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Call for Papers for Special Issue of Language Learning & Technology

Call for Papers for Special Issue of LLT

Theme: Technology and the Less Commonly Taught Languages

Special Issue Editor: Irene Thompson

This special issue of Language Learning & Technology will focus on the role played by educational technologies in the learning and teaching of LCTLs (i.e., languages other than the traditionally taught Western European languages such as English, French, German, and Spanish). Currently, less than ten percent of students enrolled in foreign language courses in the US study languages such as Arabic, Farsi, Pashto, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Hindi, Korean, Indonesian, Tagalog, Thai, Turkish, Vietnamese, Swahili, Yoruba, and other languages critically important to US national interests. These languages are typologically different from English and are often written in non-Roman scripts requiring extended seat time to attain a working proficiency. With instruction often not offered at all, offered on an irregular basis, or available only at the elementary levels, technology presents a wide range of opportunities to develop and deliver instructional materials and methodologies based on sound empirical research.

Please consult the LLT Website for general guidelines on submission (http://llt.msu.edu/contrib.html) and research (http://llt.msu.edu/resguide.html).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* empirical studies of the impact of CALL-based materials on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading, writing, vocabulary, or grammar skills at various levels of proficiency in a range of LCTLs

* intergration of authentic Internet-based materials into LCTL courses, particularly at the intermediate and advanced levels

* uses of CMC to promote interactive speaking and writing in a range of LCTLs

* studies of the effectiveness of various technological tools in improving pronunciation or listening in a range of LCTLs, particularly those with tonal systems

* studies of the uses of technology in the acquisition of non-Roman scripts or in reading non-Roman scripts (e.g., Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, and Russian)

* uses of various types of media in LCTL teacher education

* uses of CMC to promote online intercultural exchanges

* evaluation of uses of technology in self-directed study of LCTLs

* uses of videoconferencing either for distance learning or for adding remote classes to live LCTL classes

Please send letter of intent and 250-word abstract by June 1, 2011 to llted@hawaii.edu.

Publication timeline:

* June 1, 2011: Submission deadline for abstracts
* June 15, 2011: Invitation to authors to submit a manuscript
* November 1, 2011: Submission deadline for manuscripts
* February 1, 2013: Publication of special issue

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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Lecturer and Language Assistants positions 2011-2012, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Application Deadline April 29

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

THE DEPARTMENT OF SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

TEACHING POSITIONS

2011-2012

DEADLINE: Friday, April 29, 2011

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is soliciting applications
for the following positions in the 2011-2012 Slavic Languages and Literatures program.
All positions are dependent on availability of funds, final budgetary approval, and sufficient enrollments.

Lecturers

Russian: Elementary Russian, Russian through Pushkin, 2nd-Year Russian, Russian through Literary Readings, Russian for Heritage Learners, Russian Culture (see NOTE)
Czech: Elementary Czech, Intermediate Czech

Language Assistants

Russian: Elementary Russian, Russian through Pushkin, 2nd-Year Russian, Russian through Literary Readings,
3rd-Year Russian, 4th-Year Russian, Advanced Russian

Polish: Elementary, Intermediate
Czech: Elementary, Intermediate
Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian: Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced

Requirements

Applicants for all positions should have completed the course ’Teaching in Slavic Languages & Literatures’ (SLAV 31500) or equivalent training in language pedagogy.
Applicants for lectureships are normally expected to have served previously as language assistants or course assistants.

Those interested in any of these positions should submit: 

1) a completed application form (attached) and 2) a current CV to:

“Teaching Positions”
c/o Dr. Steven Clancy
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures (Foster 406)

Electronic submissions may be made by email to <sclancy@uchicago.edu>.


NOTE: Applicants for the Russian Culture (RUSS 244) course should note the following:
1) this course is taught by a team of two graduate student co-lecturers,
2) applicant teams should submit a course proposal and syllabus with their application,
3) this is a one quarter course that can be offered Aut, Win, or Spr; and
4) applicant teams should consult with Prof. Robert Bird or Prof. Malynne Sternstein before applying.

