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This year’s DHCS Colloquium will be hosted by Northwestern University on November 21st – 22nd, 2010. Until the conference website is launched, please contact Prof. Martin Mueller at Northwestern for further details.

Our new journal, the Proceedings of the Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (JDHCS), has finally been published. Please check it out!

We are pleased to announce that the 2009 Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS) will be organized and hosted by the Illinois Institute of Technology, November 14-16, 2009.

The goal of the 2009 DHCS Colloquium, as in previous years, is to bring together scholars and researchers in both the Humanities and Computer Science to collaborate on deepening the current state of Digital Humanities as a field of intellectual inquiry and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research.

Call for Papers:

A formal call for papers will be issued shortly; please watch the DHCS blog (http://lingcog.iit.edu/~dhcs2009).

Important Dates & Deadlines:

* DHCS Colloquium: November 14-16.
* Deadline for Submissions: August 30
* Notification of Acceptance: September 15
* Full Program Announcement: September 24

Contact:

For further information, please email dhcs2009@iit.edu.


Shlomo Argamon, Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
Illinois Institute of Technology
Chicago, IL 60616, USA

A huge thanks to everyone who participated and helped organize this year’s DHCS colloquium and helped to make it a successful event. 

In a day or two we’ll be sending out notes to our paper and poster presenters asking them to prepare their materials for inclusion in the online DHCS Colloquium Proceedings. Until then, please check out the live blog archives to find references to sites, papers etc. mentioned during the paper and keynote presentations.

See you next year at the Illinois Institute of Technology!

We closed our online registration late yesterday afternoon. 129 people have registered for the colloquium plus a handful more via email. We’ll have to stop accepting registrants when we reach 150. Thus far, 62 people have indicated that they will be attending the Saturday pre-colloquium. 116 have signed up for the Sunday sessions and 119 for Monday. About 70 people will be attending the Sunday banquet and keynote.

Out of all registrants, just over 50% are either faculty or students. IT and library/press staff make up about 20% each and the remaining 10% are from funding agencies, individual consultants and industry.

James Coltrain
Ph.D. candidate
History
Northwestern University

Fields of Interest: Imaging/Visualization, Libraries/Digital Archives, Modelling/Simulations

James Coltrain is a doctoral candidate in Early American History at Northwestern University. His academic interests include using studies of material and visual culture to address questions of social and cultural history. He is currently writing a dissertation on the architecture and society of the fortified imperial communities of 18th-century North America. He is also very interested in the use of new media, both to present scholarly findings and for public outreach. James has completed virtual 3D reconstructions of the original Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, the medieval city of Metz, and a number of colonial forts as part of his work on historical visualization.

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.  

Clovis Gladstone
Ph.D. candidate
Romance Languages and Literatures
University of Chicago

Fields of Interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Information Retrieval, Computational Linguistics, Libraries/Digital Archives, Electronic Literature, Semantic Search, Performance, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.  

Matthew Bouchard
MA Student
Humanities Computing
University of Alberta

Fields of Interest: Imaging/Visualization, Libraries/Digital Archives, Gaming, Augmented Reality, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.  

Sarah Schmidt
MSLIS student
Syracuse University

Fields of Interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Libraries/Digital Archives, Gaming, Electronic Literature, Computational Art

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here. 

Catherine Keich
Graduate Student
Department of Technical Communication
Illinois Institute of Technology

Fields of Interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Imaging/Visualization, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Semantic Search, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here. 

Cora Angier Sowa
Ph.D.
Minerva Systems

http://www.minervaclassics.com

Hello! I am an independent scholar working under the name “Minerva Systems.” I am currently developing a suite of programs called “The Minerva System for Study of Literary Texts,” a set of interactive tools for building and carrying out a project using the computer to study literary material. It uses methods of project planning borrowed from the scientific and commercial world, in which I worked for a number of years. Also included are programs to perform specific tasks, such as content/cluster analysis. The interactive part includes lots of pictures and other graphic material. My adaptation of these methods is based on classes I taught in the English Department of St. John’s University (New York). (I think my ideal target audience would be students and scholars of literature who like to play video games!)

As a scholar and by training, I am a Classicist. My scholarly specialty is ancient Greek oral epic — Homer, Hesiod, and (especially) the Homeric Hymns, the subject of my book, “Traditional Themes and the Homeric Hymns.” I have also written on the persistence of mythic themes (such as the Journey to the Underworld, the Meeting with the Goddess) from ancient epic (the popular entertainment of their day) in today’s movies. This summer’s “WALL-E” was a great example!

Fields of Interest: Text Analysis , Information Retrieval, Gaming, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here. 

Doug McDonald
Ph.D. candidate
History of Culture
University of Chicago

Fields of Interest: Computational Art, Performance, Collaborative Technologies, Music Cognition

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here. 

Abra Johnson
Lecturer Sociology/M.A./applying for Ph.D.
City Colleges of Chicago/Thick Routes Performance Collage

http://cbdcollaboration.wetpaint.com/

My past research and current interests encompass an examination of the critical role of hip-hop music as a U. S. “ambassador” to the global markets of identity, culture, and economics negotiated in the realm of mass-mediated popular cultures. Using hip-hop as a template for future studies incorporating Chicago house music, I seek to move beyond the well-known but oversimplified dichotomy of hegemony and resistance that frames sociological analyses of hip-hop, overlook the critical importance and reflection of the artists’ sociocultural capital as (U.S.) Americans (not just African-American, Latino, Asian-American, etc.), and exclude the complex implications of the music produced by women. Key foci for me include the nuanced/subtle, the sometimes oppressive/contradictory, and the resistive/expansive performative and lyrical practices and symbols, carried and expressed by women in hip-hop, and especially house, as they concurrently act as socializers of culture, both at home and abroad.

I am currently assisting in the development of a wiki site Consuming Blackness Diasporically, that explores black cultural expressive traditions in a setting of global dialogue. Connecting communities in Chicago/US, Trinidad and Brazil, the CBD project moves from mapping each unique cultural form and practice (house, rapso/pan/folk/orisha, and capoeira) to exploring the creative dialogue that emerges by putting these expressive traditions in conversation with each other.

Fields of Interest: Text Analysis, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Electronic Literature, Performance, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Wade Chandler
Adjunct Instructor
IAM
Columbia College

Visual Arts, Vjing, Peggy 2.0, Sculpture, Sound

Fields of Interest: Imaging/Visualization, Computational Art, Performance, Collaborative Technologies, Music Cognition

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Stéfan Sinclair
Associate Professor
Communication Studies & Multimedia
McMaster University
http://stefansinclair.name/

Stéfan Sinclair is an Associate Professor of Multimedia. His areas of interest include content analysis and data mining, experimental visualization interfaces, computational linguistics, and database design. He is the creator or co-developer of online Digital Humanities tools such as HyperPo (hyperpo.org), the TAPoR Portal (portal.tapor.ca), the Humanities Visualization Project (humviz.org), and BonPatron (bonpatron.com).

Interests: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Imaging/Visualization, Information Retrieval, Computational Linguistics, Mobile Devices, Semantic Search, Collaborative Technologies, Serendipity..

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Jim Hodge
Ph.D. candidate
English Department
University of Chicago
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/blogs/newmedia/

I’m interested in media theory and history, film theory, digital literature, and more specifically the status of history in information culture and aesthetics.

Interests: Electronic Literature, Computational Art, Cinematic Syntax

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Tim Allen
Programmer/Researcher
Romance Languages and Literatures
University of Chicago

I work for the ARTFL Project at the University of Chicago.

Interests: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Computational Linguistics, Computational Art, Libraries/Archives

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Patrick Juola
Associate Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Duquesne University
http://www.mathcs.duq.edu

I’m interested in developing programs for text analysis, and in particular for authorship attribution, concept analysis and index generation, and for the generation of conjectures for DH research.

Interests: Text Analysis, Computational Linguistics

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Adeniyi Olusegun Joseph
Student
University of Ibadan

Interests: Computational Linguistics, Mobile Devices

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

John Noecker Jr.
Undergraduate Student
Computer Science and Mathematics
Duquesne University

I am an undergraduate student at Duquesne University pursuing a double major in Computer Science and Mathematics. For the past year and a half I have been working with Dr. Juola on the Java Graphical Authorship Attribution Package (JGAAP), which I have recently begun to use for more interesting problems, such as the one I will be presenting at the colloquium.

