What Are the Humanities For?

September 17th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Hello MAPHers!

I am Kerri Hunt and I am here to help you answer the often-daunting question of “What are the Humanities (or an MA in the Humanities) for?” In addition to working as a Preceptor, I am also the Career and Alumni Outreach Coordinator. In other words, I am MAPH’s in-house career advisor.

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I am wise like an otter

I think of my role as MAPH career advisor as an extension and expansion of the part I play as a preceptor.  I’m here as an advisor, guide, and sounding board to help you make the most of your time in MAPH (and thereafter), with a particular focus on helping you think through the value of your studies and your degree.

“Value” here could mean economic value – how to leverage the relationships and skills you’ve built here to advance your career – but I’m also interested in discussing with you the other senses of “value” that led you here, to spend a year devoted to humanistic study.

This means that while I am available to review a cover letter, read a draft personal statement, or connect you with alumni in a relevant field, I am also concerned with the more nebulous task of helping you figure out ways to integrate your personal values and intellectual interests into your life after MAPH, whether or not you decide to pursue an academic career.

For those of you considering a PhD, I can provide insight into what it means to become a professional academic and help you use your coursework here to test whether further graduate studies are for you. If you do decide to apply to PhD programs, I can discuss strategies for building relationships with faculty; help you decide where to apply; and read drafts of your personal statement.

For those of you who are considering other careers — or jobs between MAPH and a PhD program — I can read resumes, give advice on job hunting, and put you in touch with alumni in the fields of your interests. Essentially, I am here to connect you to all the career-related resources offered by MAPH and the University of Chicago.

These include:

  • Career counselors at Graduate Student Affairs
  • GSA programming, including the Getting a Start In series, networking tutorials, and practice interviews
  • MAPH’s Teaching in the Community College class and associated programming
  • GradUCon, GSA’s January career fair for graduate students
  • The University-wide alumni network
  • Linkedin groups and resources

Also coming up soon: MAPH Alumni Career Night on November 12th. Have this event on your calendar and in the back of your mind as the quarter begins. It is an excellent opportunity to connect with alumni and learn more about popular career fields.
Just as your preceptor should be your first contact for all your questions about navigating MAPH and the University of Chicago, think of me as your point person for all career- and life path-related questions, concerns, anxieties, humorous anecdotes, etc.  This goes double for those of you who are still undecided about your future path: if you are hoping to use your MAPH year as an opportunity to explore options, change careers, grow as a person, or just figure out your next step, please come meet with me soon!

In the weeks to come, I hope to connect with every one of you – even if it’s just to say hello and introduce ourselves.  (Please bear with me as I learn all of your names.)  During Fall quarter (i.e., starting September 29) I’ll have set office hours every Tuesday and alternate Wednesdays. You can sign up in the MAPH office.  I’m also available by appointment, or to chat whenever you see me in MAPH Central, at Social Hour, or around campus.

I look forward to meeting you all!

 

 

Getting a Start In…Publishing! Tuesday 4/15

April 10th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Note: Be on the lookout for more “Getting a Start in…” events this quarter!

GETTING A START IN PUBLISHING

April 15, 2014 (4:30-5:30)publishing

Classics 110, refreshments served

 Despite doom and gloom rhetoric (see image) about the fate of the publishing industry, small presses, magazines, and literary organizations are thriving—and hiring—in Chicago and farther afield. Where do you start to look for publishing jobs and discern whether you are qualified? How can you build a network? And perhaps most importantly, how do you articulate the value of graduate student work to potential employers? Join us for a conversation with representatives from four great Chicago publishing institutions: » Read the rest of this entry «