Institute for Advanced Study, School of Social Science

Website

Deadline: November 1

Submission Method: Electronic

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Danielle Allen, Classics & former Hum Dean, is now a faculty member; Julie E. Cooper, Political Science (09/10); Lisa Weeden, Political Science (06/07)

Competition Level: 22 fellowships were awarded in 2009/10; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: Former members are not eligible.

Fellows at the Institute’s School of Social Science in Princeton, NJ are in residence for an academic year.  Visiting scholars are drawn from a wide range of fields including political science, economics, law, psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, philosophy, and literary criticism.

In an attempt to create a sense of community among the Members, the School designates a theme for each year. The theme for 2010/11 is “Secularism.” The thematic focus is neither an exclusive nor excluding theme; however, it is expected that only one-third of the accepted scholars will pursue work relating directly to the theme. Applications are strongly encouraged from scholars across the social science spectrum, regardless if their research corresponds to the year’s theme.

Membership stipends vary.

Institute for Advanced Study, School of Historical Studies

Website

Deadline: November 1

Submission Method: Electronic

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Verity Platt, Art History (09/10); Christopher Faraone, Classics (08/09); Persis Berlekamp, Art History (07/08); Maria Fusaro, History (02/03)

Competition Level: 40 fellowships are awarded annually; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: Substantial record of publication; the School takes into account the stage of the scholar’s academic career when considering the list of publications, but in general applicants should have at least several articles already published.

Fellows at the Institute’s School of Historical Studies are in residence for either one term (first term Sept. 21 to Dec. 18, second term Jan. 4 to April 2) or for two terms, amounting to a full academic year.  It supports scholarship in all fields of historical research but is concerned principally with the history of western, near eastern, and far eastern civilizations, with particular emphasis on Greek and Roman civilization, the history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, the history of art, the history of science, and modern international relations.

Stipends of up to $65,000 are awarded for the full academic year, or $32,750 for one term.

School for Advanced Research on the Human Experience

Website

Deadline: November 1 (receipt)

Submission Method: Mail

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Michael Dietler, Anthropology (02/03)

Competition Level: 6 fellowships will be awarded in 2008/09; the number of applications submitted isnot available

Eligibility: Preference is given to applicants whose fieldwork or basic research and analysis are complete and who need time to write manuscripts.

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) awards approximately six Resident Scholar Fellowships each year to scholars who have completed their research and analysis and who need time to think and write about topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from anthropology or from related fields such as history, sociology, art, and philosophy. Both humanistically and scientifically oriented scholars are encouraged to apply.

SAR provides Resident Scholars with low-cost housing and office space on campus, a stipend up to $40,000, library assistance, and other benefits during a nine-month tenure, from September 1 through May 31.

Four types of fellowships are available: Weatherhead Fellowships, two of which are available for either PhD candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or scientific in nature; SAR fellowships, up to two of which are available for either PhD candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or scientific in nature; the Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship, which is available to a Native American scholar, either pre- or post-doctoral, working in either the humanities or the sciences; and the Anne Ray Fellowship, which is available to an established Native American scholar working in the humanities, arts, or the sciences, who has a commitment to providing mentorship to recent Native graduates or graduate students.

Folger Shakespeare Library

OUTDATED; NEEDS UPDATE

Website

Deadline: For long-term: November 1; for short-term: March 1 (postmark)

Submission Method: Electronic

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Bradin Cormack, English (09/10)

Competition Level: 5 fellowships will be awarded in 2008/09; approximately 30 applications are expected.  30 to 35 short-term fellowships will be awarded; approximately 150 applications are expected.

Eligibility: Long-term NEH fellowships are restricted to US citizens or to foreign nationals who have been living in the U.S. for at least 3 years.

The Folger Shakespeare Library on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC offers research fellowships to encourage access to its exceptional collections and to encourage ongoing cross-disciplinary dialogue among scholars of the early modern period.  Each year, scholars may compete for a limited number of long-term (six to nine mos.) and short-term (one to three mos.) fellowships.

