Blog Archives

Post-Bac Research Positions (Linguistics), University of Maryland, Deadline: April 20

The Department of Linguistics at the University of Maryland, College Park, is looking to fill up to three full-time positions for post-baccalaureate researchers. Starting date for all positions is summer or fall 2010. Salary is competitive, with benefits included. The positions would be ideal for individuals with a BA degree who are interested in gaining significant research experience in a very active lab as preparation for a research career. Applicants must be US or Canadian citizens or permanent residents, and should have completed a BA or BS degree by the time of appointment. Previous experience in linguistics is required, and relevant research experience is preferred.

Applicants may request to be considered for all positions. Review of applications for all positions will begin immediately, and will continue until the positions are filled. For best consideration, completed applications should be received by April 20th.

Position #1: Research Assistant in Psycholinguistics/Cognitive Neuroscience

This person will take a leading role in research projects in psycholinguistics and cognitive neuroscience of language. The person will be involved in all aspects of the design, testing and analysis of studies of language comprehension in adults, using behavioral and neuroscientific techniques, including ERP and MEG brain recordings (training provided). The person will also play a key role in the management of an active lab group and will contribute to Maryland’s IGERT training program in “Biological and Computational Foundations of Language Diversity”. Previous experience in linguistics and/or psycholinguistics is preferred. The ability to interact comfortably with a wide variety of people (and machines) is a distinct advantage. The position is for a one year initial appointment, with the possibility of extension beyond that time. For more information contact Dr Colin Phillips, colin@umd.edu, (301) 405-3082. http://www.ling.umd.edu/colin

Positions #2-#3: Baggett Research Fellowships 2010-2011

One-year Baggett Fellowships are full-time positions intended for individuals with a BA or BS degree who are interested in gaining significant research experience in an active interdisciplinary environment before pursuing graduate study in some area of linguistics or cognitive science. One or two fellowship positions are available for the 2010-2011 year. Salary is competitive, with benefits included.

Applicants for all positions should submit a cover letter (outlining relevant background and interests, including potential faculty mentors), a current CV, and the names and contact information for 3 potential referees (letters are not needed as part of the initial application), and a writing sample. Fuller details athttp://www.ling.umd.edu/baggett. All application materials should be submitted electronically to Jeff Lidz (jlidz@umd.edu). NOTE: Put “Baggett Fellowship” in the subject line. Prospective fellows should fel free to send a preliminary letter of interest to Dr Lidz or Dr Phillips.
=======================================================================
The Cognitive Neuroscience of Language Lab is a well-integrated community of over 40 faculty, students and research staff, engaged in research on a wide variety of areas of language, ranging from acoustics to semantics, in children and adults, normal and disordered populations, and covering around 10 languages. The lab has facilities for behavioral testing of infants, children and adults, two eye-tracking labs, an ERP lab and a whole-head MEG facility. The lab is affiliated with the Department of Linguistics and with the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science Program.

http://www.ling.umd.edu/

The University of Maryland is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunities Title IX employer. Women and minority candidates are especially encouraged to apply.

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Postdoctoral Position in South Slavonic Sociolinguistics, University of Helsinki, Deadline: April 30

The Department of Modern Languages of the University of Helsinki is offering a position for a

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER IN SOUTH SLAVONIC SOCIOLINGUISTICS

for a fixed term from 1 August 2010 to 31 July 2012.

The aim of the postdoctoral researcher position is to encourage a talented, recently graduated doctoral degree holder to seek further qualifications and become an independent professional researcher in South Slavonic sociolinguistics, dialectology, and the sociology of language. The duties of the postdoctoral researcher include research according to the research plan submitted by the applicant, participation in the work of the research project and in the supervision of theses in the field, and teaching related to the appointee s specialisation. Teaching duties account for no more than 5% of the appointee s working hours.

According to the Regulations of the University of Helsinki, the appointee must hold a doctoral degree and have the ability to conduct independent scientific work as well as the teaching skills required by the position.

When assessing the qualifications of each candidate, attention will be paid to the quality of the published studies in South Slavonic linguistics, especially sociolinguistic and dialectology, and the quality of the research plan submitted.

