Blog Archives

Film: The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnaussus (2009), Debartolo Performing Arts Center, University of Notre Dame, March 31

THU MAR 31, 2011 • 7:00PM – 9:30PM
BROWNING CINEMA, DEBARTOLO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

A fantastical morality tale, set in present-day, the Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus is the story of a travelling show where members of the audience get an irresistible opportunity to choose between light and joy or darkness and gloom. Cursed with a dark secret, the Doctor made a deal with the devil centuries ago for immortality. Upon meeting his one true love, he made another deal with devil trading his immortality for youth on the condition that when his daughter reaches her sixteenth birthday, she would become the property of the devil.

In a captivating, explosive and wonderfully imaginative race against time, Dr. Parnassus must fight to save his daughter in a never-ending landscape of surreal obstacles and undo the mistakes of his past once and for all.

A guest speaker (TBA) will introduce the film.

View the Trailer

Purchase Tickets Online or call 574-631-2800
$6, $5 faculty/staff, $4 senior citizens, and $3 all students
FREE tickets are available at the institute for faculty fellows and minors in the European Studies program.

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Film: Karamazovi (2008), Debartolo Performing Arts Center, University of Notre Dame, April 14

THU APR 14, 2011 • 7:00PM – 9:30PM
BROWNING CINEMA, DEBARTOLO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Director Petr Zelenka will be present to introduce the film.
An Interview with Petr Zelenka

Petr Zelenka

Petr Zelenka (born August 21, 1967 in Prague, Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic) is an award-winning Czech playwright and director of theatre and film. His films have been recognized at international festivals in Moscow and Rotterdam. His filmKaramazovi (The Brothers Karamazov) was the Czech Republic’s official Oscar submission for Best Foreign Language Film in 2008.

The Brothers Karamazov

View the Trailer

A theatre company from Prague arrives in Krakow to present a stage adaptation of Dostoevsky’s novel “The Brothers Karamazov” at the city’s alternative drama festival; the production is to be staged in an unusual venue – the local steelworks. As rehearsals get under way, we follow not only the emotional story examining issues of faith, immortality and the salvation of the human soul, but also the relationships within the acting troupe itself, which strangely reflect Dostoevsky’s “great” themes. The stage drama is transferred to the real world when a tragedy occurs during rehearsal involving one of the spectators.

Purchase Tickets Online or call 574-631-2800
$6, $5 faculty/staff, $4 senior citizens, and $3 all students
FREE tickets are available at the institute for faculty fellows and minors in the European Studies program.

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Film: Katyn (2007), Debartolo Performing Arts Center, University of Notre Dame, January 28

KATYN (2007)

NANOVIC INSTITUTE FILM SERIES

Presented by the University of Notre Dame’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies.

Acclaimed Polish director Andrzej Wajda (Ashes and Diamonds, Man of Iron) recounts the tragic story of the 1940 Katyn Massacre in which thousand of Polish citizens were executed by the Soviet secret police.

Thursday, January 27th, at 7pm.

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Film: The Righteous Enemy, Cassidy Theater, January 28

The Righteous Enemy

At the height of World War II, while the Nazis and most of their allies were deporting and exterminating the Jews of Europe, some 40,000 found protection in the most unlikely of places: territories occupied by the army of Fascist Italy. In areas under their occupation in Croatia, France and Greece, Italian soldiers and diplomats refused to collaborate in the “Final Solution”, despite orders from Mussolini himself to comply with the German requests.

This documentary film takes the form of a personal investigation by the director, Joseph Rochlitz, whose father, Imre Rochlitz was saved by the Italians in occupied Croatia. The film widens out to describe the Italian rescue efforts in France and Greece between 1941 and 1943, and seeks to understand the motives behind this extraordinary Italian attitude. Produced in 1987 and re-edited in 1994, this documentary includes rare interviews with some of the protagonists of the Italian rescue efforts, as well as the testimony of Jews saved by their actions.

Historical consultants appearing in the film are Menachem Shelah (Yad Vashem, Israel) and Serge Klarsfeld, the French lawyer and historian. The wartime memoirs of Imre Rochlitz, Accident of Fate, on which this documentary is based, are scheduled to be published by Wilfrid Laurier University Press in 2011.

Directed by Joseph Rochlitz, 57 minutes. Presented with the Istituto Italiano di Cultura.

Dates:
Jan 28, 2011
Hours:
6:30 pm
Location:
Chicago Cultural Center
78 E. Washington St., Claudia Cassidy Theater
Chicago, IL 60602
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Film: Uzbek Rhapsody: The Films of Ali Khamraev, Gene Siskel Film Center, February 12 – March 3

From our friends at Siskel Film Center:

Uzbek Rhapsody: The Films of Ali Khamraev

“If there is a giant who sits astride the history of Uzbek cinema, it’s Ali Khamraev, one of those rare talents like Welles or Godard or Scorsese whose love for the medium is so intense that his best films burst with criss-crossing energies and insights, like a fireworks display.”—Kent Jones, Film Comment

From February 12 through March 3, the Gene Siskel Film Center, in collaboration with Seagull Films, presents Uzbek Rhapsody: The Films of Ali Khamraev, a series of eight rarely seen films shown in 35mm prints specially imported from Russia and Central Asia for this touring retrospective.

This series highlights the work not only of an overlooked director but also of a rich and under-explored frontier on the cinematic map. The cinema of the Central Asian Soviet republics–sometimes referred to as “the ‘stans”–began to emerge from the shadow of the USSR in the 1960s, with the decline of Stalinist orthodoxy and increased investment in regional film industries. In recent years, following the breakup of the Soviet Union, Central Asian cinema has come even more sharply into focus, with the growing recognition of distinct filmmaking traditions in each of its nations, and of a group of major filmmakers ripe for discovery in the west, including Tolomush Okeev of Kyrgyzstan, Darezhan Omirbaev and Ardak Amirkulov of Kazakhstan, and, preeminently, Ali Khamraev of Uzbekistan.

Born in the Uzbek capital of Tashkent in 1937, Khamraev made his directing debut in 1964 and first attracted critical attention with the 1966 adultery drama WHITE, WHITE STORKS (playing Feb. 12 & 14). He achieved popular success in the late 1960s and 1970s with a series of action films set in Central Asia during the civil wars of 1920s: RED SANDS (1969), THE EXTRAORDINARY COMMISAR (1970), THE BODYGUARD (1979, playing Feb. 19 & 24), and his biggest hit, THE SEVENTH BULLET (1972, playing Feb. 26 & 28). Resembling American and spaghetti westerns, these films deftly mix ideological issues with superb action scenes and stunning landscapes. As critic Olaf Möller (Film Comment) notes, “Khamraev is a born storyteller…a Genghis Khan-ian giant of genre filmmaking.”

Khamraev also began expanding his range, becoming “a director of extraordinary versatility” (Peter Rollberg, Historical Dictionary of Russian and Soviet Cinema). MAN FOLLOWS BIRDS (1975, playing Feb. 12 & 16), perhaps his most acclaimed film, is a phantasmagoric medieval odyssey that evokes Paradjanov and Tarkovsky (the latter both an inspiration and a personal friend). There are strong autobiographical elements in his period pieces TRIPTYCH (1979, playing Feb. 19 & 21) and I REMEMBER YOU (1986, playing Feb. 20 & 23). Khamraev also directed musicals, documentaries, and historical epics. Recurring themes in his films include the oppression of women (most strongly exemplified by 1971’s WITHOUT FEAR, playing Feb. 13 & 17) and the conflict between traditional and progressive forces. In the 1990s, Khamraev relocated to Italy; the offbeat sexual parable BO BA BU (1998, playing Feb. 26 & Mar. 3), his only film completed during this period, was a focus of controversy at several international film festivals. In 2004 he returned to Russia, where he has directed television miniseries.

This project is organized by Seagull Films in collaboration with Mardjani Foundation. Special thanks to Alla Verlotsky of Seagull Films.

—Martin Rubin

MAN FOLLOWS BIRDS (CHELOVEK UKHODIT ZA PTITSAMI) 1975, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 87 min.With Dzhanik Faiziyev, Dilorom Kambarova

WHITE, WHITE STORKS (BELIYE, BELIYE AISTI) 1966, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 82 min.With Lyutfi Sarymsakova, Sairam Isayeva

WITHOUT FEAR (BEZ STRAKHA) 1971, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 96 min.