Long-term Fellowships
Long-term fellowships are supported by funds from the Mellon Foundation and the NEH.  Fellows are selected by an external committee that considers the following criteria in making its selections: importance of the topic; originality and sophistication of the approach; feasibility of the research objectives; and the applicant’s need for the Folger collections.  The Folger is open to traditional as well as innovative scholarly methodologies and agendas.

Two Mellon Research Fellowships will be awarded and carry stipends of $50,000.  Three NEH Fellowships will be awarded and carry maximum stipends of $40,000.  Mellon Postdoctoral Research Fellowships are open to scholars from any country.

Short-term Fellowships
Short-term fellowships are supported by the Library’s endowments and carry a stipend of $2,000 per month.  The criteria for success in the annual short-term fellowship competition are the same as those for long-term fellowships.

American Academy in Rome: The Rome Prize

Website

Deadline: November 1 (can be extended to Nov. 15 for a fee) (postmark)

Submission Method: Mail

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Richard T. Neer, Art History (03/04); Gabriel Pihas, Pre-doctoral Italian Studies (01/02)

Competition Level: 15 fellowships are awarded annually to scholars, and 15 fellowships are awarded annually to emerging artists; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: Applicants must be U.S. citizens at the time of the application; previous winners are ineligible; foreign nationals who have lived in the US for three years immediately preceding the application deadline may apply for the NEH post-doctoral fellowships.

Rome Prize Fellowships are designed for emerging artists and scholars in the early or middle stages of their career. In the case of scholars, preference will be given to applicants for whom research time in Italy, and especially in the city of Rome, is essential, and who have not had extensive experience there. Fellows are chosen from the following disciplines: Architecture, Design, Historic Preservation and Conservation, Landscape Architecture, Literature (only by nomination through the American Academy of Arts and Letters), Musical Composition, Visual Arts, Ancient Studies, Medieval Studies, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, and Modern Italian Studies.

Fellows are in residence at the American Academy in Rome compound on the Janiculum, Rome’s highest hill, from September to March or September to August. They are provided with a stipend, meals, a bedroom with private bath, and a study or studio. Winners of six-month and eleven-month fellowships receive stipends of $12,500 and $25,000, respectively.

The Getty Foundation

Website

Deadline: November 1 (receipt)

Submission Method: Mail (this may have changed; new guidelines not yet available)

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Tom Gunning, Art History (09/10); Chris Faraone, Classics (08/09); Herbert George, Visual Arts (Museum Guest Scholar, 06/07); Ingrid Rowland, Art History (00/01); Robert Nelson, Art History (99/00); Martha Feldman, Music (98/99); Barbara Stafford, Art History (95/96)

Competition Level: 16 fellowships are awarded in 2009/10; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: These grants are for established scholars, artists, or writers who have attained distinction in their fields. Applications are welcome from researchers of all nationalities who are working in the arts, humanities, or social sciences.

Getty Scholar and Visiting Scholar Grants provide a unique research experience. Recipients are in residence at the Getty Research Institute, where they pursue their own projects free from academic obligations, make use of Getty collections, join their colleagues in a weekly meeting devoted to the year’s research theme, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty.

The 2010/11 theme is “The Display of Art.” Projects may focus on, but are not limited to: the history of museums; display in and of antiquity; private and public modes of display; the display of cultural encounter; display itself as art form; and the links between the display of art and conservation.

Stanford Humanities Center

Website

Deadline: October 15

Submission Method: Electronic

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: None

Competition Level: 6-9 fellowships are awarded annually; approximately 250 applications are received annually (a record number of applications was received for 2009/10)

Eligibility: Applicants must have a PhD and normally will be at least three years beyond receipt of the degree at the start of the fellowship year (i.e., will have received the PhD in or before September 2007 for the 2010/11 fellowship); creative arts projects and former external fellows are not eligible, but one fellowship for an arts practitioner/writer is offered at a separate deadline (see below).

This fellowship is awarded to support research projects in the humanities. The Center seeks candidates whose research is likely to contribute to intellectual exchange among a diverse group of scholars within the disciplines of the humanities. One fellowship is awarded each year to a scholar working in the digital humanities.

