Blog Archives

Instructors of Russian and Uzbek, 2011 Summer Critical Languages Institute, Arizona State University, Application Deadline March 4

Instructor of Elementary Russian (Posted 2010-02-15)

Arizona State University is seeks faculty associates to teach intensive Elementary Russian in its 2011 summer Critical Languages Institute. Candidates must have a Master’s degree in Russian linguistics or a closely related field; possess native or near-native proficiency in both Russian and English; and demonstrate the ability to teach an intensive elementary course in standard Russian. Preferred candidates will have experience teaching Russian to non-Russian speakers in an intensive setting. The successful candidates will teach Russian four hours daily, five days a week, for eight weeks, under the direction of CLI’s lead instructor for Russian, and will be called upon to contribute to cultural programming.

Information on the ASU summer Russian program is available at http://cli.asu.edu/russian.

Applications received by March 4, 2011 will have first priority. Thereafter applications will be reviewed weekly until the search is closed.

Application package must include a detailed letter of interest stating qualifications and teaching experience; a CV; and a list of three references. Materials should be sent to cli@asu.edu or mailed to Russian Search Committee, Critical Languages Institute, PO Box 874202, Tempe, AZ, 85287-4202.

Background check is required for employment. Arizona State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to excellence through diversity. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Please see ASU’s complete non-discrimination statement at:https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/ .

Instructor of Intermediate Uzbek (Posted 2010-02-15)

Arizona State University is seeks a faculty associate to teach intensive Intermediate Uzbek in its 2011 summer Critical Languages Institute. Candidates must have a Master’s degree in Turkic or Central Asian linguistics or a closely related field; possess native or near-native proficiency in both Uzbek and English; and demonstrate the ability to teach an intensive intermediate course in standard Uzbek. Preferred candidates will have experience teaching Uzbek to non-Uzbek speakers. The successful candidate will teach Uzbek four hours daily, five days a week, for eight weeks, in coordination with and under the direction of CLI’s lead instructor for Uzbek, and will be called upon to contribute to cultural programming.

Information on the ASU summer Uzbek program is available at http://cli.asu.edu/uzbek.

Applications received by March 4, 2011 will have first priority. Thereafter applications will be reviewed weekly until the search is closed.

Application package must include a detailed letter of interest stating qualifications and teaching experience; a CV; and a list of three references. Materials should be sent to cli@asu.edu or mailed to Uzbek Search Committee, Critical Languages Institute, PO Box 874202, Tempe, AZ, 85287-4202.

Background check is required for employment. Arizona State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to excellence through diversity. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Please see ASU’s complete non-discrimination statement at:https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/ .

Posted in: Job Postings
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Lecturers in Uyghur, Kazakh, Uzbek or Tajik, Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute, University of Wisconsin, Application Deadline March 1

The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison seeks qualified lecturers in Uyghur, Kazakh, Uzbek or Tajik to teach at the Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute, CESSI, in summer 2011. We appreciate your help in bringing this announcement to the attention of qualified candidates.

The full position vacancy listing can be found on the UW-Madison Office of Human Resources Web site: http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/pvl/pv_066348.html

More information about CESSI 2011 at UW-Madison can be found here: http://creeca.wisc.edu/cessi

Posted in: Job Postings
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Film: Uzbek Rhapsody: The Films of Ali Khamraev, Gene Siskel Film Center, February 12 – March 3

From our friends at Siskel Film Center:

Uzbek Rhapsody: The Films of Ali Khamraev

“If there is a giant who sits astride the history of Uzbek cinema, it’s Ali Khamraev, one of those rare talents like Welles or Godard or Scorsese whose love for the medium is so intense that his best films burst with criss-crossing energies and insights, like a fireworks display.”—Kent Jones, Film Comment

From February 12 through March 3, the Gene Siskel Film Center, in collaboration with Seagull Films, presents Uzbek Rhapsody: The Films of Ali Khamraev, a series of eight rarely seen films shown in 35mm prints specially imported from Russia and Central Asia for this touring retrospective.

This series highlights the work not only of an overlooked director but also of a rich and under-explored frontier on the cinematic map. The cinema of the Central Asian Soviet republics–sometimes referred to as “the ‘stans”–began to emerge from the shadow of the USSR in the 1960s, with the decline of Stalinist orthodoxy and increased investment in regional film industries. In recent years, following the breakup of the Soviet Union, Central Asian cinema has come even more sharply into focus, with the growing recognition of distinct filmmaking traditions in each of its nations, and of a group of major filmmakers ripe for discovery in the west, including Tolomush Okeev of Kyrgyzstan, Darezhan Omirbaev and Ardak Amirkulov of Kazakhstan, and, preeminently, Ali Khamraev of Uzbekistan.

Born in the Uzbek capital of Tashkent in 1937, Khamraev made his directing debut in 1964 and first attracted critical attention with the 1966 adultery drama WHITE, WHITE STORKS (playing Feb. 12 & 14). He achieved popular success in the late 1960s and 1970s with a series of action films set in Central Asia during the civil wars of 1920s: RED SANDS (1969), THE EXTRAORDINARY COMMISAR (1970), THE BODYGUARD (1979, playing Feb. 19 & 24), and his biggest hit, THE SEVENTH BULLET (1972, playing Feb. 26 & 28). Resembling American and spaghetti westerns, these films deftly mix ideological issues with superb action scenes and stunning landscapes. As critic Olaf Möller (Film Comment) notes, “Khamraev is a born storyteller…a Genghis Khan-ian giant of genre filmmaking.”