According to the Government Decree on Universities, postdoctoral researchers are required to be competent in the language in which they provide instruction, in other words, Finnish or Swedish. They must have at least satisfactory oral and written skills in both languages. Foreign citizens, non-native Finnish citizens, or citizens who have not been educated in Finnish or Swedish, may be exempted from this requirement without a separate application. To successfully attend to the duties of the position, the appointee must also have good English skills.

The salary will be based on level 5 of the demands level chart for teaching and research personnel in the salary system of Finnish universities. In addition, the appointee will be paid a salary component based on personal work performance. The salary range will be between 2,636 and 3,857 euros per month depending on the qualifications and previous experience of the appointee.

To apply, please send a letter describing your interests (also with respect to this particular position) and qualifications, a CV (including a publication list), a two-year research plan, and contact information for two references (who have agreed to provide a letter of reference) to the Department of Modern Languages, Professor Jouko Lindstedt, P.O. Box 24 (Unioninkatu 40 B), FI 00014 University of Helsinki. Applications can also be submitted by e-mail to the address nykykielet-toimisto@helsinki.fi. The deadline for applications is 30 April 2010 at 15:45 hours local Helsinki time.

Additional information is available from Professor Jouko Lindstedt, jouko.lindstedt@helsinki.fi.

Helsinki, 22 March 2010
University of Helsinki Central Administration

www.helsinki.fi/university

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Spring Quarter Course: Advanced Structure of Albanian

Advanced Structure of Albanian

LGLN 29800, LGLN 39800
EEUR / 20902, EEUR 30902

This course covers advance structures of Standard Albanian, provides practice in reading Standard Albanian, and introduces the student to reading Gheg.   

The goal of the course is to teach the advanced linguistic structures of Standard Albanian, to give practice reading Standard Albanian, and to provide an understanding of how to read and translate Gheg.

The course will begin where Albanian Language and Linguistics left off, thus the first few weeks will be review and study of Isa Zymberi’s Colloquial Albanian and Victor Friedman’s Albanian Grammar. This will be followed by instruction with Agim Morina’s Beginning to speak Geg. In addition, students will be required to do weekly assignments based on reading the BBC’s Albanian language webpage (BBCAlbanian.com), and read and partially translate/gloss an earlier Gheg article of their choice from the journal Revistë Shkencore e Instituti Pedogogjik Dyveçar të Shkodrës which is available in the Regenstein Library.

The class will meet twice a week during the Spring Quarter.

First Meeting Tuesday March 30, 2010 at noon in Foster Hall Room 408 (Slavic Lounge).

Suggested course meeting times, Tuesday and Thursdays noon-1:30 pm, but depending on your schedule we can arrange a different time.

For more information contact the course instructor, Kelly Lynne Maynard at

kellymaynard@uchicago.edu

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CEERES Event: “Sociolinguistic Implications of Writing One Language with Two Scripts,” Daniel Bunčić, April 12

April 12, 2010 (Monday).  Daniel Bunčić (University of Tübingen), “Sociolinguistic Implications of Writing One Language with Two Scripts.”  Franke Institute (in the Regenstein Library, 1100 E. 57th Street); 4:30pm

Paper Abstract: So far linguists have only sporadically reported about a phenomenon variously called digraphia, bigraphism, multiscriptality, multialphabetism etc., where one language is written with two (or more) scripts (or orthographies). Among the most frequently mentioned examples of this are Serbian (which is written in both Cyrillic and Latin letters), Hindi-Urdu (Devanagari and Arabic), Chinese (Hanzi and Pinyin), Japanese (Kanji, Hiragana, Katakana and sometimes Latin letters), older German (blackletter and roman type) and Old Norse (runes and Latin alphabet), but dozens more can be found in the literature. However, at a second glance all these sociolinguistic situations are so different that they can hardly be subsumed under a single cover term. Therefore I will try to offer instruments for a more detailed classification, drawing analogies to such well-known concepts as diglossia, bilingualism and pluricentric languages. The resulting typology will be exemplified, apart from the cases mentioned above, primarily with Slavic material (coming not only from former Yugoslavia but also from Belarus, 18th/19th-century Russia, early modern Poland and Bohemia as well as medieval Novgorod and Bulgaria).

