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Workshop on the Sociolinguistics of Language Endangerment, Linguistic Society of America 2011 Summer Institute, July 30-31

Workshop on the Sociolinguistics of Language Endangerment

Description

This workshop will discuss and analyze the major sociolinguistic factors in the process of language endangerment. This will take the form of presentations on particular communities from an insider and outsider perspective, as well as overview presentations on specific types of endangerment factors. We will also attempt to provide some examples of successful language maintenance and revitalization strategies.

The workshop is sponsored by the Comité International Permanent des Linguistes and is organized by the CIPL Professor in the 2011 LSA Summer Institute, David Bradley. The workshop will comprise invited presentations and a summary panel discussion session on Saturday July 30. The planned list of invited speakers includes David Bradley, La Trobe U; James Cowell, U of Colorado; Pierpaolo diCarlo, SUNY Buffalo; Lise Dobrin, U of Virginia; Arienne Dwyer, U of Kansas; Lenore Grenoble, U of Chicago; Barbra Meek, U of Michigan; and Ofelia Zepeda, U of Arizona. The examples will be drawn primarily from the Americas, Asia, the Pacific and Africa.

Abstracts are now invited for presentations on Sunday July 31, either in 15-minute talks or in poster form. These should be sent by March 31, 2011 to David Bradley and speakers will be advised by May 15, 2011 whether their presentations have been accepted.

Organizers

  • David Bradley, d DOT bradley AT latrobe DOT edu DOT au

 

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Conference: 47th Annual Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society, April 7-9, Registration Deadline March 31

CLS 47 Preliminary Schedule

Pre-registration open! (until March 31)

Main Session

Sharon Inkelas, University of California, Berkeley
Angelika Kratzer, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Norvin Richards, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Experimental Methods in Linguistic Research

Yosef Grodzinsky, McGill University
Keith Johnson, University of California, Berkeley
Colin Phillips, University of Maryland

Each Spring scholars with diverse backgrounds and theoretical perspectives gather for three days of talks and discussion, followed by our annual CLS banquet. The conference is divided into a Main Session, comprised of talks on a broad range of linguistic issues, and one or more Parasessions, comprised of talks on more particular issues within a sub-field of the discipline.

The 47th annual meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society will be held April 7-9, 2011 in the Ida Noyes Hall at the University of Chicago. The conference will include a general session as well as a parasession devoted to Experimental Methods in Linguistic Research.

Call for papers

Pre-registration

Travel information

Past meetings

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CEERES Friends: Department of Linguistics

Department of Linguistics

Founded in the mid-1930’s, the Department of Linguistics at the University of Chicago is the oldest linguistics department in the United States. It is theory-oriented with a deep empirical interest in languages. One of its outstanding characteristics is its commitment to a wide range of approaches to the study of language. Interdisciplinary, interdepartmental study is encouraged, and students regularly work with faculty in several other departments. Students are expected to become active researchers as soon as possible after their arrival here. Many students come with strong undergraduate training in linguistics, or with a Master’s degree; others come with strong training in fields such as philosophy, mathematics, or a particular language or language group. The faculty are involved in synchronic and diachronic research on languages from around the world. These varied interests are reflected in the topics of the dissertations that have been written in the Department. The undergraduate program in linguistics is designed to provide a solid, integrated introduction to the scientific study of language through coursework in the core subdisciplines of linguistics, as well as to ensure that the student has a language background sufficient to provide a complement to the theoretical parts of the program and for an understanding of the complexities of human language. This program provides students with a general expertise in the field and prepares them for productive advanced study in linguistics.


Check out events happening at the Department of Linguistics.
Related workshops.
And a Blog in LINGuistics — BLING.

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Workshop: Empirical Methods in Cognitive Linguistics 5.2 (EMCL-5.2), University of Chicago, Application Deadline March 15

Empirical Methods in Cognitive Linguistics 5.2

(EMCL-5.2)

The Integration of Corpus and Experimental Methods

Monday-Saturday, June 13-18, 2011

at the University of Chicago

The Center for the Study of Languages (CSL)
together with
The Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies (CEERES),
at the University of Chicago

present

Empirical Methods in Cognitive Linguistics 5.2 (EMCL-5.2) — Chicago
The Integration of Corpus and Experimental Methods

Monday-Saturday, June 13-18, 2011, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois USA

Website: http://languages.uchicago.edu/emcl5-2

Application Deadline: March 15, 2011
PDF Flier available for download here

Call for Participation

We invite applications to the next workshop on Empirical Methods in Cognitive Linguistics – EMCL 5.2 – to be held at the University of Chicago (Chicago, IL), June 13-18, 2011.

