How to Navigate the Secrets and Mysteries of the UChicago Libraries

October 16th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

A guest post by Bill Hutchison (MAPH ’12), an enthusiastic library patron, one of last year’s mentors, and a current PhD candidate in English at UChicago.  Bill will also talking with Matti Bunzl at today’s The Work of a Humanist: A Conversation with Matti Bunzl (PhD ’98).

stacks

Go towards the light!!

 

“Libraries raised me.”
—Isaac Asimov

The UChicago library system is—as it should be—a labyrinthine construct with countless treasures, secrets, and codes. Discovering what it holds and how to access it can be one of the great pleasures of graduate school. If you, like me, take tremendous joy from learning how to wield your library to your own wild, intellectual ends, take note: herein I will share with you some of my discoveries. » Read the rest of this entry «

Herein lies a LONG but VERY USEFUL post on the mysterious, elusive thing “PROFESSIONALIZATION”

October 10th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Searching the word “professionalize” in Google images leads to some pretty abstract, random stuff: mountains, schoolchildren, businessy-looking people in suits, even cats. Professionalization can often feel like a vague, abstract task–one that you’re unsure how to go about doing, but one that seems expected of you.

As in, MAPH expects it of you. A large part of MAPH’s work in developing better thinkers, writers, and humanists is helping students conquer the professional world–or at least, helping students look astutely at application materials, get a handle on job markets, and think about how the humanities work both within and outside of the academy.

Luckily, your journey into professionalism in MAPH doesn’t have to be confusing and daunting. In MAPH land, professionalization means developing your skills, experience, and connections, and being able to write and talk about those things in compelling and interesting ways.

Professionalization doesn’t have to be this creepy, I promise.

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE:

1. You are thinking of working after MAPH.

It takes an average of 3-6 months to get a job, sometimes longer depending on the industry. If you do the math, that means ideally you’ll start applying for jobs in Winter Quarter (you know, 2 months from now). Unfortunately, Winter Quarter is the busiest time of the MAPH year–3 classes, a thesis, IT’S SO COLD OUTSIDE. Getting your resume in shape now cannot possibly be a bad idea.  » Read the rest of this entry «

First Weeks – Difficult, But, No, It’s Not the Apocalypse

September 26th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

You want me to do what?!

You want me to do what?!

Maybe it’s just because I’m reading Delaney’s Dhalgren, but all I can think about is the idea of a never-ending (post?-)apocalyptic time in which everything is confusing, chaotic, and hazy. Which sounds a bit like how MAPH felt during my first few weeks here.

As you’ve completed (and perhaps struggled through) your first analytic exposition writing assignment  and you feel overwhelmed with meeting 100+ people, you too might feel that you are in the midst of Dhalgren’s Bellona, lost and alone, but take heart! For starters, unlike the protagonist of Delaney’s novel, you (most likely) remember your own name and where you come from. You’re also probably receiving some regular nourishment, provided you are attending even a few MAPH events. And it helps that (hopefully) nothing is on fire.

Bellona, city from Dhalgren

Bellona, city from Dhalgren. Not MAPH.

 

If you are feeling as though you’ve entered a completely new world in which the rules are illegible, take a deep breath (or three) and read on for some helpful advice. It’s all going to be okay. » Read the rest of this entry «

Service Match Community Partner Profiles

September 16th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Get access to all of Chicago!

Get access to all of Chicago!

If you are interested in getting involved with the Hyde Park community while gaining skills and experiences that will doubtless be useful to you after MAPH, please be sure to read Keri’s blog post about Service Match from last week.  We now have the full list of Community Partners & volunteer opportunities for this year’s program, so please read on for brief descriptions of the opportunities available.  There are some pretty amazing ones. You can also find the application online here.

Also, a reminder:  Crystal Coats will be in Classics 110 to talk/answer questions about Service Match this Wednesday, September 18 at 10:30 am.  We strongly recommend that you attend if you are thinking about applying for any of these opportunities.

Coppin Community Center/ Coppin AME Church

5627-33 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637

Description of Volunteer Opportunities Available: Grant Writing, Policy Research, Youth Education, Community Development, Community-based Events, Computer Literacy, Literacy Programs » Read the rest of this entry «

A Beginner’s Guide to UChicago’s Campus & Its Environs

September 9th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

people-looking-mapHullo, MAPH ’14.  Welcome to Chicago!  We presume that most of you are here or about to be here by now, so we’ve created two Google maps that we hope you will find handy as you settle in.  On one of these you will find information about on-campus points of interest like cafes, ATMs, and, significantly, Colloquium/Core event locations. The other highlights » Read the rest of this entry «

Escape from H.P. (A How To)

August 1st, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

So, a couple of weeks ago we suggested that you visit other Chicago neighborhoods before Colloquium starts on September 15.  If you’ve since arrived, you may now be wondering what the best way to physically get to those neighborhoods may be. We assume that most of you are all familiar with (and perhaps reliant on) Google Maps, which is obviously a great resource.  However, when heading to and from Hyde Park on the CTA, Google Maps does not always lead you down the most convenient path.   Nor does the site contain all the information that drivers need, especially in terms of parking. Hopefully this post will help fill in some of those gaps.