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies, the Department of Lingusitics, and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events
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New Congnitive and Corpus Linguistics Course, University of Tromsø (Norway), Deadline: May 1

Cognitive and Corpus Linguistics: Invitation to HIF 3030, an MA-Level course
taught in Fall 2010 at the University of Tromsø

See our website: http://hum.uit.no/lajanda/MAclasses/Cognitve&CorpusLx.html

Students from all countries are encouraged to register.

There are no prerequisites, no language requirements, and no tuition costs.

Course Description: This state-of-the-art course will engage you in the
major concepts of Cognitive Linguistics through the works of outstanding
linguists of the past three decades (Lakoff, Langacker, Geeraerts, Talmy,
Tuggy, etc.). At the same time you will be coached in basic techniques for
collecting and analyzing authentic language data using digital corpora and
accessible statistical software. You will select you own original research
project on the language and phenomenon of your choice, which you will carry
out under the guidance of a team of linguists. This course gives you
hands-on experience in developing publishable results while working directly
with leading experts in the field.

Location: The intellectual experience of a semester in Tromsø is
complemented by the exotic beauty of the location, surrounded by spectacular
mountains and sea. Tromsø, also know as the “Paris of the North”, is
renowned as the best place to view the Aurora Borealis.

Other Courses Available: Concurrently with Cognitive and Corpus Linguistics
(HIF 3030), students are welcome to choose among a wide range of courses
offered in English at the University of Tromsø in topics including
Indigenous Studies, Formal Linguistics, Anthropology, History, and various
languages.

Funding: The University of Tromsø charges no tuition fees. The only costs
associated with this opportunity are travel and living expenses. Students
from EU countries may be eligible for Erasmus funding and students from the
circumpolar region (Northern Russia, Alaska, Finland, Sweden, Greenland) may
be eligible for North-to-North funding.

Deadlines and how to register: The deadline for registering is May 1, 2010.
You can find information on how to register at this link:
http://www2.uit.no/www/inenglish/prospectivestudents/admission. Additional
information is available on our website in the document łInformation for
International Students˛.

Instructors in the course/Members of our research group:
Laura A. Janda, Tore Nesset, Olga Lyashevskaya, Svetlana Sokolova, Julia
Kuznetsova

Contact us: laura.janda@uit.no; tore.nesset@uit.no

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Workshop on Language Variation and Change: “The Origin of Accentlessness,” Jay Jasanoff (Harvard), February 26

Workshop on Language Variation and Change
Sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies
This Friday we present the 4th talk of Winter Quarter for the Language Variation and Change Workshop at the University of Chicago.  We are very excited to announce :
JAY JASANOFF
Diebold Professor of Indo-European Linguistics and Philology
Department of Linguistics, Harvard University
Friday, February 26th at 4 pm, in Harper 103 (1116 E. 59th Street)
*this is 30 minutes later than our usual time*
The Origin of Accentlessness, or Balto-Slavic Mobility without Tears

*Stick around for a reception after the talk to eat, drink, and chat with Jay and the other workshop attendees.*
Start planning now for the last of Winter quarter’s LVC presentations:
Friday, March 12th at 3:30 pm: April Grotberg (University of Chicago) “The development and distribution of Coptic case morphology”
See details on our website here: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/lvc/
———-
This talk is part of a year-long workshop on Language Variation and Change, with a focus on the motivations and consequences of language change from diverse perspectives (incl. linguistic, historical, social, cognitive, and computational). Meetings are held bi-weekly on Fridays.  Each meeting features a presentation, followed by discussion.
We have a number of exciting speakers lined up for this series, both local and from abroad. The current list and meeting schedule, together with further information about the workshop, can be found at: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/lvc/
If you are interested in presenting recent research as part of this series, please email one of us (listed below). Graduate students of any department are especially invited!
Any persons with a disability who believe they might need assistance in attending the workshops are asked to contact Alice Lemieux in advance at lemieux@uchicago.edu.
Posted in: University of Chicago Events
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“Russian Case Morphology and the Syntactic Categories,” David Pesetsky (MIT), March 4

