Blog Archives

Lecture: “Freedom and Its Discontents: Varieties of Muslim Experience in Europe and the Middle East,” Professor Unni Wikan, Department of Comparative Human Development, May 5

Dear Faculty and Students,

The Department of Comparative Human Development presents: The Lurcy Lecture

“Freedom and Its Discontents:
Varieties of Muslim Experience in Europe and the Middle East”

Professor Unni Wikan
Lurcy Visiting Professor in the Department of Comparative Human Development

Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo, Norway

_________________________________________________________

4:30 PM, Thursday, May 05, 2011

Location: Stuart Hall, Room 105

Reception to follow in Pick Hall Lounge

Posted in: University of Chicago Events
Tagged: , , , , ,

SSRC Small Grants Program “Academia in the Public Sphere: Islamic Traditions and Muslim Societies in World Contexts”, Deadline December 3

The Social Science Research Council is pleased to announce the availability of grants to support public engagement by academic experts on Islamic traditions and Muslim societies. The grants program seeks to encourage projects permitting the dissemination of academic research on Islamic traditions and Muslim societies to targeted constituencies, with particular emphasis on media and policymakers. With this program the SSRC looks to nurture the public relevancy of area studies research by promoting strategic partnerships that will break down barriers and build connections between academic researchers, journalists, policymakers, and practitioners. The SSRC also seeks to assist faculty in developing the necessary skills they require to be able to engage specialized nonacademic audiences on the topic of Islam in the world. Please download the program description for more information.

Posted in: Job Postings, Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
Tagged: ,

“Crossroads of Faith: Between Christianity and Islam” a Talk by Eliza Griswold through The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, September 28

The following message comes to CEERES from The Chicago Council on Global Affairs:

Eliza Griswold, award-winning investigative journalist, poet, writer, and now Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation, has spent the past five years living and researching along the tenth parallel. A recipient of the 2010 Rome Prize from The American Academy in Rome, Griswold has won awards for both her  non-fiction works and her poetry. A former Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, she reports on religion, conflict, and human rights. Her first book of poems, Wideawake Field, was published in 2007. Her writings have appeared in The New YorkerThe Atlantic MonthlyHarpers, and The New Republic, among other publications.

Griswold will be presenting a public lecture called, “Crossroads of Faith: Between Christianity and Islam” on September 28 at 5:30pm at the InterContinental Hotel (505 North Michigan Avenue).

Her latest book, The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches from the Fault Line Between Christianity and Islam, will be available for purchase and signing following the program.

For more information, please click here.

Posted in: Chicago Events
Tagged: , ,

Jewish-Muslim Community Building Fellowship, Deadline: August 31

The Jewish Council on Urban Affairs (JCUA) is seeking applications from interested candidates with a ‘strong Muslim or Jewish background’ for its 2010-11 year long Jewish-Muslim Community Building fellowship. The fellowship includes a modest stipend. For more information, please read the information from their flyer below:

and here is the second page of the JCUA announcement:

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
Tagged: ,

Call for Papers: Perspectives on Kurban Said’s Ali and Nino – Literary, Cultural, and Linguistic Contributions, Abstract Deadline: September 15

Call for Papers
Perspectives on Kurban Said’s Ali and Nino: Literary, Cultural, and Linguistic Contributions

The editors of this proposed volume seek papers that look at Kurban Said’s novel Ali und Nino (1937) from a wide range of perspectives and approaches (e.g., literary and cultural studies, linguistics, Jewish studies, gender studies, philosophy and religion) and that reflect on the text’s usefulness in the classroom from linguistic and content perspectives. Our aim is to provide a broad companion to Kurban Said’s text that helps its readers to understand the many different possible scholarly approaches and the heterogeneous readings different frameworks make possible.

Since the publication of Tom Reiss’s 1999 essay ‘The Man from the East’ (The New Yorker, October 4, 1999: 68‐83) and his subsequent book The Orientalist: Solving the Mystery of a Strange and Dangerous Life (New York: Random House, 2005), much more has come to light about Ali und Nino’s author. ‘Kurban Said,’ an alias of Lev Nussimbaum (1905‐1942), grew up in a Jewish household in Baku, Azerbaijan, converted to Islam and then fled to Berlin to work as a journalist and expert on the Orient under the name Essad Bey in the 1920s and 1930s. Interest in Lev Nussimbaum’s life and texts sparked by Tom Reiss’s journalistic work has led to the republication of Ali und Nino in German and English. Set in Baku around 1917, Ali und Nino tells the love story between a young Arab, Muslim man Ali and a
young Georgian, Christian woman Nino. Not only is the novel a rare example of early Germanophone literature written by a multilingual speaker from outside of the German‐speaking world, but it also takes up cultural constructions of the Orient and Occident long before Edward Said’s seminal Orientalism published in 1978. Yet, despite recent interest in the author and the book’s ability to thematize modern debates and discussions of culture, virtually no scholarly literature on Ali und Nino exists. The proposed volume seeks to change this by inviting scholars from all kinds of different backgrounds to shed their light on Ali und Nino. Themes and topics to explore may include, but are not limited to:

• East‐West dialogues
• Cultural clash(es)
• Tradition and modernity
• Religion and identity
• Love and affect
• Youth and coming of age
• Authorship and attribution
• Multilingualism

The editors envision papers solicited not just as academic exercises, but also welcome approaches that emphasize the text’s relevance for teaching literature in a culturally heterogeneous classroom. For the classroom, Said’s engaging narrative style and the book’s interesting thematic focus make the novel an accessible and relevant text for students of German to engage with linguistically and intellectually. The novel also promises teachers and students opportunities for rich dialogue about modern‐day issues. Please contact us as soon as possible, if you are interested in contributing to this volume so that we can have a preliminary discussion about the scope of your paper.

Deadline for 400‐word abstract: September 15, 2010
Deadline for final version of essay: August 15, 2011

Please e‐mail your materials to both editors:

Cori Crane, Asst. Professor (ccrane@illinois.edu) & Carl Niekerk, Assoc. Professor (niekerk@illinois.edu) Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign 2090 Foreign Language Building, 707 S. Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
Tagged: , , , ,

“Islam and the Armenians: Looking at the Near East Differently,” Prof. Seta Dadoyan, May 11

The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago presents:

Islam and the Armenians: Looking at the Near East Differently

By Prof. Seta Dadoyan

Made possible by the Armenian Studies Endowment at the University of Chicago and the Ara and Edma Dumanian Foundation

Tuesday, May 11
6:30 pm
Pick Lounge
5828 S. University Ave, Chicago, IL 60637

Open to Public

Reception to follow

Posted in: University of Chicago Events
Tagged: ,

Call for Proposals: “The Turks and Islam,” Indiana University, Deadline: May 1

Call for Proposals: “The Turks and Islam”
The Indiana University Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies Chair will host a
multidisciplinary international conference entitled “The Turks and Islam” on
September 11, 2010 in Bloomington, IN, USA. The conference will explore the
many aspects of the Turkic-speaking peoples’ interactions with Islam
throughout the centuries. Scholars, independent researchers, and advanced
graduate students of all disciplines are encouraged to send paper proposals
(approximately 200 words) along with brief CVs to Professor Kemal Silay
(tsp@indiana.edu). All papers presented at the conference will be considered
for publication in an edited volume.

Deadline for proposals: May 1, 2010.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
Tagged: , ,

New Website: “Chicago’s Muslims In Their Own Voices”

The University of  Chicago’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies is pleased to announce that its newest resource, “Chicago’s Muslims In Their Own Voices,” is now up and running.

The site features interviews with Muslims in the city. The interviews are available for either live streaming or download.

http://chicagomuslims.uchicago.edu/

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.), University of Chicago Events
Tagged:

Conference: Workshop for K-12 teachers on Teaching about Islam, October 24

Ever since “9/11” teachers in America at all grade levels, and particularly at the secondary level, have had to face many questions about Islam and its role in the world. With textbooks and media often providing erroneous information, a need has emerged to better understand the religion and the cultures that practice it. On October 24, instructors from Georgetown University’s Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding will present a workshop at NIU-Rockford for teachers of grades K-12. Sessions will cover such topics as “Basic Beliefs and Practices of Islam,” “Contemporary Hot-Button Issues,” “Historical Issues in Teaching about Islam, and “Building a Comfort Zone.” Please visit the workshop website to see the complete schedule: http://www.niu.edu/history/teacher_certification/Professional%20Dev/Genocide.shtml.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
Tagged:

Small Grants Opportunity: SSRC-funded grant initiative – “Academia in the Public Sphere: Islamic Traditions and Muslim Societies in World Contexts”, Deadline: January 19, 2010

The SSRC is pleased to announce the availability of grants to support public engagement by academic experts on Islamic traditions and Muslim societies. The grants program seeks to encourage projects permitting the dissemination of academic research on Islamic traditions and Muslim societies to targeted constituencies, with particular emphasis on media and policymakers. With this program the SSRC looks to nurture the public relevancy of area studies research by promoting strategic partnerships that will break down barriers and build connections between academic researchers, journalists, policymakers, and practitioners. The SSRC also seeks to assist faculty in developing the necessary skills they require to be able to engage specialized nonacademic audiences on the topic of Islam in the world. Applications must be submitted through the online application portal which can be found on the SSRC website and will be live on October 31, 2009. No hard copies will be accepted. Interested applicants are encouraged to review the online materials athttp://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/islam-and-muslims-in-world-contexts/ in advance of submitting a proposal. Contact Tom Asher, Program Officer, at apsg@ssrc.org for more information. Deadline: January 19, 2010.

Application portal: http://soap.ssrc.org/

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
Tagged: