This year’s DHCS Colloquium will be hosted by Northwestern University on November 21st – 22nd, 2010. Until the conference website is launched, please contact Prof. Martin Mueller at Northwestern for further details.

Our new journal, the Proceedings of the Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (JDHCS), has finally been published. Please check it out!

We are pleased to announce that the 2009 Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS) will be organized and hosted by the Illinois Institute of Technology, November 14-16, 2009.

The goal of the 2009 DHCS Colloquium, as in previous years, is to bring together scholars and researchers in both the Humanities and Computer Science to collaborate on deepening the current state of Digital Humanities as a field of intellectual inquiry and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research.

Call for Papers:

A formal call for papers will be issued shortly; please watch the DHCS blog (http://lingcog.iit.edu/~dhcs2009).

Important Dates & Deadlines:

* DHCS Colloquium: November 14-16.
* Deadline for Submissions: August 30
* Notification of Acceptance: September 15
* Full Program Announcement: September 24

Contact:

For further information, please email dhcs2009@iit.edu.


Shlomo Argamon, Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
Illinois Institute of Technology
Chicago, IL 60616, USA

A huge thanks to everyone who participated and helped organize this year’s DHCS colloquium and helped to make it a successful event. 

In a day or two we’ll be sending out notes to our paper and poster presenters asking them to prepare their materials for inclusion in the online DHCS Colloquium Proceedings. Until then, please check out the live blog archives to find references to sites, papers etc. mentioned during the paper and keynote presentations.

See you next year at the Illinois Institute of Technology!

Day One / Session One (Discovering Provocative Patterns with Text Mining)

Click here to launch the live-blog.

Day One / Session Two (Visualizing Textual and Social Networks)

Click here to launch the live-blog.

Day One / Keynote

Click here to launch the live-blog.

Day Two / Session One (The Art of Making Sense: Simulations and Visualizations)

Click here to launch the live-blog.

Day Two / Keynote

Click here to launch the live-blog.

Day Two / Session Two (Sense, Class and Variation in Digital Textuality)

Click here to launch the live-blog.

We closed our online registration late yesterday afternoon. 129 people have registered for the colloquium plus a handful more via email. We’ll have to stop accepting registrants when we reach 150. Thus far, 62 people have indicated that they will be attending the Saturday pre-colloquium. 116 have signed up for the Sunday sessions and 119 for Monday. About 70 people will be attending the Sunday banquet and keynote.

Out of all registrants, just over 50% are either faculty or students. IT and library/press staff make up about 20% each and the remaining 10% are from funding agencies, individual consultants and industry.

Martin Wattenberg
IBM Visual Communication Lab
http://www.bewitched.com/

Martin Wattenberg is a computer scientist and new media artist whose work focuses on the visual explorations of culturally significant data (http://www.bewitched.com/). He is the founding manager of IBM’s Visual Communication Lab, which researches new forms of visualization and how they can enable better collaboration. The lab’s latest project is Many Eyes, an experiment in open public data visualization and analysis. Wattenberg is also known for his visualization-based artwork, which has been exhibited at the London Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the New York Museum of Modern Art.

J. Stephen Downie
Associate Professor
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dr. J. Stephen Downie is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School
of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is Director International Music Information
Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL). Professor Downie is
Principal Investigator on the Networked Environment for Music Analysis
(NEMA) and the Music-to-Knowledge (M2K) music data-mining
projects. He has been very active in the establishment of the Music
Information Retrieval and Music Digital Library communities through his
ongoing work with the ISMIR series of MIR conferences as a member of the
ISMIR steering committee.

Fields of Interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Collaborative Technologies, Music Cognition

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Peter Robinson
Director
Institution for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing
University of Birmingham
itsee.bham.ac.uk

Peter Robinson is Co-Director of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham, UK. He is developer of the texual-editing program Collate, used by many textual editing projects worldwide, and of the Anastasia electronic publishing system. He is director of the Canterbury Tales Project, and was editor of its first major electronic publication, The Wife of Bath’s Prologue on CD-ROM (Cambridge UP, 1996.) He has published and lectured on matters relating to computing and textual editing, on text encoding, digitization, and electronic publishing, and on Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. He is active in the development of standards for digital resources, as a past board member of the Text Encoding Initiative and as leader of the EU funded MASTER project.

Fields of interest: Text Analysis, Imaging/Visualization, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Electronic Literature

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Drayton C. Benner
Ph.D. student
Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Chicago

I am a PhD student at the University of Chicago in Northwest Semitic Philology and also do software development for a small company that makes ancient texts available electronically (among other things), having studied computer science and math as an undergrad and worked as a software engineer before turning my attention to semitics.

Fields of interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Mobile Devices, Performance

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Oren Etzioni
Professor
Computer Science & Engineering
University of Washington
http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/etzioni/

Fields of interest:Data Mining/Machine Learning, Semantic Search

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Richard Whaling
M.S. candidate
Computer Science
University of Chicago

Fields of interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Information Retrieval, Computational Linguistics

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Charles M. Cooney
Ph.D.
ARTFL Project

Fields of interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Information Retrieval

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Ron Zacharski
Assistant Professor
Computer Science
University of Mary Washington
www.zacharski.org

Fields of interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Text Analysis , Information Retrieval, Computational Linguistics

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.

Patti O’Shea
Executive Director IT
UChicago Press

Fields of interest: Data Mining/Machine Learning, Information Retrieval, Libraries/Digital Archives, Electronic Literature, Collaborative Technologies

Please see our online registration page to find out why we’re posting participant information here.