My research interests include text classification, particularly authorship attribution, and machine learning techniques. I also studied classification techniques for speaker verification at the 2008 CLSP Workshop on Human Language Technologies at the Johns Hopkins University. I will graduate in May of 2009 with a B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics, and hope to go on to study machine learning and text classification at the PhD level next fall.

Interests: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis, Computational Linguistics

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

William Brockman
Librarian
Penn State University

Interests: Libraries/Digital Archives, Electronic Literature

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Chris Mackie
Associate Program Officer, RIT
The Andrew W Mellon Foundation

Interests: Libraries/Digital Archives

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Diane Harvey
Undergraduate Studies Librarian
University Libraries
University of Maryland

I work with undergraduate students across all disciplines in the areas of reference and instructional services.

Interests: Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Lee Konrad
Director, Memorial Library
UW-Madison
http://www.library.wisc.edu/

I am the Director of Memorial Library, the Humanities and Social Science research library.

Interests: Text Analysis , Imaging/Visualization, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Mobile Devices, Electronic Literature

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Freddrick Logan
Ph.D. candidate
Lewis Department of Humanities
Illinois Institute of Technology
http://freddricklogan.com

I’m a Ph.D. student at the Illinois Institute of Technology. My area of activity is in Technical and Scientific Communications. I’m interested in conducting research in distance learning, open source technology, as well as pedagogy in technological driven environments. My credentials are dynamic, ranging from training in computation, digital media, information technology, communication systems, business applications software and end-user consulting. My research interests for my doctoral degree include open source technology, digital media, and scientific communication. Please visit my website@ http://freddricklogan.com.

Interests: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Imaging/Visualization, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Augmented Reality, Computational Art, Augmented Reality, Semantic Search, Performance, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Stephen Pentecost
Digital Humanities Specialist
Humanities Digital Workshop
Washington University in St. Louis

Interests: Text Analysis , Imaging/Visualization , Computation Linguistics, Gaming, Modelling/Simulations

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Paul A. Youngman
Associate Professor of German
Center for Humanities, Technology, and Science
University of North Carolina-Charlotte
http://www.htas.uncc.edu

I am an associate professor of German with a primary research focus on the cultural reception of various technologies from the railway to the computer. I am interested in humanities computing as a way of representing my next project rather than the traditional monograph format. I am currently working on developing a joint workshop between my university and a German university dealing with digital humanities.

Interests: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Imaging/Visualization, Augmented Reality, Modelling/Simulations, Electronic Literature

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Stan Ruecker
Assistant Professor
Humanities Computing Program and Dept of English & Film Studies
University of Alberta
http://www.ualberta.ca/~sruecker

I work primarily in humanities visualization and experimental interfaces for online collections.

Interests: Imaging/Visualization, Electronic Literature

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

After some initial glitches our online registration form is now open. N.B. Attendance at DHCS is open to all. There are no registration fees.

Although online registration will remain open until October 27th, we’d like to encourage you to register sooner rather than later. This helps us project attendance numbers for the colloquium and ensure that we have enough food and drink on hand for everyone.

The full colloquium schedule and program has now been posted. We expect to open registration sometime tomorrow.

Unfortunately we’re running a little late on both – but we’ll have these up late today or early tomorrow. Please check back again soon.

I’d like to thank everyone who submitted paper and poster proposals to the colloquium. We were especially pleased to note a large number of proposals from faculty and students and a significant contingent of proposals from outside the country (hello, Canadians!).

The program committee has completed their review and I expect to email everyone their decisions later today.

Thank you again – the success of the colloquium rests largely upon your efforts.

It was just pointed out to us that we list the DHCS deadline as “August 31st” at the top of the Call for Papers but then later on, under “Important Deadlines”, as “Monday, August 31st”. I apologize for the confusion. This should have read “Sunday, August 31st” instead.

If anyone mistook this to mean Monday, Sept. 1st – no harm done. Please feel free to give yourself another day, although we would be very grateful if your submissions is in by 6pm on Sept. 1st.

Again, with apologies.. To avoid confusing people any further I will leave the existing typo in place.

Scott Branting, director of the Oriental Institute’s Center for Middle Eastern Landscapes (CAMEL) at the University of Chicago is looking for DHCS attendees who may want to participate in a hands-on, pre-colloquium GIS workshop.

Please contact Scott directly if you would like to learn more about GIS (Graphic Information Systems) for the Humanities or help organize the workshop or a GIS birds-of-a-feather meeting.

Jason Rhody from the NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities has offered to hold a pre-colloquium workshop for attendees on Nov. 1st on grants programs in the digital humanities.

This is a great opportunity to meet a program officer and learn how best to apply for one of the many grants administered by the NEH.

More details to follow.

The talented crew at Studio Blue has created a beautiful poster for us to advertise the DHCS colloquium. Next week I’ll send out a few copies of this in tabloid format to various digital humanities centers. If you’d like some for your institution as well please drop us a line.

DHCS Poster

Here is a link to download a larger version of this image as a PDF file.


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Welcome to the website of the third annual Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS).

If you’re unfamiliar with DHCS, please see our homepage for a brief overview and a description of some of the additions we’ve made to this year’s event. In the days ahead we’ll be updating this blog regularly with news and announcements related to the colloquium. Until then, please see the “Call for Papers” copied below (deadline: August 31st).

Please feel free to use make use of the blog comments or email us at dhcs-conference@listhost.uchicago.edu for questions, comments etc. You can also contact us and track our updates on our Twitter page, dhcs2008.

Call for Papers

DHCS Colloquium, November 1 – 3, 2008
Submission Deadline: August 31, 2008

The goal of the annual Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS) is to bring together researchers and scholars in the humanities and computer science to examine the current state of digital humanities as a field of intellectual inquiry and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research. The first DHCS Colloquium in 2006 examined the challenges and opportunities posed by the “million books” digitization projects. The second DHCS Colloquium in 2007 focused on searching and querying as both tools and methodologies.

The theme of the third Chicago DHCS Colloquium is “Making Sense” – an exploration of how meaning is created and apprehended at the transition from the digital to the analog.

We invite submissions from scholars, researchers and students on all topics that intersect current theory and practice in the humanities and computer science.

Sponsored by the Humanities Division, the Computation Institute, NSIT Academic Technologies and the University Library at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and the College of Science and Letters at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Website:

http://dhcs.uchicago.edu

Location:

The University of Chicago
Ida Noyes Hall
1212 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

Keynote Speakers:

Oren Etzioni is director of the Turing Center and professor of computer science at the University of Washington where his current research interests include fundamental problems in the study of artificial intelligence, web search, machine reading, and machine learning. Etzioni was the founder of Farecast, a company that utilizes data mining techniques to anticipate airfare fluctuations, and the KnowItAll project, which is is building domain-independent systems to extract information from the Web in an autonomous, scalable manner. Etzioni has published extensively in his field and served as an associate editor of the ACM Transactions on the Web and on the editorial board of the Journal of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, amongst others.

Martin Wattenberg is a computer scientist and new media artist whose work focuses on the visual explorations of culturally significant data (http://www.bewitched.com/). He is the founding manager of IBM’s Visual Communication Lab, which researches new forms of visualization and how they can enable better collaboration. The lab’s latest project is Many Eyes, an experiment in open public data visualization and analysis. Wattenberg is also known for his visualization-based artwork, which has been exhibited at the London Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the New York Museum of Modern Art.

Stephen Downie is associate professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the design and evaluation of IR systems, including multimedia music information retrieval, the political economy of inter-networked communication systems, database design and web-based technologies. Downie is the principal investigator of the International Music Information Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL) which is working on producing a large, secure corpus of audio and symbolic music data accessible to the music information retrieval (MIR) community.