Fellowships are awarded across the spectrum of academic ranks (assistant, associate, and full professor). Junior fellowships are for scholars who will be at least three and no more than ten years beyond receipt of the Ph.D. by the start of their prospective fellowship year. Senior fellowships are for established scholars who are more than ten years beyond receipt of the PhD.

Fellows are in residence at Stanford University for the academic year. They are awarded stipends of up to $60,000 and a housing and moving allowance of up to $15,000, dependent upon need. Fellows are required to live within a ten-mile radius of Stanford, to attend lunch regularly (at least 4 days a week), and to participate in the research presentations.

The Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SiCa) and the Humanities Center offer one residential fellowship for a practitioner who is also a writer, scholar, or critic pursuing a research project in the arts. The deadline is December 1, 2009, and the applicant must have received a relevant terminal degree (usually MFA or PhD) in or before September 2007; everything else is the same.

American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Website

Deadline: ~October 15 (postmark)

Submission Method: Mail

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: None ever

Competition Level: 7- 8 fellowships are awarded annually; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: Candidates must be U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or current faculty members of an academic or professional organization in the U.S.; preference is given to untenured junior faculty, but qualified postdocs also may apply

Visiting Scholars at the Academy of Arts & Sciences are expected to be in residence at the American Academy in Cambridge throughout the academic year (mid-September-May). Applicants should be untenured junior faculty or postdoctoral students who can demonstrate that their work will make a substantial contribution in one or more of the Academy’s four scholarly research areas: Humanities and Culture, Social Policy and American Institutions, Science and Global Security, and Education Policy.  Proposals should take into account the Academy’s emphasis on interdisciplinary work, as well as its interest in broadening public understanding of important intellectual trends and contemporary policy choices.

Faculty can receive up to $60,000 (not to exceed one-half of current salary). Postdocs receive an annual stipend of up to $40,000. The Academy provides office space, computer services, library privileges, and assists with information on locating housing. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Academy require that you have health insurance before taking up your residency.

Villa I Tatti

Website

Deadline: October 15 (receipt)

Submission Method: Electronic or Mail

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Robert Nelson, Art History (03/04)

Competition Level: 15 fellowships are awarded annually; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: The Villa I Tatti Fellowship is meant for a scholar who is within ten years of receiving his doctorate; renewals or repeats of an I Tatti Fellowship are not granted.

Villa I Tatti Fellows are expected to be in residence in Florence, Italy from early September till June and to participate actively in the life of the center for the full period of their fellowship. Each Fellow is offered a place to study, use of the Biblioteca and Fototeca Berenson, lunches on weekdays, and various other privileges, but he or she must arrange his or her own living accommodations. Stipends will be awarded according to individual needs, and a projected budget is requested from successful candidates at a later stage. Stipends generally do not exceed the $55,000 – $60,000 range.

Projects do not have to be devoted to Florentine subjects and often are not, but they must include the Italian Renaissance, and it must be possible for the greater part of the project to be accomplished in Florence.

These fellowships are offered by the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies.

National Humanities Center

Website

Deadline: October 15 (postmark)

Submission Method: Mail or electronic (via email)

Current Fellows

Recent Chicago Fellows: Judith Brooke Farquhar, Anthropology (07/08); Elizabeth Helsinger, English & Art History (07/08); Jan E. Goldstein, History (06/07); William H. Sewell, History & Political Science (06/07); Kyeong-Hee Choi, East Asian Studies (05/06); Larry Zbikowski, Music (03/04); William C. Wimsatt, Philosophy (00/01)

Competition Level: 40 fellowships are awarded annually; the number of applications submitted is not available

Eligibility: In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects.  Young and senior scholars may apply, but they must have a record of publication, and recent PhDs should be aware that the Center does not support the revision of a doctoral dissertation.

Fellows of the National Humanities Institute are in residence from September through May at Research Triangle Park of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill. The Institute invites scholars across all fields of the humanities working on material for publication in any area of study to apply. Stipends of up to $60,000 are awarded and travel expenses are provided.