David Pesetsky, MIT
“Russian case morphology and the syntactic categories”
Thursday, March 4th, 10:30am
Place TBA

Abstract:

Sometimes it is the oddest facts that provide the best clues to
significant properties of language, because their very oddity limits
the space in which we are likely to search for possible explanations.
In  this talk, I argue that the strange behavior of  Russian nominal
phrases with paucal numerals (‘two’, ‘three’ and ‘four’) provide clues
of just this type concerning the syntactic side of morphological case.

When a nominal phrase like the Russian counterpart of ‘these last two
beautiful tables’ occupies a nominative environment, the pre-numeral
demonstrative and adjective (‘these last’) bear nominative plural
morphology, and the numeral itself is nominative. The post-numeral
adjective (‘beautfiul’), however, is often genitive plural; and the
noun (‘table’) is genitive singular — a situation that the
illustrious Russian grammarian Peshkovsky (1956) characterized as “a
typical example of the degree to which grammatical and logical
thinking may diverge”.

I suggest that the behavior of these phrases is actually entirely
logical — once one adopts a particular structural analysis of the
Russian DP. and a particular view of the nature of case morphology.
Developing ideas by Richards (2007), I propose that Russian is a
covert case-stacking language in which the realization of out case
morphemes suppresses the pronunciation of inner morphemes — with this
process restricted, however, by the phonological freezing effect of
phase spell-out (Chomsky 1995; 2001).  The case affixes themselves —
traditionally classified using case-specific sui generis terminology
(nominative, genitive, etc.) — are actually instantiations of  the
various syntactic categories: N, P and V.  The interaction of this
proposal with the theory of phases and spellout raises at least the
possibility that there is no special theory of morphological case.

Posted in: University of Chicago Events
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Call for Proposals: The Fifth Annual Meeting of the Slavic Linguistics Society, Deadline: April 30

Call for Proposals:

The Fifth Annual Meeting of the Slavic Linguistics Society
University of Chicago
29-31 October 2010
http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/sls2010/

The purpose of the Slavic Linguistic Society is to create a community of students and scholars interested in Slavic linguistics in its broadest sense, that is, the systematic and scholarly study of the Slavic languages and the contacts of Slavic with non-Slavic languages. The Society aspires to be as open and inclusive as possible; no school, framework, approach, or theory is presupposed, nor is there any restriction in terms of geography, academic affiliation or status.

Papers dealing with any aspect of Slavic linguistics as understood above and within any framework are appropriate including sociolinguistics, computational linguistics, language acquisition, etc.. The only restriction is that all papers should address an issue pertaining to Slavic linguistics as defined above. We encourage everyone to participate and ask you to share this announcement with as many colleagues and students as possible. In view of the openness of our orientation, all papers are expected to be readily intelligible to other scholars, regardless of theoretical orientation.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES:
-500 word maximum
-2 page maximum (the second page may be used for tables, figures and references)
-Word doc or PDF format
-Place the title at the top of the first page; do not include your name, institution, or any identifying information on the abstract

SUBMISSION:
http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/sls2010/

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: 30 April 2010
NOTIFICATION: 1 JUNE 2010

We are also pleased to announce a special workshop on contact linguistics & Slavic languages in connection with the conference:

***WORKSHOP IN CONTACT LINGUISTICS:

INVITED SPEAKERS:
Jouko Lindstedt (Professor of Slavonic Philology, Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki)
and
Aleksandr Rusakov (Professor, Department of General Linguistics, University of St. Petersburg & Researcher in Linguistics, Russian Academy of Sciences)

We invite paper proposals on all aspects of contact and Slavic, diachronic and synchronic, including such topics as
contact and the development of the Slavic languages, contact between different Slavic languages, and contact between Slavic and non-Slavic languages. [Note: if you have already submitted an abstract and wish to have it considered for the workshop, please send a message to us at slaviclinguisticsociety2010@gmail.com]

DESCRIPTION:

For millennia, speakers of Slavic languages have expanded over a considerable territory, coming into contact with speakers of other languages, both Slavic and non-Slavic. These contacts have left their imprint on the Slavic languages and have played important roles in their differentiation over time. By the same token, many of the Slavic languages have had a significant impact on the other languages they have come in contact with. The introduction of writing in the late first millennium brought yet another vehicle for contact influences, in particular from Greek in the early period, but continuing as a vehicle for change with the development of the literary traditions of the different Slavic languages.
The range and extent of contact-induced phenomena vary according to time and language and are often difficult to assess. Cases of lexical borrowing are generally clear, in terms of what is the source and what is the target, but in other areas of potential contact-induced change, it can be difficult if not impossible, to prove without question that a given phenomenon or feature is the result of contact and not independent innovation or shared inheritance. This is perhaps
particularly true for the impact of one Slavic variety upon the other, where the genetic and typological properties of
both are extremely close to one another. Additional ambiguities are introduced by the fact that some important contact phenomena occurred during the prehistoric period.***

The organizing committee:
Victor Friedman
Yaroslav Gorbachov
Lenore Grenoble

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences, University of Chicago Events
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Russian Speakers Needed for Web-based Experimental Study

A message to Russian speakers:

Dear fellow Slavic linguists,

I am conducting a study on how native speakers of Russian interpret certain types of Russian sentences in the context of preceding stories, with both visual and auditory sentence presentation. The study is entirely web-based, on survey gizmo, and can be taken on any computer that has internet access (it has to be fairly fast/good-quality internet access, because otherwise the survey pages will take too long to download) and has audio-capability (since part of the study involves listening to audio-files). This study is approved by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Internal Review Board.   I am in great need of native Russian-speaking participants; all native speakers of Russian qualify as long as they (1) currently live in Russia; or (2) currently live outside of Russia, but left Russia as adults (age 18 or older).   For study participants who are local (in Illinois) we pay $10 for study participation. For non-local participants, unfortunately we cannot provide compensation, due to the logistical difficulties of money transfer.   Below, please find the official recruitment emails. If you are interested in participating in this study, please email me at tionin@illinois.edu . I would also appreciate it if you could forward this announcement to any Russian-speaking friends/relatives/colleagues.

Thank you in advance!

Tania Ionin

Tania Ionin
Assistant Professor of Linguistics
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
FLB 4080
707 S. Mathews Ave.
Urbana, IL 61801
tionin@illinois.edu
https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/tionin/www/

*********

Уважаемые носители русского языка,

Приглашаем Вас принять участие в экспериментальном исследовании на предмет того, как говорящие на русском языке интерпретируют предложения на русском в контексте. Мы ищем волонтеров, для которых русский язык является родным, и которые жили в России до совершеннолетия и переехали в США (или в другую, не русскоговорящую страну) в возрасте 18 лет или старше.

Если вы подходите этим требованиям или считаете, что могли бы принять участие в данном исследовании, мы просим Вас связаться с нами по электронной почте по следующим адресам: tionin@illinois.edu или luchkin1@illinois.edu .

Участие в данном исследовании является строго добровольным, и может быть прервано в любое время.  Если Вы примете решение стать участником, Вам будет предложено заполнить короткую анкету на компьютере о Вашем языковом профиле. Затем Вам будет предложено выполнить тест на русском языке состоящий из двух частей. В этом тесте Вам будет нужно оценить ряд предложений на русском языке с учетом данного контекста. Ожидается, что на выполнение всего теста  Вам потребуется около часа. Все задания предлагаются в электронном варианте и  выполняются на любом компьютере, имеющим доступ в Интернет (по адресу, который мы сообщим Вам) и проигрывающем аудио файлы (для ряда вопросов, Вам потребуется прослушать короткие записи, сопровождающие тестовые задания).

Участие в данном исследовании не предполагает получение какой-либо материальной (или иной) компенсации.

Мы гарантируем полную конфиденциальность всей полученной от Вас информации: Ваши данные, так же как и Ваш тест будут храниться в анонимной форме. По любым вопросам об этом исследовании и участии в нём, пожалуйста, обращайтесь к нам.

Tania Ionin и Татьяна Лучкина.

*********

(For Russian speakers in Illinois)

Уважаемые носители русского языка,

Приглашаем Вас принять участие в экспериментальном исследовании на предмет того, как говорящие на русском языке интерпретируют предложения на русском в контексте. Мы ищем волонтеров, для которых русский язык является родным, и которые жили в России до совершеннолетия и переехали в США (или в другую, не русскоговорящую страну) в возрасте 18 лет или старше. Если вы подходите этим требованиям или считаете, что могли бы принять участие в данном исследовании, мы просим Вас связаться с нами по электронной почте по следующим адресам: tionin@illinois.edu или luchkin1@illinois.edu.

Участие в данном исследовании является строго добровольным, и может быть прервано в любое время.  Если Вы примете решение стать участником, Вам будет предложено заполнить короткую анкету на компьютере о Вашем языковом профиле. Затем Вам будет предложено выполнить тест на русском языке состоящий из двух частей. В этом тесте Вам будет нужно оценить ряд предложений на русском языке с учетом данного контекста. Ожидается, что на выполнение всего теста  Вам потребуется около часа. Все задания предлагаются в электронном варианте и  выполняются на компьютере. Тестирование будет проходить в психолингвистической лаборатории в здании факультета иностранных языков на территории UIUC, или в другом месте, удобном для Вас, в удобное для Вас время. По завершении тестирования, Вам будет выплачена компенсация в размере $ 10 за Ваше участие.

Мы гарантируем полную конфиденциальность всей полученной от Вас информации: Ваши данные, так же как и Ваш тест будут храниться в анонимной форме. По любым вопросам об этом исследовании и участии в нём, пожалуйста, обращайтесь к нам.

Tania Ionin и Татьяна Лучкина.

Posted in: Job Postings
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Call for Papers: Tenth Annual Conference of the Slavic Linguistics Association, April 16

The Department of Slavic Languages
and
the Department of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences
at Brown University present

THE TENTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF
THE SLAVIC COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS ASSOCIATION (SCLC-2010)
October 9-11, 2010

The Slavic Cognitive Linguistics Association (SCLA) announces the Call for Papers for the 2010 annual conference. The conference will be held on the campus of Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island) on Saturday, October 9 through Monday, October 11, 2010.

SCLC-2010 Keynote Speakers

Eugene Charniak
Brown University

Adele E. Goldberg
Princeton University

Ronald W. Langacker
University of California, San Diego

CALL FOR PAPERS
Abstracts are invited for presentations addressing issues of significance for cognitive linguistics with some bearing on data from the Slavic languages. As long as there is a cognitive orientation, papers may be on synchronic or diachronic topics in any of the traditional areas of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse analysis, or sociolinguistics. In addition to the Slavic Languages, relevant papers on other languages of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are also acceptable.

Abstracts may be submitted up until the deadline of April 16, 2010 to Steven Clancy <sclancy@uchicago.edu>. Abstracts should be approximately 500 words, but strict word limits are not required. Notification of acceptance will be provided by May 31, 2010.

Most presentations at SCLC are given in English, but may be in the native (Slavic) language of the presenter. However, if the presentation is not to be made in English we ask that you provide an abstract in English in addition to an abstract in any other SCLA language.

MAIN SESSIONS (Saturday, Sunday, and Monday)
Each presentation for the main sessions will be given 20 minutes and will be followed by a 10-minute discussion period.

PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE
Saturday, October 9: conference panels beginning in the morning and continue throughout the day, evening reception, keynote address, and conference dinner
Sunday, October 10: main sessions and keynote address throughout the day, lunch and dinner
Monday, October 11: main sessions and keynote address with conclusion by noon

FURTHER INFORMATION
Information on transportation, accommodations, and the conference venue will be forthcoming. Please see the conference website for further information.
http://languages.uchicago.edu/scla

Brown University is located in Providence, Rhode Island and is accessible from Boston Logan International Airport (BOS, 55 miles away) or T.F. Green Airport (PVD) in Providence.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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