Blog Archives

Film: The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnaussus (2009), Debartolo Performing Arts Center, University of Notre Dame, March 31

THU MAR 31, 2011 • 7:00PM – 9:30PM
BROWNING CINEMA, DEBARTOLO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

A fantastical morality tale, set in present-day, the Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus is the story of a travelling show where members of the audience get an irresistible opportunity to choose between light and joy or darkness and gloom. Cursed with a dark secret, the Doctor made a deal with the devil centuries ago for immortality. Upon meeting his one true love, he made another deal with devil trading his immortality for youth on the condition that when his daughter reaches her sixteenth birthday, she would become the property of the devil.

In a captivating, explosive and wonderfully imaginative race against time, Dr. Parnassus must fight to save his daughter in a never-ending landscape of surreal obstacles and undo the mistakes of his past once and for all.

A guest speaker (TBA) will introduce the film.

View the Trailer

Purchase Tickets Online or call 574-631-2800
$6, $5 faculty/staff, $4 senior citizens, and $3 all students
FREE tickets are available at the institute for faculty fellows and minors in the European Studies program.

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Film: Karamazovi (2008), Debartolo Performing Arts Center, University of Notre Dame, April 14

THU APR 14, 2011 • 7:00PM – 9:30PM
BROWNING CINEMA, DEBARTOLO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Director Petr Zelenka will be present to introduce the film.
An Interview with Petr Zelenka

Petr Zelenka

Petr Zelenka (born August 21, 1967 in Prague, Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic) is an award-winning Czech playwright and director of theatre and film. His films have been recognized at international festivals in Moscow and Rotterdam. His filmKaramazovi (The Brothers Karamazov) was the Czech Republic’s official Oscar submission for Best Foreign Language Film in 2008.

The Brothers Karamazov

View the Trailer

A theatre company from Prague arrives in Krakow to present a stage adaptation of Dostoevsky’s novel “The Brothers Karamazov” at the city’s alternative drama festival; the production is to be staged in an unusual venue – the local steelworks. As rehearsals get under way, we follow not only the emotional story examining issues of faith, immortality and the salvation of the human soul, but also the relationships within the acting troupe itself, which strangely reflect Dostoevsky’s “great” themes. The stage drama is transferred to the real world when a tragedy occurs during rehearsal involving one of the spectators.

Purchase Tickets Online or call 574-631-2800
$6, $5 faculty/staff, $4 senior citizens, and $3 all students
FREE tickets are available at the institute for faculty fellows and minors in the European Studies program.

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Caryl Emerson Lectures at Notre Dame, February 10-12

CARYL EMERSON

Provost’s Distinguished Woman Lecturer

On the campus of the University of Notre Dame, February 10-12, 2010

Wednesday, February 10
1:55-2:45 pm – Brothers Karamazov the Opera: Turning a “polyphonic” novel into redemptive religious art
McKenna Hall (Room 210-214)
4:00 pm – Russian Classics on the Stalinist Stage: The Case of Boris Godunov, 1936 (Pushkin, Meyerhold, Prokofiev)
McKenna Hall (Room 210-214)

Thursday, February 11
12:30 pm – The State of the Humanities: A Discussion
O’Shaughnessy Hall (Room 339)
5:00 pm – Tolstoy and Shakespeare (Centennial comments on a very famous feud, with a sideways glance at Bernard Shaw)
McKenna Hall Auditorium, reception to follow

Friday, February 12
12:50-2:45 pm – Tools for Teaching the Post-Boom Bakhtin: A Workshop and Practicum
O’Shaughnessy Hall (Room 118)

Featuring:

CARYL EMERSON

A. Watson Armour III University Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Princeton University

Caryl Emerson chairs the Slavic Department at Princeton University with a co-appointment in Comparative Literature. A translator and critic of Mikhail Bakhtin, she has also published widely on nineteenth-century Russian literature (Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy), on the history and relevance of literary criticism (here and in the Slavic world), and on Russian opera and vocal music. Recent publications include The Cambridge Introduction to Russian Literature (2008) and, coauthored with Chester Dunning, The Uncensored Boris Godunov (2006). Current research interests center around archival reconstructions of lost theater repertory of the Stalinist era—dramatic productions destined for (but disappeared from) the Moscow stage in the 1930s: Boris Godunov, Evgenii Onegin, and Egyptian Nights, all with Prokofiev’s incidental music. Professor Emerson is the recipient of a 2009-10 Guggenheim fellowship for work on the Russian modernist Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, and is the current president of the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL).

Sponsored by The Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, College of Art and Letters: Provost’s Distinguished Women’s Lecturer Program with additional generous support from the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, the Ph.D. in Literature Program, and the Departments of German and Russian Languages and Literatures, Film, Television, and Theatre, English, and Romance Languages and Literatures.

Site: http://germanandrussian.nd.edu/russian/calendar/

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