Blog Archives

Disseration: “Viktor Shklovskii–between Art and Life,” Radoslav Borislavov

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Colloquium: “Stanisław Brzozowski and His Sociology of Self,” Dr. Roma Sendyaka, May 18

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events
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Lecturer and Language Assistants positions 2011-2012, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Application Deadline April 29

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

THE DEPARTMENT OF SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

TEACHING POSITIONS

2011-2012

DEADLINE: Friday, April 29, 2011

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is soliciting applications
for the following positions in the 2011-2012 Slavic Languages and Literatures program.
All positions are dependent on availability of funds, final budgetary approval, and sufficient enrollments.

Lecturers

Russian: Elementary Russian, Russian through Pushkin, 2nd-Year Russian, Russian through Literary Readings, Russian for Heritage Learners, Russian Culture (see NOTE)
Czech: Elementary Czech, Intermediate Czech

Language Assistants

Russian: Elementary Russian, Russian through Pushkin, 2nd-Year Russian, Russian through Literary Readings,
3rd-Year Russian, 4th-Year Russian, Advanced Russian

Polish: Elementary, Intermediate
Czech: Elementary, Intermediate
Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian: Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced

Requirements

Applicants for all positions should have completed the course ’Teaching in Slavic Languages & Literatures’ (SLAV 31500) or equivalent training in language pedagogy.
Applicants for lectureships are normally expected to have served previously as language assistants or course assistants.

Those interested in any of these positions should submit: 

1) a completed application form (attached) and 2) a current CV to:

“Teaching Positions”
c/o Dr. Steven Clancy
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures (Foster 406)

Electronic submissions may be made by email to <sclancy@uchicago.edu>.


NOTE: Applicants for the Russian Culture (RUSS 244) course should note the following:
1) this course is taught by a team of two graduate student co-lecturers,
2) applicant teams should submit a course proposal and syllabus with their application,
3) this is a one quarter course that can be offered Aut, Win, or Spr; and
4) applicant teams should consult with Prof. Robert Bird or Prof. Malynne Sternstein before applying.

Application forms available in Foster 406 and here: slavicteaching2011(fill-in)

 

Posted in: Job Postings, University of Chicago Events
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Concert: “Slavic Wonders: Feasts and Saints in Early Russia, Poland & Bohemia,” Rose Ensemble, Rockefeller Chapel, April 29

Rose Ensemble Friday, April 29, 2011, 7:30 – 9:30pm
Location Rockefeller Memorial Chapel
5850 South Woodlawn Avenue
Building/Room Rockefeller Chapel
Primary Sponsor Chicago Presents
Performance Title “Slavic Wonders: Feasts and Saints in Early Russia, Poland & Bohemia”
Performer(s) Rose Ensemble
Cost $35 / $5 Students
Ticket Phone 773.702.8068
Contact Name Chicago Presents
Contact E-mail chicagopresents@uchicago.edu
Contact Phone 773.702.8068
Campus Map maps.uchicago.edu
Event Description “The evening was notable for its air of informality and the infectious sense of enthusiasm exhibited by the performers….” (Berkshire Eagle)

Howard Mayer Brown International Early Music Series
Friday, April 29, 2011, 7:30 p.m.
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel
The Rose Ensemble

“Slavic Wonders: Feasts and Saints in Early Russia, Poland & Bohemia”
Based in Minnesota and founded by Artistic Director Jordan Sramek, The Rose Ensemble creates imaginative performances of vocal music, connecting each individual to past worlds with stories of spirituality and humanity. Slavic Wonders includes stunning 12-part Baroque motets from the Russian Orthodox tradition, Medieval Latin chants for Slavic saints, and powerful double-choir works from the Polish Renaissance.

Disability Clause Please contact the event sponsor(s) if you require assistance to fully participate in this event.
Link chicagopresents.uchicago.edu

 

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Receiption: Undergraduate Student Reception, The Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, May 20

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CFP: 6th Meeting of the Slavic Linguistics Society (France), Abstract Deadline April 10

Call for papers

The Sixth Annual Meeting of the Slavic Linguistics Society
Université de Provence, Aix-Marseille I, France
1-3 September 2011

We invite you to submit an abstract for the sixth meeting of the Slavic Linguistics Society, to be held on 1-3 September, 2011 at the Université de Provence, in Aix-en-Provence, France.

Keynote speakers:
Greville Corbett (University of Surrey)
Paul Garde (Université de Provence)
Marguerite Guiraud-Weber (Université de Provence)
Jack Feuillet (INALCO, Paris)
Vladimir Plungian (Institute of Linguistics, Moscow)
Zygmunt Saloni (Uniwersytet Warszawski)
Lea Sawicki (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Daniel Weiss (Universität Zürich)

The purpose of the Slavic Linguistic Society is to create a community of students and scholars interested in Slavic linguistics in its broadest sense, that is systematic and scholarly study of the Slavic languages and of the contact between Slavic and non-Slavic languages. The Society aspires to be as open and inclusive as possible; no school, framework, approach, or theory is presupposed, nor is there any restriction in terms of geography, academic affiliation or status.