Program Committee:

* Prof. Shlomo Argamon, Computer Science department, Illinois Institute of Technology
* Prof. Helma Dik, Department of Classics, University of Chicago
* Prof. John Goldsmith, Department of Linguistics, Computer Science, Computation Institute, University of Chicago
* Dr. Catherine Mardikes, Bibliographer for Classics, the Ancient Near East, and General Humanities, University of Chicago Library
* Prof. Robert Morrissey, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Director of the ARTFL Project, University of Chicago
* Prof. Martin Mueller, Department of English and Classics, Northwestern University
* Dr. Mark Olsen, Associate Director of the ARTFL Project, University of Chicago
* Prof. Anne Rogers, Department of Computer Science, University of Chicago
* Prof. Jason Salavon, Department of Visual Arts, Computation Institute, University of Chicago
* Prof. Kotoka Suzuki, Department of Music, Visual Arts, University of Chicago
* Prof. Gary Tubb, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

Call for Participation:

Participation in the colloquium is open to all. We welcome submissions for:

* Paper presentations (20 minute maximum)
* Poster sessions
* Software demonstrations
* Performances
* Pre-conference tutorials/workshops/seminars
* Pre-conference “birds of a feather” meetings

Preliminary Colloquium Schedule:

DHCS will begin with a half-day, pre-conference on Saturday, November 1 offering introductory tutorials and/or seminars on topics such as text analysis/data-mining or GIS (Geographic Information Systems) applications for the humanities. We also encourage colloquium attendees to use the pre-conference period for informal “birds of a feather” meetings on topics of common interest (e.g. “digital archaeology”).

The formal DHCS colloquium program runs from Sunday, November 2 to Monday, November 3 and will consist of four, 1-1/2 hour paper panels and two, two-hour poster sessions as well as three keynotes. Generous time has been set aside for questions and follow-up discussions after each panel and in the schedule breaks. There are no parallel sessions.

For further details, please see the preliminary colloquium schedule.

Suggested Submission Topics:

* Computing Cinematic Syntax
* Statistical Analyses and Literary Meaning
* Visualizing Humanist Data: Lessons from Industry & Big Science
* Sound, Video & Image based Information Retrieval
* Genetic Algorithms and Computational Intelligence
* Web Services for Humanist Scholarship
* Serious Gaming / Meaningful Play
* Cartography and the Digital Traveler / GIS Applications for the Humanities
* Representing Reading Time
* Computer-mediated Interaction
* Gestural & Haptic Control for Music Composition
* Deconstructing Machine Learning
* Recognizing and Modeling Objects, Scenes & Events in 2D, 3D and Video
* Contemporary Art / Creative Technologies
* Historicizing Machine Learning Ontologies
* Cyberinfrastructure and High-Performance Computing for the Humanities
* Programming Algorithmic Art
* Virtual Acoustic Space and Aural Architecture
* Eye Tracking & Scene Perception in the Cinema
* Future Interactive Fictions
* Semantic Search / Semantic Web
* Automatic Extraction and Analysis of Natural Language Style Elements
* Music Perception and Cognition
* Social Scholarship / Socialized Search
* Multi-agent Systems for Modeling Language Change
* Empirical Philosophy / Affective Computing / Augmented Vision

Submission Format:

Please submit a (2 page maximum) abstract in Adobe PDF (preferred) or MS Word format to dhcs-submissions@listhost.uchicago.edu.

Graduate Student Travel Fund:

A limited number of bursaries are available to assist graduate students who are presenting at the colloquium with their travel and accommodation expenses. No separate application form is required. Current graduate students whose proposals have been accepted will be contacted by the organizers with more details.

Important Dates:

Deadline for Submissions: Monday, August 31
Notification of Acceptance: Monday, September 15
Full Program Announcement: Monday, September 22
Registration: Monday, September 22 – Friday, October 24
Colloquium: Saturday, November 1 – Monday, November 3

Contact Info:

Please email dhcs-conference@listhost.uchicago.edu or tweet dhcs2008.

Organizing Committee:

* Arno Bosse, Senior Director for Technology, Humanities Division, University of Chicago.
* Helma Dik, Department of Classics, University of Chicago
* Catherine Mardikes, Bibliographer for Classics, the Ancient Near East, and General Humanities, University of Chicago Library.
* Mark Olsen, Associate Director, ARTFL Project, University of Chicago


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