THE BODYGUARD (TELOKHRANITEL) 1979, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Tadzhikistan, 91 min. With Aleksandr Kaidanovsky, Gulya Tashbayeva

TRIPTYCH (TRIPTIKH) 1979, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 76 min. With Dilorom Kambarova, Gulya Tashbayeva

I REMEMBER YOU (YA TEBYA POMNYU) 1985, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 92 min. With Vyacheslav Bogachyov, Zinaida Sharko

THE SEVENTH BULLET (SEDYMAYA PULYA) 1972, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Uzbekistan, 84 min. With Suimenkul Chokmorov, Dilorom Kambarova

BO BA BU 1998, Ali Khamraev, Uzbekistan/Italy/France, 82 min. With Arielle Dombasle, Abdrashid Abdrakhmanov

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Film: Chantrapas, An Evening with Director Otar Iosseliani, Friday February 11

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED

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Film: King Lear, Scored by Shostakovich, Directed by Kozintsev, Film Studies Center, Thursday January 27

King Lear

Scored by Shostakovich, Directed by Kozintsev

Thursday, January 27, 2011 – 7:00pm

Reserve seat(s) for this event


In their final collaboration, the sparse textures and sombre tones of Shostakovich’s late style color the score for Kozintsev’s vision of King Lear – a striking interpretation of Shakespeare’s tale of the doomed king. Based on a translation by Boris Pasternak and featuring Yuri Yarvet in his internationally acclaimed performance of the title role.

(USSR, 1971, 140 min, DVD, in Russian with English subtitles)

Scored by Shostakovich, Directed by Kozintsev
No other major composer devoted more of his career to film music than Dmitri Shostakovich, whose collaboration with Russian director Gregori Kozintsev spanned thirty years and seven films. In conjunction with The Soviet Art Experience and the Department of Music’s concert “Shostakovich’s Late Film Scores: The Gadfly, Hamlet and King Lear,” we celebrate the work of these two great artists.

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Film: Gamlet, Scored by Shostakovich, Directed by Kozintsev, Film Studies Center, Thursday January 20

Hamlet

Scored by Shostakovich, Directed by Kozintsev

Thursday, January 20, 2011 – 7:00pm

Reserve seat(s) for this event


Rarely seen in the US, Hamlet (or Gamlet, as it was known in Russia), Shakespeare’s 17th century masterpiece about the “Melancholy Dane,” was given one of its best screen treatments by Soviet director Grigori Kozintsev and scored by his frequent collaborator and friend, composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Kozintsev’s is a spare, haunting interpretation based on a translation by novelist Boris Pasternak. The malevolence afoot in the state of Denmark is magnificently captured by the foreboding black and white cinematography.   Shostakovich’s compositions drive the epic with fierce outbursts of percussion and high skittering woodwinds emphasizing the imagery – stone, iron, fire, earth and sea – which, for Kozintsev, expressed the essential nature of Shakespeare’s poetry.

(USSR, 1964, 140 min, DVD, in Russian with English subtitles)

Scored by Shostakovich, Directed by Kozintsev
No other major composer devoted more of his career to film music than Dmitri Shostakovich, whose collaboration with Russian director Gregori Kozintsev spanned thirty years and seven films. In conjunction with The Soviet Art Experience and the Department of Music’s concert “Shostakovich’s Late Film Scores: The Gadfly, Hamlet and King Lear,” we celebrate the work of these two great artists

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“(Trans)National Subjects. Framing Post-1989 Migration on the European Screen”, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven is pleased to announce the International Conference “(Trans)National Subjects. Framing Post-1989 Migration on the European Screen”, to be held December 15-17, 2011, in Leuven, Belgium. The conference is a joint initiative of the Chair of Slavic Studies, the Centre for Media Culture and Communication Technology, the Institute of International and European Policy and the Associated Faculty of Architecture and the Arts. It is organized with the additional support of the Research Group on Cinema & Diaspora (University of Antwerp and Ghent University) and the Cultural Service of the Polish Embassy in Belgium.

Confirmed speakers include Dominique Arel (University of Ottawa), Dina Iordanova (University of St. Andrews) and Ewa Mazierska (University of Central Lancashire). More details can be found at the conference website http://www.transnationalsubjects.eu.