Papers dealing with any aspect of Slavic linguistics as understood above and within any framework are appropriate, including sociolinguistics, computational linguistics, language acquisition, etc. The only restriction is that all papers should address an issue pertaining to Slavic linguistics as defined above. We encourage everyone to participate and ask you to share this announcement with as many colleagues and students as possible. In view of the openness of our orientation, all papers are expected to be readily intelligible to other scholars, regardless of theoretical orientation.

Extended deadline for abstracts: 10 April 2011.

All abstracts (“SLS_2011_NAME.doc” or “.docx”) should contain the following
information:
(i) title of the paper;
(ii) name of author(s);
(iii) author’s institution;
(iv) author’s e-mail address;
(v) 3-5 key words;
(vi) abstract of the paper (no required lengh);
(vii) bibliography.

Abstracts are invited for 30-minute slots (20-minute presentation plus 10 minutes for discussion).
Selected participants will be notified by the 1st of May 2011.
Conference languages: English, French, and Slavic Languages.
Conference fees: 20 Euros for students (with a valid student ID), 50 Euros for SLS members, 60 Euros for others.
Fees can be payed in cash at the conference registration.

Conference will be held at the Université de Provence, 29 avenue Robert Schuman, 13100 Aix-en-Provence, France.
Conference Homepage: http://gsite.univ-provence.fr/gsite/document.php?pagendx=10750&project=dept-slave
Conference Email:  irina.kor-chahine@univ-provence.fr (with a copy to charles.zaremba@univ-provence.fr)
About Aix-en-Provence (travel information, etc.):
http://en.aixenprovencetourism.com/

We also invite you to visit the Society’s webpage:
http://www.utexas.edu/world/sls/

The organizing committee,
Irina Kor Chahine (Maître de conférences de linguistique russe)
Charles Zaremba (Professeur de linguistique slave)

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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CEERES Friends: Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

This department advances research and provides instruction in the Slavic languages and literatures. The department offers a diverse array of courses in language, linguistics, and literature. Undergraduates may earn degrees with any of the following concentrations: Russian Language and Literature, Russian Linguistics, West Slavic Language & Literature, or Interdisciplinary Studies. Graduate concentrations include Russian Literature, Slavic Linguistics and Languages, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Polish and Czech Studies. The department also offers a joint B.A./M.A. degree in Slavic Languages and Literatures, strongly encourages their students to engage in study abroad opportunities, and sponsors a variety of guest lectures, seminars, and workshops throughout the year.

Check out events happening at the Slavic Department.

Sign up for announcements: slavic department, slavic talks, slavic undergraduates, russian language event.

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“The Poetics of Iterative Narrative and the Miracle of Involuntary Memory in Dostoevsky‘s ‘The Peasant Marei’,” Jennifer Flaherty, Poetry & Poetics Workshop, February 28

Remaining Winter 2011 Poetry & Poetics Workshop Schedule

·         February 28 | Jennifer Flaherty

“The Poetics of Iterative Narrative and the Miracle of Involuntary Memory in Dostoevsky‘s ‘The Peasant Marei’”

For more information or to inquire about presenting, please contact Joel Calahan at [calahan@uchicago.edu].

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Summer 2011 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago, Application Deadline May 15

Summer 2011 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago
* courses in Russian at the first-year and second-year levels
* two 3-week courses in simultaneous interpretation in Russian<->English (open to students at multiple levels)
* all courses run 6 weeks, June 20-July 29, 2011
* these 6 week courses are equivalent to one year (3 quarters) of study in the UofC program during the academic year
* the first-year courses prepare you to satisfy the undergraduate Language Competency requirement in only 6 weeks of study
* courses will be supplemented by weekly lunches from area Slavic restaurants and possible field trips to Russian, Czech, Polish, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian restaurants, shops, etc. in Chicago
Program descriptions are available at:
and registration and tuition details are available from the Graham School at:
_________________________________________________________
Summer 2011 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago
Summer Russian Courses

RUSS 11100 Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 11200 Intensive Introduction to Russian Langauge and Culture 2; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 11300 Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff

RUSS 20111 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20201 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 2; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20301 Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff

RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian); Instructor: Valentina Pichugin
RUSS 21701 Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian); Instructor: Valentina Pichugin

Introductory Russian (1st-year Russian)

RUSS 11100 Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1
RUSS 11200 Intensive Introduction to Russian Langauge and Culture 2
PREREQUISITES: NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED. EQUIVALENT TO ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN (RUSS 10100-10200-10300).