Application forms available in Foster 406 and here: slavicteaching2011(fill-in)

 

Posted in: Job Postings, University of Chicago Events
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Summer School of Slavonic Languages in Olomouc, Czech Republic, Application Deadline June 30

SUMMER SCHOOL OF SLAVONIC LANGUAGES
FACULTY OF ARTS, PALACKY UNIVERSITY IN OLOMOUC

25th course: July 23 – August 20, 2011

The Summer School of Slavonic Languages (SSSL) at the Philosophical Faculty of Palacký University in Olomouc organizes courses of Czech language for foreigners and also other courses in Slavonic languages, Russian language or Polish language in particular, for students from other countries. The Summer School is designed for professors, senior lecturers, lectors and students of Czech language and literature or Slavonic studies, translators, journalists and people from the general public interested in Czech language, literature, history, and culture. The programme comprises also courses for beginners. English and Czech are communicative languages used according to students’ level. The lessons are complemented with additional events – film club, theatre workshop, workshop of folklore dances, two one-day trips and a weekend trip to Prague, etc. (see below).

After finishing the intensive language course each student of the SSSL will receive a certificate stating the achieved language level (based on test results). The four-week SSSL course corresponds to one academic semester/term of Czech philology at the University. The number of credits will be awarded to the students by their home universities. Students, who fail the final exam or who will not finish the course from various reasons (see below), will receive a certification of attendance at the SSSL course.

Since 2007, the University has provided the students the opportunity to obtain an international certificate of the European Union, so called ECL exam – more information can be found on www.ecl.upol.cz,www.ecl-test.com or here. Information about the exam will be also provided during the summer course.

T rooms and the University library are available to students. Internet is also available to students accommodated in the dormitories of Palacký University.

Applicants for the Scholarship awarded by the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic are advised to contact the Czech Embassy in their home country. The scholarships are awarded only to candidates nominated by responsible authorities in the partner countries; the number of such participants is limited. More information about the application process, deadlines, etc. is to be found at Czech consulates and embassies abroad. If you prefer the Summer School in Olomouc to the other schools in the Czech Republic, please state this clearly in your application form.

You can participate in the Summer School course as an individually paying participant covering all the costs.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Summer Institute for Languages of the Muslim World (SILMW), the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Application Deadline April 1

Summer Institute for Languages of the Muslim World (SILMW)

The University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, is located just 2 1/2 hours southwest of Chicago in the sister towns of Champaign and Urbana. Housing is readily available on and off campus. It is the perfect location to spend your summer studying. The Department of Linguistics, with support from the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies , Center for African Studies, CIBER, Center for Global Studies,European Union Center and REEEC, offers the Summer Institute for Languages of the Muslim World (SILMW) with intensive courses in a variety of Muslim world languages, including Arabic, Bosnian, Pashto, Persian, Swahili, Turkish, Urdu and Wolof. The eight-week program incorporates intensive languages study with cultural experience and activities. Course material covers two semesters of study for each prospective language, which is transferable to many universities for credit.

As SILMW participants, students are able to utilize all UI resources, which include an extensive library network, high quality gyms, campus wi-fi, computer labs, and others. The application is available online athttp://silmw.linguistics.uiuc.edu/students.html and the application fee is only $150 for graduate or undergraduate students.  Past students have enjoyed their experience with SILMW and plan to return to the program.  Note that due to an agreement with the university administration, all SILMW students will pay in-state tuition fees regardless of their resident states!

Deadline to apply: April 1, 2011

Dates of study: June 11 – August 4, 2011

Website: http://silmw.linguistics.uiuc.edu/

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Summer 2011 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago, Application Deadline May 15

Summer 2011 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago
* courses in Russian at the first-year and second-year levels
* two 3-week courses in simultaneous interpretation in Russian<->English (open to students at multiple levels)
* all courses run 6 weeks, June 20-July 29, 2011
* these 6 week courses are equivalent to one year (3 quarters) of study in the UofC program during the academic year
* the first-year courses prepare you to satisfy the undergraduate Language Competency requirement in only 6 weeks of study
* courses will be supplemented by weekly lunches from area Slavic restaurants and possible field trips to Russian, Czech, Polish, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian restaurants, shops, etc. in Chicago
Program descriptions are available at:
and registration and tuition details are available from the Graham School at:
_________________________________________________________
Summer 2011 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago
Summer Russian Courses

RUSS 11100 Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 11200 Intensive Introduction to Russian Langauge and Culture 2; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 11300 Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff

RUSS 20111 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20201 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 2; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20301 Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff

RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian); Instructor: Valentina Pichugin
RUSS 21701 Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian); Instructor: Valentina Pichugin

Introductory Russian (1st-year Russian)

RUSS 11100 Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1
RUSS 11200 Intensive Introduction to Russian Langauge and Culture 2
PREREQUISITES: NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED. EQUIVALENT TO ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN (RUSS 10100-10200-10300).

This six-week course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Russian for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Students will also be introduced to Russian culture through readings, screenings, and city outings. The course provides a year of Russian in two 3-week summer quarter courses.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (90 total contact hours). Students must take both courses in the sequence (11100-11200), and will be billed for two courses. This course is suitable for preparing students to satisfy the College Language Competency requirement. Students with FLAS fellowships require an additional 50 contact hours and are required to take RUSS 11300 “Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading”. This course is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

RUSS 11300 Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading
PREREQUISITES: NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED. STUDENTS MUST BE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN RUSS 11100-11200.

This six-week course provides practice in conversation, reading for research, and additional grammar drill complementing material covered in RUSS 11100-11200 “Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1 and 2″. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.

Class meets 2 hours daily, Monday-Thursday (50 total contact hours). There will be one Friday 2-hour session during the first week of class. Students must be concurrently enrolled in RUSS 11100-11200. This course is required for all students with FLAS fellowships and is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTWTh 1:00pm-2:50pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

Intermediate Russian (2nd-year Russian)

RUSS 20111 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1
RUSS 20201 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 2
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 10100-10200-10300/RUSS 10400-10500-10600 OR ONE-YEAR KNOWLEDGE OF RUSSIAN REQUIRED. EQUIVALENT TO SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN (RUSS 20110-20200-20300).

This six-week course provides a comprehensive continuing course in modern Russian for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Russian culture will be explored through readings, screenings, and city outings. The course provides a year of Russian in two 3-week summer quarter courses.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (90 total contact hours). Students must take both courses in the sequence (20111-20201), and will be billed for two courses. Students with FLAS fellowships require an additional 30 contact hours and are required to take RUSS 20301 “Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading”. This course is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

RUSS 20301 Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading
PREREQUISITES: STUDENTS MUST BE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN RUSS 20011-20012.

This six-week course provides practice in conversation, reading for research, and additional grammar drill complementing material covered in RUSS 20011-20012 “Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1 and 2″. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.

Class meets 2 hours daily, Monday-Thursday (50 total contact hours). There will be one Friday 2-hour session during the first week of class. Students must be concurrently enrolled in RUSS 20011-20012. This course is required for all students with FLAS fellowships and is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTWTh 1:00pm-2:50pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

Simultaneous Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)

RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)
PREREQUISITES: FLUENCY IN ENGLISH AND RUSSIAN. STUDENTS WITH NO PRIOR EXPERIENCE IN INTERPRETING WILL WORK FROM THEIR “WEAKER” LANGUAGE INTO THEIR STRONGER; STUDENTS WITH MORE PRACTICE (ADVANCED AND IMMERSION COURSES, TIME LIVING IN RUSSIA, RAISED IN RUSSIAN SPEAKING HOUSEHOLDS, ETC.) WILL PRACTICE BOTH WAYS.

This course introduces students to the field of conference interpretation in general and to consecutive interpretation in particular. It emphasizes the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (Russian/English) and convey it in the target language (English/Russian) in a straightforward and clear manner. The course develops a student’s ability to analyze and paraphrase the meaning of a passage in the source language, and to identify the passage’s components and establish a logical relationship among them. Students will focus on active listening and concentration skills, memory enhancing techniques, and the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall. Basic elements of note-taking will be discussed as well. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret 3-5 minute extemporaneous passages on familiar topics. During practice sessions students will listen to and repeat the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Topics will cover daily life, current events and the media, as well as general areas of students’ interest.
Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (45 total contact hours). [Hyde Park] Session I (3 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Valentina Pichugin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

RUSS 21701 Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian)
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 21700 INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETATION, OR EQUIVALENT; CONSENT OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