“(Trans)National Subjects” – Call for papers

The past three decades have seen the rise of a transnational European cinema, not only in terms of financing and multilateral co-productions, but also in terms of a growing focus on multi-ethnic themes and realities within the European context. Undoubtedly, the collapse of the Iron Curtain and the subsequent (and on-going) enlargement of the European Union have played a major role in this shift from national to European filmmaking. Its most obvious on-screen manifestation is the increased visibility of immigrant groups from former communist countries in recent European film, ranging from Krzysztof Kieślowski’s “Blanc” (1994) and Paweł Pawlikowski’s “Last Resort” (2000) to Hans-Christian Schmid’s “Lichter” (2003) and Ken Loach’s “It’s a Free World” (2007).

Through its focus on cinematic representations of post-1989 migrations from the former Eastern Bloc to Western Europe, this conference seeks to examine what these films reveal about the cultures producing and consuming these migration narratives and to what extent these images function as a construction site for new (trans)regional, (trans)national and European identities. In order to do so, we welcome papers that investigate topics and questions such as:

– the particular variety of portrayals of (Eastern) European identities and narratives of mobility, displacement and belonging in specific European cinemas or in European cinema at large;
– the emergence of a European “accented cinema” (as coined by Hamid Naficy, 2001) involving migrant and diasporic filmmakers from the former Eastern Bloc;
– the degree in which the portrayal of newcomers in the cinemas of the “hosting” countries corresponds with or diverges from the representation of migratory practices in diasporic filmmaking and in the respective domestic cinemas (i.e., the cinemas of the postcommunist countries);
– the involvement of diasporic filmmakers from Central and Eastern Europe in redefining our understanding of European identity/ies as constructed and narrated in European national cinemas;
– the ways in which the complex narratives and often hybrid identities of the postcommunist immigrant characters intertwine with the ongoing geopolitical processes of intra-European border reorganization (creating a new dividing line between those countries with European Union membership and those without);
– convergences and divergences between post-1989 cinematic portrayals of Central and East European immigrants on the one hand and Cold War representations of “exiles” from the Eastern Bloc on the other hand;
– the extent to which the narratives and identities portrayed in these films share filmic traits and narrative arguments that link them to or set them apart from European and/or diasporic cinema dealing with immigrants from outside Europe (e.g. Beur cinema, British-Asian cinema, etc.);
– the increased visibility of characters from former communist countries in relation to American filmmaking and its long-standing tradition of depicting immigrant characters of Slavic/East European descent (in, for instance, gangster and historic film);
– the link between the filmic image of (mainly economy-driven) migration from former communist states on the one hand and a more general critique of post-1989 neoliberal capitalism and global economic culture (commodification, consumerism, …) on the other hand;
– the (trans)national dynamics that underlie the production, distribution and reception of these immigration narratives and images.

One page abstracts are to be sent to info@transnationalsubjects.eu by March 15, 2011. Notifications of the Organizing Committee’s decisions will be sent out by May 15, 2011. We strongly encourage the use of film clips and of modern presentation software, e.g. Powerpoint. The goal of this is to enhance the effectiveness of the presentation and to facilitate discussion afterwards. Laptops and beamers will be provided.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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Film: “Legend of Suram Fortress”, Georgia Movie Night

This quarter’s Georgian Movie Night will be this Wednesday, November 17th, from 4:30-6:00 in Cobb 218. There will be a showing Sergei Parajanov’s “Legend of Suram Fortress” in Georgian with English subtitles. For those unfamiliar with Parajanov — this is a visually stunning and rather surreal film.

Here is a brief synopsis from Kino Film.com: “Based on an ancient legend, this dazzling film by visionary director Sergei Paradjanov (Ashik Kerib, Shadows Of Our Forgotten Ancestors) is a surreal ode to Georgian warriors throughout the ages who died for their country. Repeated efforts by the Georgian people to construct a defensive stronghold continually fail. The building collapses until a fortune teller remembers an old prophecy that the son of her erstwhile lover must be bricked up alive in order for the fortress to stand. The young man is faced with the prospect of sacrificing himself to save his country.”

There will be (non-Georgian) refreshments. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact Tami Wysocki-Niimi

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