This six-week course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Russian for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Students will also be introduced to Russian culture through readings, screenings, and city outings. The course provides a year of Russian in two 3-week summer quarter courses.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (90 total contact hours). Students must take both courses in the sequence (11100-11200), and will be billed for two courses. This course is suitable for preparing students to satisfy the College Language Competency requirement. Students with FLAS fellowships require an additional 50 contact hours and are required to take RUSS 11300 “Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading”. This course is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

RUSS 11300 Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading
PREREQUISITES: NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED. STUDENTS MUST BE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN RUSS 11100-11200.

This six-week course provides practice in conversation, reading for research, and additional grammar drill complementing material covered in RUSS 11100-11200 “Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1 and 2″. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.

Class meets 2 hours daily, Monday-Thursday (50 total contact hours). There will be one Friday 2-hour session during the first week of class. Students must be concurrently enrolled in RUSS 11100-11200. This course is required for all students with FLAS fellowships and is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTWTh 1:00pm-2:50pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

Intermediate Russian (2nd-year Russian)

RUSS 20111 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1
RUSS 20201 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 2
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 10100-10200-10300/RUSS 10400-10500-10600 OR ONE-YEAR KNOWLEDGE OF RUSSIAN REQUIRED. EQUIVALENT TO SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN (RUSS 20110-20200-20300).

This six-week course provides a comprehensive continuing course in modern Russian for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Russian culture will be explored through readings, screenings, and city outings. The course provides a year of Russian in two 3-week summer quarter courses.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (90 total contact hours). Students must take both courses in the sequence (20111-20201), and will be billed for two courses. Students with FLAS fellowships require an additional 30 contact hours and are required to take RUSS 20301 “Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading”. This course is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

RUSS 20301 Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading
PREREQUISITES: STUDENTS MUST BE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN RUSS 20011-20012.

This six-week course provides practice in conversation, reading for research, and additional grammar drill complementing material covered in RUSS 20011-20012 “Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1 and 2″. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.

Class meets 2 hours daily, Monday-Thursday (50 total contact hours). There will be one Friday 2-hour session during the first week of class. Students must be concurrently enrolled in RUSS 20011-20012. This course is required for all students with FLAS fellowships and is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTWTh 1:00pm-2:50pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

Simultaneous Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)

RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)
PREREQUISITES: FLUENCY IN ENGLISH AND RUSSIAN. STUDENTS WITH NO PRIOR EXPERIENCE IN INTERPRETING WILL WORK FROM THEIR “WEAKER” LANGUAGE INTO THEIR STRONGER; STUDENTS WITH MORE PRACTICE (ADVANCED AND IMMERSION COURSES, TIME LIVING IN RUSSIA, RAISED IN RUSSIAN SPEAKING HOUSEHOLDS, ETC.) WILL PRACTICE BOTH WAYS.

This course introduces students to the field of conference interpretation in general and to consecutive interpretation in particular. It emphasizes the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (Russian/English) and convey it in the target language (English/Russian) in a straightforward and clear manner. The course develops a student’s ability to analyze and paraphrase the meaning of a passage in the source language, and to identify the passage’s components and establish a logical relationship among them. Students will focus on active listening and concentration skills, memory enhancing techniques, and the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall. Basic elements of note-taking will be discussed as well. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret 3-5 minute extemporaneous passages on familiar topics. During practice sessions students will listen to and repeat the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Topics will cover daily life, current events and the media, as well as general areas of students’ interest.
Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (45 total contact hours). [Hyde Park] Session I (3 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Valentina Pichugin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

RUSS 21701 Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian)
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 21700 INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETATION, OR EQUIVALENT; CONSENT OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

This course develops skills and improves techniques acquired in RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation. In consecutive interpretation, the following will be emphasized: clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction and presentation, and strategies for dealing with cultural and linguistic problems. Students will expand their active vocabulary to include terms and idioms frequent in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret extemporaneous passages of moderate difficulty derived from professional settings (sources will vary). Basic strategies for simultaneous interpretation will be introduced, and exercises will be provided to help develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time. The students will work to master voice management, and to acquire smooth delivery techniques. Students will learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent interpretation in the target language with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret 8-10 minute passages from public lectures, radio addresses, interviews, news reports, etc.
Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (45 total contact hours). [Hyde Park] Session II (3 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Valentina Pichugin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European, and Central Asian Languages, Indiana University

Intensive language training has been offered at the Bloomington campus of Indiana University since 1950. The Summer Workshop provides up to 200 participants in Slavic, East European and Central Asian languages the opportunity to complete a full year of college language instruction during an eight-week summer session.

Utilizing the resources of Indiana University’s own specialists as well as native speakers from other universities and abroad, the Summer Workshop has developed and maintained a national program of the highest quality. Allowing all participants to pay in-state tuition fees, the program has as its goal the enhancement of speaking, reading, listening and writing skills through classroom instruction and a full range of extra-curricular activities. Fellowships and funding are available.

Please visit the Program’s website for more information.

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