This course develops skills and improves techniques acquired in RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation. In consecutive interpretation, the following will be emphasized: clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction and presentation, and strategies for dealing with cultural and linguistic problems. Students will expand their active vocabulary to include terms and idioms frequent in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret extemporaneous passages of moderate difficulty derived from professional settings (sources will vary). Basic strategies for simultaneous interpretation will be introduced, and exercises will be provided to help develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time. The students will work to master voice management, and to acquire smooth delivery techniques. Students will learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent interpretation in the target language with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret 8-10 minute passages from public lectures, radio addresses, interviews, news reports, etc.
Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (45 total contact hours). [Hyde Park] Session II (3 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Valentina Pichugin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2975 for academic credit per course or $2000 per course for auditors.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European, and Central Asian Languages, Indiana University

Intensive language training has been offered at the Bloomington campus of Indiana University since 1950. The Summer Workshop provides up to 200 participants in Slavic, East European and Central Asian languages the opportunity to complete a full year of college language instruction during an eight-week summer session.

Utilizing the resources of Indiana University’s own specialists as well as native speakers from other universities and abroad, the Summer Workshop has developed and maintained a national program of the highest quality. Allowing all participants to pay in-state tuition fees, the program has as its goal the enhancement of speaking, reading, listening and writing skills through classroom instruction and a full range of extra-curricular activities. Fellowships and funding are available.

Please visit the Program’s website for more information.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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2011 Critical Languages Institute Students’ and Instructors’ Opportunities at Arizona State University, Deadline March 1


Arizona State University is now accepting applications for the Summer 2011 session of its Critical Languages Institute (CLI).

CLI courses are tuition free. Full and partial fellowships are available for most languages.

CLI offers two tracks:

TRACK ONE is an 8+3 hybrid program: 8-weeks on the ASU Main Campus with an optional 3-week overseas continuation course (May 31-July 23 at ASU, July 25 – August 12 overseas):

-          Albanian (Arizona & Tirana)
-          Armenian (Arizona & Yerevan)
-          Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (Arizona & Sarajevo)
-          Farsi (Arizona & Dushanbe)
-          Hebrew (Arizona)
-          Macedonian (Arizona & Ohrid)
-          Persian (Arizona & Dushanbe)
-          Polish (Arizona & Poznan)
-          Russian (Arizona & Kazan)
-          Tajik (Arizona & Dushanbe)
-          Uzbek (Arizona & Tashkent)
-          Yiddish (Arizona)

TRACK TWO is an 8-week program in Kazan, Russia (June 20 – August 12):

-          Russian (200, 300 and 400 levels only)
-          Tatar (all levels)

Application deadline: March 1, 2011.

For more information, see: http://cli.asu.edu or email cli@asu.edu.

In addition CLI is hiring language instructors for the following languages and levels:

Intermediate Albanian
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian
Elementary & Intermediate Macedonian

Applications received by December 17, 2010 will have first priority. Thereafter applications will be reviewed weekly until the search is
closed.

Application package must include a detailed letter of interest stating qualifications and teaching experience; a CV; and a list of three references. Materials should be sent to cli@asu.edu or mailed to BCS Search Committee, Critical Languages Institute, PO Box 874202, Tempe, AZ, 85287-4202.

Posted in: Job Postings, Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Grant Proposal: The Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning & The Center for the Study of Languages

THE CONSORTIUM FOR LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING
THE CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF LANGUAGES
At the University of Chicago

CALL FOR CONSORTIUM GRANT PROPOSALS for Winter Projects — CAMPUS COMPETITION (University of Chicago)

PROPOSALS DUE Friday, January 14, 2011

The Autumn/Winter deadline for Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning grant proposals is Friday, January 14, 2011. Proposals submitted at this time will compete at the campus level. Application forms and guidelines can be downloaded from the Center for the Study of Languages web site (http://languages.uchicago.edu/about/services.htm — Services & Policies>Services for Teachers>Grants and Funding). Please submit completed proposals as MS Word email attachments to mb35@uchicago.edu (Michael Berger); proposals will be reviewed by the Consortium Committee in early February, 2011.

The proposed project must pertain to the teaching or the learning of language. We are urging those of you involved with language teaching to consider in particular a project that might explore new ways of making use of already existing technologies and materials, such as commercially available audio and video files or computer programs. We also encourage you to formulate projects that are aimed at developing teaching skills–your own and your colleagues–using the hardware presently in use at the University, in the Center for the Study of Languages, and in the various multimedia-equipped classrooms around campus.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.), University of Chicago Events
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