Blog Archives

Colloquium: “Stanisław Brzozowski and His Sociology of Self,” Dr. Roma Sendyaka, May 18

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events
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Workshop: “Proto-Slavic laws of final syllables and the auslaut treatments of the i-diphthongs”, Yaroslav Gorbachov, Slavic Colloquium, February 14

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Slavic Colloquia – January 2011

William Nickell
“The Author is Dead: Long Live the Author.”
January 12 at 4:30
Foster 103

Sara Pankenier Weld
“Infancy as Device: The Infantile Aesthetic in Russian Formalist Theory.”
January 14 at 4:30
Foster 305

Olga Maiorova
“Forgotten Ancestors: Nineteenth-Century Precursors of the Eurasianists.”
January 19 at 4:30
Foster 103

Rebecca Reich
“Seeking Asylum: What Madness Meant in Late Soviet Culture.”
January 24 at 4:30
Foster 103

Daria Khitrova
TBA
January 26 at 4:30
Foster 103

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The Fifth Annual Meeting of the Slavic Linguistic Society, October 29-31

The Fifth Annual Meeting of the Slavic Linguistic Society
University of Chicago
29-31 October 2010

WORKSHOPS: In conjunction with the meeting, we are holding two workshops:

WORKSHOP ON CONTACT LINGUISTICS

Keynote speakers:
Jouko Lindstedt (University of Helsinki)
Salikoko S. Mufwene (The University of Chicago)
Aleksandr Rusakov (University of St. Petersburg & Russian Academy of Sciences)

NEW: WORKSHOP ON SLAVIC LINGUISTICS & THE WIDER CURRICULUM:
Led by Johanna Nichols (University of California, Berkeley)

{see below for more information}

MAIN SESSION:

We invite papers on all topics in Slavic linguistics, regardless of theoretical orientation.

WORKSHOP ON CONTACT LINGUISTICS:

We invite paper proposals on all aspects of contact and Slavic, diachronic and synchronic, including such topics as contact and the development of the Slavic languages, contact between different Slavic languages, and contact between Slavic and non-Slavic languages.

WORKSHOP ON SLAVIC LINGUISTICS & THE WIDER CURRICULUM:
Led by Johanna Nichols (University of California, Berkeley)

Deadline for abstracts: 14 September 2010 Notification: 1 October 2010
Slavic linguistics programs compete against each other for graduate students, but when it comes to undergraduate enrollments we are allies working to expand and strengthen the Slavic field and the position of linguistics in it. Slavic linguistics is a small but important field that does not need to produce large numbers of specialists but does need to reach out to non-specialists, attract more minors and double majors, and demonstrate to university administrators and our non-linguist colleagues its importance in the broader curriculum and in the task of helping form an enlightened citizenry.  This workshop is designed to share experiences and raise the visibility of  successful undergraduate elective and interdisciplinary content courses (i.e. courses other than regular language courses) that Slavic linguists teach and other Slavic linguists can profitably emulate.  We invite papers and presentations about such courses and related curricular matters.

We view this as a real workshop which will give us the opportunity to come together and discuss the role of Slavic linguistics today.

Speakers who are presenting in the main session or the contact workshop are invited to participate in the Slavic Linguistics & Curriculum workshop as well.

From the organizers:
Victor Friedman
Yaroslav Gorbachov
Lenore Grenoble

http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/sls2010/

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences, CEERES Events/News
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Slavic Colloquium: “Areas of Deformation: Dziga Vertov, Boris Pil’niak and the Archaeology of Soviet Modernism,” Michael Kunichika, May 24

“Areas of Deformation: Dziga Vertov, Boris Pil’niak and the Archaeology of Soviet Modernism”

By Michael Kunichika (NYU)

Time: 4:30pm, Monday, May 24.

Location: Foster 305 (1130 E. 59th Street)

Reception to follow.

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Slavic Colloquium: “Schulz avec Benjamin: the Mythical versus the Messianic,” Adam Lipszyc, May 17

Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Department of Jewish Studies

“Schulz avec Benjamin: the Mythical versus the Messianic,” by Adam Lipszyc (Warsaw University)

Time: 4:30pm, Monday, May 17
Location: Foster 103 (1130 E. 59th Street)

Reception to follow.

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Slavic Colloquium: “An Entangled History of Russian and British Ideological Construction of Empire in the Early 20th Century,” Alexander Semyonov, May 10

“An Entangled History of Russian and British Ideological Construction of Empire in the Early 20th Century”

Alexander M. Semyonov

Time: 4:30pm, Monday, May 10
Location: Foster 103 (1130 E. 59th Street)

Those needing assistance should contact Tracy L. Davis at slavic-department@uchicago.edu

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Slavic Colloquium: “Evgenii Cherviakov and The Poetics of Early Soviet Cinema,” Petr Bagrov, April 27

Slavic Colloquium: “Evgenii Cherviakov and The Poetics of Early Soviet Cinema”

Petr Bagrov

Time: Tuesday, April 27 4:30pm
Location: Cobb 310 (5811 S. Ellis Ave)

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Slavic Colloquium: “Family, Friends and Countrymen: Constructing Communities in Thaw Literature,” Kathryn Duda, April 19

Slavic Colloquium

“Family, Friends and Countrymen: Constructing Communities in Thaw Literature”

Kathryn Duda

Time: 4:30pm, Monday, April 19

Location: Foster 103 (1130 E. 59th Street)

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CEERES/Slavic Colloquium: “Toyen’s Realism,” Malynne Sternstein, April 5

CEERES and Slavic Colloquium invite you to hear Malynne Sternstein (University of Chicago) present “Toyen’s Realism.”

From Prof. Sternstein’s abstract:

The talk will explore Toyen’s anti-war work and make a claim for a full civic engagement in Czech surrealism that was absent in the French version.  The claim involves a new articulation of what “realism” might be in “surrealism”, the “realismus” in Czech “nadrealismus” and jump off the point of the prefix “nad” as opposed to “sur” in the French.  I would also look closely at Toyen’s narrative silence as a bid for plastic vociferation, a clamor beyond the (closed) dialectic that so many advocates—and critics—of surrealism have seen regnant.  This beyond to the surrealist dialectic I see at work in Toyen’s wartime art is for me recognizable as a return of the repressed of realism or, pace Debord, a “détournement” of surrealism in realism.

Time: 4:30pm, April 5.
Location: Foster 106 (1130 E. 59th Street)

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