Khamraev also began expanding his range, becoming “a director of extraordinary versatility” (Peter Rollberg, Historical Dictionary of Russian and Soviet Cinema). MAN FOLLOWS BIRDS (1975, playing Feb. 12 & 16), perhaps his most acclaimed film, is a phantasmagoric medieval odyssey that evokes Paradjanov and Tarkovsky (the latter both an inspiration and a personal friend). There are strong autobiographical elements in his period pieces TRIPTYCH (1979, playing Feb. 19 & 21) and I REMEMBER YOU (1986, playing Feb. 20 & 23). Khamraev also directed musicals, documentaries, and historical epics. Recurring themes in his films include the oppression of women (most strongly exemplified by 1971’s WITHOUT FEAR, playing Feb. 13 & 17) and the conflict between traditional and progressive forces. In the 1990s, Khamraev relocated to Italy; the offbeat sexual parable BO BA BU (1998, playing Feb. 26 & Mar. 3), his only film completed during this period, was a focus of controversy at several international film festivals. In 2004 he returned to Russia, where he has directed television miniseries.

This project is organized by Seagull Films in collaboration with Mardjani Foundation. Special thanks to Alla Verlotsky of Seagull Films.

—Martin Rubin

MAN FOLLOWS BIRDS (CHELOVEK UKHODIT ZA PTITSAMI) 1975, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 87 min.With Dzhanik Faiziyev, Dilorom Kambarova

WHITE, WHITE STORKS (BELIYE, BELIYE AISTI) 1966, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 82 min.With Lyutfi Sarymsakova, Sairam Isayeva

WITHOUT FEAR (BEZ STRAKHA) 1971, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 96 min.

THE BODYGUARD (TELOKHRANITEL) 1979, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Tadzhikistan, 91 min. With Aleksandr Kaidanovsky, Gulya Tashbayeva

TRIPTYCH (TRIPTIKH) 1979, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 76 min. With Dilorom Kambarova, Gulya Tashbayeva

I REMEMBER YOU (YA TEBYA POMNYU) 1985, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 92 min. With Vyacheslav Bogachyov, Zinaida Sharko

THE SEVENTH BULLET (SEDYMAYA PULYA) 1972, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 84 min. With Suimenkul Chokmorov, Dilorom Kambarova

BO BA BU 1998, Ali Khamraev, Uzbekistan/Italy/France, 82 min. With Arielle Dombasle, Abdrashid Abdrakhmanov

Posted in: Chicago Events
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Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations to Offer Autumn Courses in Elementary and Intermediate Uzbek and Kazakh

These are recent additions to the autumn 2010 course offerings. If you are interested in enrolling in either Uzbek or Kazakh in 2010-11, please contact NELC (email address below). Thank you!!!

Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Courses for Autumn 2010

We have the opportunity to offer the following languages:
UZKB 10101 – Elementary Uzbek-1
UZKB 20101 – Intermediate Uzbek-1
KAZK 10101 – Elementary Kazakh-1
KAZK 20101 – Intermediate Kazakh-2

Please contact the NELC office at ne-lc@uchicago.edu if you are interested in taking these courses so that arrangements can be made.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.), University of Chicago Events
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Eurasian Regional Language Program in Osh, Kyrgyzstan (Kyrgyz, Uzbek), Deadline: April 1

American Councils for International Education: ACTR/ACCELS invites
applications for the 2010 Eurasian Regional Language Program for language
study at our growing language center in Osh, Kyrgyzstan.

Applications for the Fall 2010 and Academic Year 2010-2011 programs are due
April 1st, 2010. See http://www.aceurasiaabroad.org/kyrgyzstan for
applications and more information.

The Eurasian Regional Language Program in Osh provides graduate students,
advanced undergraduates, scholars, and working professionals intensive
instruction in Uzbek and Kyrgyz. Participants may enroll in semester,
academic year, or summer programs. Courses are designed to strengthen
speaking, listening, reading, and writing proficiency in Uzbek or Kyrgyz.

Program features include:
*Core language courses focusing on grammar and lexical studies, phonetics,
vocabulary development, and conversational skills;
*Area studies, literature, and culture classes for advanced students;
*Classes conducted in small groups of three to six students or in private
tutorials;
*Native-speaking faculty with extensive experience teaching foreign students;
*Homestays with local families;
*Undergraduate or graduate credit from Bryn Mawr College;
*Pre-departure orientation in Washington, D.C.;
*and logistical support provided by local American Councils offices.

Applicants with at least two years of college-level instruction in Kyrgyz,
Uzbek, or Russian are eligible to apply to the program.

Substantial fellowships are available through American Councils from U.S.
Department of State (Title VIII) and U.S. Department of Education
(Fulbright-Hays) grant support. Recent program participants have also
received fellowship support from the National Security Education Program
(http://www.borenawards.org/), the Benjamin A. Gilman International
Scholarship (http://www.iie.org/gilman), and the U.S. Department of
Education Title VI (FLAS).

American Councils also offers intensive language study programs in Armenia,
Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan,
and Ukraine. For more information on these programs, visit
http://www.aceurasiaabroad.org/.

Questions can be sent to outbound@americancouncils.org.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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