The EMCL workshop series aims to encourage dialogue between language researchers who routinely employ different methodologies. This dialogue is initiated within an environment where novices and specialists combine their skills to develop a research project together. For EMCL 5.2, we will focus on the integration of corpus and experimental methods in language research.

Intended audience: Early career language researchers (i.e., graduate students, postdocs, junior faculty, etc.) grounded in theoretical issues surrounding cognitive linguistics, cognitive science, embodiment, and/or situated cognition. No prior training with corpus or experimental methods is necessary.

Format: Selected students (maximum 8 per group, for a total of 24) will be invited to join one of the 3 hands-on mini-labs at the workshop. Each group will be led by two researchers who will work cooperatively – one specializing in corpus methods, and one in experimental methods. As a group, each mini-lab will walk through the process of deciding on a research question; developing empirically testable hypotheses and designing the means to test those hypotheses; collecting, analyzing, and interpreting the data; and presenting their findings before an audience. The workshop will end with a mini-conference in which each group will have the opportunity to present their study and participate in a general discussion.

Workshop faculty

Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Michele Feist
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Research interests: lexical semantics; spatial and motion language; acquisition of semantics; linguistic typology; language and thought
Dagmar Divjak
University of Sheffield
Research interests: lexical semantics, usage-based cognitive linguistics, the role of frequency, corpus methods, grammar-lexis interface, near-synonyms, aspect and modality, language acquisition
Laura Carlson
University of Notre Dame
Research interests: spatial language; spatial reference frames; how we remember and use landmarks; why we get lost
Steven Clancy
University of Chicago
Research interests: cognitive linguistics; case semantics and verbal semantics; grammaticalization; historical linguistics; quantitative methods and corpus methods
Ben Bergen
University of California San Diego
Research interests: lexical and constructional meaning processing; figurative language comprehension; embodiment in models of language use
Mark Davies
Brigham Young University
Research interests: corpus design, creation, and use; historical change (especially syntax); genre-based variation (especially syntax), frequency and collocational data; English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Accommodations

Accommodations are available within easy walking distance of the university; prices range from $60+ per night for a single, or $80+ per night for a double. Further information will be given to accepted participants after notification of acceptance to the workshop.

Participation fee: $300.00

Fees will cover the costs of organization and faculty travel and accommodations and will also cover most meals for participants during the workshop.

Application

To apply, please send the following:
1. A letter of application, maximum of two pages, describing
a. Your background and research interests
b. Your reasons for wanting to participate in EMCL 5.2
c. The research group you would like to work in and why
2. A copy of your curriculum vitae.

Send these materials to emcl5.2.chicago@gmail.com.
The application deadline is 15 March 2011. Accepted applicants will be notified on or before 1 May 2011.

**Please note: Participation is strictly limited to accepted applicants so as to preserve the pedagogical integrity of the workshop atmosphere.

* * *
We thank the following organizations for their generous support of EMCL 5.2

The Center for the Study of Languages
The Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies (CEERES)

EMCL 5.2 Organizing Committee:

Michele I. Feist, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Steven Clancy, University of Chicago

*Further Information*

Please contact Michele Feist <feist@louisiana.edu> or Steven Clancy <sclancy@uchicago.edu> if you have any questions or would like to receive further information about this workshop. A PDF flier is available for download here.

* EMCL-5.2 Fees *

The EMCL-5.2 participation fee is $300.00. Fees will cover the costs of organization and faculty travel and accommodations and will also cover most meals for participants during the workshop.

Meals and coffee breaks included in registration fees:

  • Monday: Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee Breaks, Dinner
  • Tuesday: Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee Breaks
  • Wednesday: Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee Breaks, Dinner
  • Thursday: Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee Breaks
  • Friday: Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee Breaks, Dinner
  • Saturday: Breakfast, Coffee Breaks

NOTE: Participants will be on their own for dinner on Tuesday and Thursday evenings.

Payment will be due after you have been notified of acceptance to the workshop. Please make checks payable to: The University of Chicago. Payments via credit/debit card cannot be accepted. Receipt of your application will be confirmed by e-mail.  If you have any questions about your application, please contact: Steven Clancy <sclancy@uchicago.edu>.

Please send checks for participation fees to:

Steven Clancy
Center for the Study of Languages
University of Chicago
1130 E. 59th St., Foster 406
Chicago, IL 60637

TRANSPORTATION AND ACCOMMODATIONS

GETTING THERE AND PARKING
The University of Chicago campus is located in Hyde Park south of downtown Chicago (map of Hyde Park). The Center for the Study of Languages can be found off the main quad of campus (map) between 57th and 59th Streets along Ellis Avenue.

Driving: Campus is accessible from the 57th Street exit off of Lake Shore Drive, or coming from I-90/94 at the Garfield Blvd exit.

Transit: The Garfield stops of the Red and Green line “L” trains, to the 55, x55 or 174 buses. Many buses run from downtown: 2, 4, 6, 173. The CTA (Chicago Transit Authority) website features a trip planner.

The Metra train leaves from the station at the intersection of Randolph and Michigan Avenues or Van Buren Street and Michigan Avenue. The train takes about 20 minutes to get to the 55th-56th-57th Street stop. Schedules can be found here. From the station stop, it is about a 15 minute walk to campus.

Taxi: Expect an average taxi ride from downtown to campus to cost approximately 25 dollars. Ride sharing is allowed in Chicago taxis.

Parking is permitted along most streets around The University of Chicago and Hyde Park. It is suggested that you leave extra time to park and walk depending on availability of parking spaces. There are parking lots in a few places as well. University of Chicago parking information is available here.

LODGING
The workshop has secured a block of 9 single dorm-style rooms and 1 shared room in McCormick Seminary Guest Housing ($60 per night for a single room; $90 per night for a double room). The address is 1400 E. 57th St. and phone is (773) 947-2950. Please refer to the “Empirical Methods in Cognitive Linguistics Workshop” when you make your reservation. Other options include dorm/hostel-style rooms at the International House. Both of these locations are within easy walking distance of the university. Participants are encouraged to make reservations promptly after notification of acceptance to the workshop.

If you would prefer to stay in Downton Chicago, you may find information on Downtown/Loop hotels that offer University of Chicago visitor discounts here andhere. There are also a limited number of Bed and Breakfasts in Hyde Park (COMING SOON). Information about other area accommodations may be found here (COMING SOON).

QUESTIONS?
Contact the conference organizers:

Steven Clancy
Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois USA

Michele I. Feist
Institute of Cognitive Science
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Lafayette, Louisiana USA

CONFERENCE WEBSITE
http://languages.uchicago.edu/emcl5-2

Last updated: 1 February 2011

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Workshop on Greek Linguistics, Department of Linguistics, March 4

Midwest Consortium on Greek Linguistics – Inaugural Meeting
Friday March 4, 2011
University of Chicago, Department of Linguistics

Program

Morning sessions: To be held at the Linguistics Lounge, Dept. of Linguistics

9:00-9:30
Nikos Vergis (UIUC): The rhetorics of shame: Language, women and stereotypes

9:30-10:00
Marina Terkourafi (UIUC): On the intonation/pragmatics interface: a prohibitive construction in Cypriot Greek

Break: 10-10:30

10:30-11:00
Anastasia Giannakidou (U Chicago), Despoina Papadopoulou (U Thessaloniki), and Melita Stavrou (U Thessaloniki): scope and epistemic judgment: evidence form Greek indefinites

11:00-11:30
Jason Merchant (U Chicago): A new argument for LF-copy? Evidence from ellipsis in the Greek NP

Lunch break: 11:30-1:00

Afternoon sessions: Harper 130

1:00-2:00
KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Ioanna Sitaridou (U Cambridge): The Last Greek Infinitive — Continuity, Contact, and Change in the Greek varieties of Pontus

2:00-2:30
Christopher Brown (OSU) and Brian D. Joseph (OSU): Greek of Southern Albania — Preliminary Observations

Break: 2:30-3:00

3:00-3:30
Eleni Staraki (U Chicago): Greek modals interacting with tense and aspect

3:30-4:00
Katerina Chatzopoulou (U Chicago): Negation selection in Ancient Greek: the latest news

4:00-4:30
Anastasia Smirnova (OSU): Linguistic encoding of motion events in Greek in comparison to other Balkan languages

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CfP: Workshop on the Sociolinguistics of Language Endangerment, Linguistic Society of America 2011 Summer Institute, Abstract Deadline March 31

WORKSHOP ON THE SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF LANGUAGE ENDANGERMENT SoLE-2

This workshop will discuss and analyze the major sociolinguistic factors in the process of language endangerment. This will take the form of presentations on particular communities from an insider and outsider perspective, as well as overview presentations on specific types of endangerment factors. We will also attempt to provide some examples of successful language maintenance and revitalization strategies.

SoLE-1 was held at the School of Oriental and African Studies on 27 June 2009, and selected papers from that conference appear in Anthropological Linguistics 52/2 (2010).

The SoLE-2 workshop is sponsored by the Comité International Permanent des Linguistes and is organized by the CIPL Professor in the 2011 LSA Summer Institute, David Bradley.

The workshop will comprise invited presentations and a summary panel discussion session on Saturday July 30. The planned list of invited speakers includes David Bradley, La Trobe U; James Cowell, U of Colorado; Pierpaolo diCarlo, SUNY Buffalo; Lise Dobrin, U of Virginia; Arienne Dwyer, U of Kansas; Lenore Grenoble, U of Chicago; Barbra Meek, U of Michigan; and Ofelia Zepeda, U of Arizona. The examples will be drawn primarily from the Americas, Asia, the Pacific and Africa, but talks on languages of other areas are also welcome.

Abstracts are now invited for presentations on Sunday July 31, either in 15-minute talks or in poster form. These should be sent by March 31, 2011 to David Bradley at d.bradley@latrobe.edu.au and speakers will be advised by May 15, 2011 whether their presentations have been accepted.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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CfP: The Slavic Cognitive Linguistics Association (SCLA) Conference, Abstract Deadline April 8

American University (Washington, DC, USA) and the Slavic Cognitive Linguistics Association present

THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF
THE SLAVIC COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS ASSOCIATION (SCLC-2011)
October 14-16, 2011
American University (Washington, DC, USA)

The Slavic Cognitive Linguistics Association (SCLA) announces the Call for Papers for the 2011 annual conference. The conference will be held on the campus of American University (Washington, DC, USA) on Friday, October 14 through Sunday, October 16, 2011.

Keynote speakers:

Gilles Fauconnier, UC San Diego
Jacques Moeschler, Université de Genève
Naomi Baron, American University

CALL FOR PAPERS
Abstracts are invited for presentations addressing issues of significance for cognitive linguistics with some bearing on data from the Slavic languages. As long as there is a cognitive orientation, papers may be on synchronic or diachronic topics in any of the traditional areas of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse analysis, or sociolinguistics. In addition to the Slavic Languages, relevant papers on other languages of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are also acceptable.

Abstracts may be submitted up until the deadline of April 8, 2011 to sclcAbstracts@gmail.com. Abstracts should be approximately 500 words, but strict word limits are not required. Notification of acceptance will be provided by May 31, 2011. The abstract should be submitted as a word or pdf file as an attachment to an email message with “SCLC abstract submission” in the subject headline. Abstracts should be anonymous, but the author’s name, affiliation and contact information should be included in the email message.

Most presentations at SCLC are given in English, but may be in the native (Slavic) language of the presenter. However, if the presentation is not to be made in English we ask that you provide an abstract in English in addition to an abstract in any other SCLA language. Each presentation will be given 20 minutes and will be followed by a 10-minute discussion period.

FURTHER INFORMATION
Information on transportation, accommodations, and the conference venue will be forthcoming. Please see the conference website for further information.
http://languages.uchicago.edu/scla

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CfP: 47th Annual Meeting of the Chicago Linguistics Society, University of Chicago, Abstract Deadline December 27

The 47th Annual Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society will be held April 7-9, 2011 at the University of Chicago. This year’s conference will include a general main session as well as a parasession on experimental methods in linguistic research.

Parasession

This session invites papers investigating linguistic questions using laboratory and experimental methods of various kinds. CLS 47 welcomes research in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, and related fields which use and analyze experimental data.

Invited parasession speakers

Yosef Grodzinsky – McGill University
Keith Johnson – University of California, Berkeley
Colin Phillips – University of Maryland

Main Session

Equal consideration will be give to papers from all major linguistic subfields and frameworks, as well as from related cross-disciplinary areas, regardless of focus.

Invited main session speakers

Juliette Blevins – The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Angelika Kratzer – University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Norvin Richards – Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Presentation Format

All talks will be given 20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions. Presented papers will be published in the CLS Proceedings.

Abstract Guidelines

  • Abstracts must be submitted in PDF format, with filename Paper Title.pdf (e.g., The Morphophonemics of Robojibwe.pdf).
  • Include title and keywords (i.e., CLS session title, language, language family, linguistics subfield) in the abstract.
  • Abstract may be no more than 500 words in length, no smaller than 12-point font, with 1-inch margins. Data, keywords, and references are not included in the final word count, but please intersperse data within the main text of the abstract as much as possible. Do not put data on a separate page. Total abstract (including data and references) should not exceed 2 pages.
  • Author name(s) must not appear on the abstract or file name! Submissions are anonymized and the author’s name will be associated with the abstract by the Easy Abstract system. Please note that abstracts submitted to CLS 47 will be evaluated under a two-tiered review system involving both external and internal reviewers.

Submission

Please submit your abstract at our Easy Abstracts submission site.

All abstracts must be submitted by 11:59 PM CST on Monday, December 27, 2010.

For questions not answered in this call, please contact us at:
chicagolinguisticsociety@gmail.com

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences, University of Chicago Events
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Turkic Applied Linguist, Indiana University – Bloomington, December 15

Turkic Applied Linguist

The Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University-Bloomington invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track faculty position in Turkic Applied Linguistics beginning August 2011 at the rank of Assistant Professor.

Applicants must hold a doctorate or anticipate its completion by the time of the appointment, in a field of second language acquisition (applied linguistics). Candidates should have a record of publications on Turkic applied linguistics/second language acquisition.

Candidates should have native or near native fluency in Turkish or another Turkic language. The successful candidate will teach classes in Turkish or other Turkic languages and in second language acquisition/applied linguistics, coordinate and supervise language instruction in the department, and play an active role in Indiana University’s Title VI Language Resource Center, the Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region. The candidate will also be expected to pursue grant opportunities for expanding the Turkic language program at Indiana University. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

For full consideration, complete applications must be received by December 15, 2010. Send paper copies of your letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a writing sample or samples approximately 25 pages in length, as well as three signed copies of letters of recommendation, to Turkic Applied Linguist Search Committee, Department of Central Eurasian Studies, Indiana University, 157 Goodbody Hall, 1011 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7005.

Indiana University is an Equal Employment/Affirmative Action Employer. Women and minorities are especially encouraged to apply.

Posted in: Job Postings
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Digital Media Archive Graduate Intern, The Digital Media Archive in the Division of the Humanities

VACANCY

Job Title: Digital Media Archive Graduate Intern

Job duties:

The Digital Media Archive in the Division of the Humanities is seeking a graduate student employee in linguistics, anthropology, ethnomusicology, South Asian studies, or related discipline for the position of Digital Media Archive Graduate Intern. Interns identify and catalog audio recordings of endangered languages for preservation purposes. Training will be provided. This is an excellent opportunity to hear native speakers of endangered languages and to learn about audio technology, metadata standards, and the inner workings of digital archives. For more information about the DMA, please see http://dma.uchicago.edu.

Fluency in multiple languages, familiarity with endangered languages as identified by UNESCO, familiarity with the Macintosh operating system, aptitude for attention to many small details, and ability to work independently are strongly preferred. Students with work-study awards will be given priority. Exceptional candidates without work-study awards will also be considered. To apply, please send a brief statement of interest and resume to mmacken@uchicago.edu.

Desired begin date: ASAP
End date: March 18, 2010, possibility of continuing into next quarter based on performance
Hrs/Wk: up to 10

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