of the 2013 40 Under 40 Media Leadership Awards from the New Leaders Council. Nagan is the Executive Director of Kartemquin Films, which produces documentaries focused on social justice such as Hoop Dreams and The Interrupters. In 2009, she directed Typeface, a documentary that explored The Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum in Two Rivers, WI, and examined artists’ responsibility to preserving a dying craft alongside how rural towns can “survive in a shifting industrial marketplace where big-box retailers are king.”

The 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards honor individuals in four categories: political leadership, media leadership, advocacy, and entrepreneurship. Recipients are selected by members of the New Leaders Council for exemplifying the organization’s “ideal of political entrepreneurship.”

Learn more about the council here and see upcoming films from Kartemquin here.

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Chicago Literature List Features English and Creative Writing Faculty Members

Hillary Chute, Neubauer Family Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, as well as Rachel DeWoskin and Jeffrey Brown, both faculty members in Creative Writing, were featured on the Newcity Lit 2012 “Lit 50″ list, which celebrates “on-the-page creators” active in the Chicago literary scene. Chute was called an “alt-comics impresario” who “may be the one to take Chicago from being a comic-book city to a full-blown metropolis of graphic storytelling,” while Brown was hailed as an “ascendant talent” for his comic memoirs such as Darth Vader and Son. DeWoskin’s memoir Foreign Babes in Beijing is currently in development at HBO, while her most recent novel Big Girl Small won an Alex Award, which honors books with special appeal to young adults.

Read the full list here.

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