If you’re getting there using public transit

travel_info_header » Read the rest of this entry «

10 Things You Really Rather Ought to Do Before Classes Start

July 24th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

So you’ve rolled into Chicago (or you’re about to in the near future). You’re probably wondering, what do I do with all my time? Classes don’t start until mid-September, summer is at its finest (this 70 degree weather is MAGICAL), and you’re starting to explore the city—what’s next? Here’s a list of things that I wish I had done before starting my MAPH year.

 

10 Things You Really Rather Ought to Do Before Classes Start:

1. Get a CTA card. Unless you’ve devised a teleportation device, you will use transit. Often. Even if you have a bike. Even if you have a car. Parking downtown is a nightmare, and sometimes it just makes more sense to take the train (like if you say want to go to the bar and have more than one drink per hour). Got your card? Now hop on the 6 and head downtown! And don’t forget: the Metra Electric isn’t covered by your card, although it is very fast and sitting on the second floor of a train is always a delight.

2. Get a public library card. There are lots and lots of locations, and if you’re already exploring downtown Chicago, Harold Washington is right there on State Street. There may come a time when you haven’t purchased or borrowed a book for class in time, and the UChicago library will have no copies available, and you will need an alternate source. » Read the rest of this entry «

7 Reasons to Apply for Externships

April 24th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

externships obviously

Your brain on externships.

Next Tuesday, April 30th, we will be holding an Information Session for Externships at 12pm in Classics 110. It will only be 30 minutes and packed with valuable information, so you should definitely attend if at all possible!

In the hopes of getting you interested, here are 7 great reasons I just came up with to apply for externships this summer:

» Read the rest of this entry «

Campus Days ’13: What to Do if You Get Here Early

March 25th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

In town for Campus Days with time to fill? Don’t trust Yelp (We totally get it.) to guide you to a good meal and tasty beverages? Never fear. We in the MAPH office spend a lot of time in Hyde Park and we have plenty of suggestions (read: ironclad opinions) for where to go and what to do, whether you are on campus or roaming around the neighborhood. This is not an exhaustive list, but it’s a good one.

 On Campus

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First things first, just wander around. The campus is rarely prettier than it is in the spring; if the weather is good, a leisurely stroll through the arches and  across the quads really can’t be beat. If walking around aimlessly is not your thing, or if you have exhausted your aimless walking possibilities and you want a specific destination, we are partial to the Oriental Institute. The collection is fantastic (and really, really old), the building is beautiful, and admission is free (although the museum suggests a donation).

Also worth checking out is the Mansueto Library,a giant glass and steel ellipsoid on 57th Street that contains fancy robots that brings you books by request from deep inside the earth. It’s really cool.

Off Campus

Go to the lake. More specifically, go to Promontory Point. (It’s a short walk from campus and well worth it.) Or go to the DuSable Museum. Or browse in one of the excellent bookstores that Hyde Park is home to: Powell’s, tons of used books at great prices (1501 E 57th St, Chicago, IL); 57th St Books, a great general interest bookstore in which to wile away the hours (1301 E 57th St  Chicago, IL 60637); The Seminary Co-op, one of the best books stores in the whole wide world (5751 South Woodlawn Avenue).

Food/Coffee/Strong Drink

coffeeZ&H (1323 E. 57th St) has tasty, tasty sandwiches and good coffee. Bonjour Bakery (1550 East Hyde Park Blvd) makes a mean croque monsieur and really good croissants. Rajun Cajun (1459 E. 53rd St) Despite its misleading name, this place has tasty Indian food. Oh, the samosas! Valois (1518 E. 53rd St) is a classic cafeteria and a Hyde Park institution.

Robust (63rd and Woodlawn), The Sip (5301 S Hyde Park Blvd), the aforementioned Z&H, and Café 57 (1520 E. 57th St) all serve pretty good coffee (Z&H is the best, in our opinion.)

There are a couple of good bars in Hyde Park (they are dive-y in a pleasant way). The Cove (1750 E 55th St) has a fun jukebox and darts and foosball. Jimmy’s (Woodlawn Tap) (1172 E 55th St) is just a few blocks from campus and has cheap burgers and fries. It’s a classic college-town bar.

If you want still more suggestions, just email us. We will be happy to point you in the best direction.

Ways to Stay Sane (and Warm!) During Winter Quarter

January 24th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

LakeShore

Yes, this is a thing that happened on Lake Shore Drive in 2011. But, much to our amusement, this photo accompanies an article entitled “Abandoned on LSD.”
WHICH SOUNDS TERRIFYING.

Alright, so you’ve heard us all griping about how difficult and harrowing Winter Quarter is. And as we’re sure you know, now that you’re in the midst of it, it sure is. But before you start to feel like this, we wanted to intervene to let you know that there are plenty of things to do to manage Winter Quarter stress. And some ways in which, maybe, you might even learn to enjoy the UChicago quarter that is almost mythically scary. 

1) Pace yourself. Plan ahead. Resign yourself to the fact that you won’t be able to read everything for every one of your classes. Prioritize your workload so that things feel manageable. Try to settle on final paper topics by Week 5 so that you are not struggling to pick up the pieces at the last minute. You will really thank yourself by the time the quarter is winding down. Try to find interesting ways to put your classes into conversation with one another (or with your thesis). It will make your work feel more meaningful, creative and comprehensive – and it also might help you narrow down your reading lists when it comes to approaching final papers and projects. » Read the rest of this entry «