Blog Archives

Lecture: “The Black Death in Central Asia and the Middle East: Disruption and Cultural Transformation in the Turkic World,” Uli Schamiloglu, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, May 6

You are cordially invited to a talk in the Middle East/North African Speaker Series:

Uli Schamiloglu, Professor of Languages and Cultures of Asia, University of Wisconsin-Madison

“The Black Death in Central Asia and the Middle East: Disruption and Cultural Transformation in the Turkic World”

Friday, May 6

12:00pm-1:20 pm

Holton Hall 341

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
2442 E. Hartford Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53211

Dr. Schamiloglu is Chair of the Central Asian Studies Program and the Middle East Studies Program at University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research concerns the history of Turkic-Islamic Civilization, Turkic language and philology, and the social and economic history of the medieval Middle East and Central Asia. Awarded a Doctor honoris causa from the Tatar State University of the Humanities and Pedagogy in Russia, he is currently the advisor to Nazarbeyev University in Astana, Kazakhstan for the establishment of a School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Sponsored by:
Center for 21st Century Studies
Middle East and North African Studies Certificate Program Center for International Education Department of History

The Middle East Speaker Series is made possible by an International Studies and Foreign Languages grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

Posted in: Chicago Events
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Film: Mongol, Central Asian Studies Society, Harper 141, Wednesday, April 27, 6pm

THE CENTRAL ASIAN STUDIES SOCIETY PRESENTS:

М О Н Г О Л

Mongol_poster.jpg

Mongol: The Rise of Genghis Khan
2007
Starring Tadanobu Asano, Honglei Sun, Khulan Chuluun, Amadu Mamadakov
Written by Arif Aliev & Sergei Bodrov
Directed by Sergei Bodrov
2 hours 6 minutes
MPAA rated R for sequences of bloody warfare.

Award-winning Russian filmmaker Sergei Bodrov (Prisoner of the Mountains) illuminates the life and legend of Genghis Khan in his stunning historical epic, MongolMongol delves into the dramatic and harrowing early years of the ruler who was born as Temüjin in 1162. As it follows Temüjin from his perilous childhood to the battle that sealed his destiny, the film paints a multidimensional portrait of the future conqueror. Mongol shows us the making of an extraordinary man, and the foundation on which much so much of his greatness rested: his wife Börte, his lifelong love and most trusted advisor.

Mongol, from its thrilling battles to its intimate romance, has the look, scale,
story and feel of an old-fashioned epic in the best and biggest sense of the word.”
Orlando Sentinel

“The action sequences here are first-rate, the performances are uniformly excellent,
the cinematography as good as I’ve seen in any film this year.”
—Richard Roeper

“As a visual spectacle, it is all but overwhelming, putting to shame
some of the recent historical epics from Hollywood.”
—Roger Ebert

“Bodrov has simply created an overwhelmingly awesome Khan who could believably
conquer the overwhelmingly awesome landscape over the course of two more films.”
—M.E. Russell

Mongol is the first film of a proposed trilogy that charts his conquest of half the
known world. If the sequels match this one, they can’t come soon enough.”
Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“I don’t know the Mongolian word for panache, but Mongol‘s got plenty of it.
The battle scenes are as notable for their clarity as their intensity…”
Wall Street Journal

“Russian filmmaker Sergei Bodrov contrasts images of sweeping
landscape and propulsive battle with potent scenes of emotional
intimacy in Mongol, his quite grand, quite exotic, David Lean-style epic.”
Entertainment Weekly

Week 5, Wednesday, April 27, 6:00

Harper Hall, Room 141
Anyone needing assistance with accommodation, please e-mail Bill Walsh at wjwalsh@uchicago.edu.

Posted in: University of Chicago Events
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Film: Central Asian Studies Society trip to see The Bodyguard (Telokhranitel’), Gene Siskel Film Center, February 19

Salomlar O’rtoqlar!

You are Cordially Invited to Dinner and a Movie with the Central Asian Studies Society (CASS)

“The Bodyguard” (Telokhranitel)

February 19th at 3PM

at the Gene Siskel Film Center

Discounted Student Ticket Price is $7, and after the film students are invited to Jibek Jolu to sample traditional Kyrgyz dishes.

Please RSVP to Perry Wong (patomwong@gmail.com) by February 14 if you plan to participate in both the screening and dinner so travel arrangements can be made.

Film Synopsis:

THE BODYGUARD
(TELOKHRANITEL)
1979, Ali Khamraev, USSR/Tadzhikistan, 91 min.
With Aleksandr Kaidanovsky, Gulya Tashbayeva

Like THE SEVENTH BULLET (playing Feb. 26 & 28), THE BODYGUARD is an example of the “Red Western,” set again during the Basmachi Revolt of the 1920s. This time, however, the primary reference point is not Sergio Leone, but the classic Hollywood westerns of Budd Boetticher and Anthony Mann. When a Basmachi leader is captured, the Red Army enlists a veteran local hunter to escort the prisoner, accompanied by his servant and daughter, across difficult terrain, pursued every step of the way by I a relentless Basmachi usurper and his soothsayer wife. The morally ambiguous power struggles among the beleaguered group recall Mann’s great THE NAKED SPUR, as do the spectacular landscapes of snowy mountain and vast desert. In Russian with English subtitles. 35mm. (MR)

Posted in: University of Chicago Events
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US Embassy Policy Specialist (EPS) Program, IREX, Deadline March 15

2011-2012 FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY

US Embassy Policy Specialist (EPS) Program

IREX is pleased to announce 2011-2012 competition for the US Embassy Policy Specialist (EPS) Program.

EPS provides fellowships to US scholars and professionals for up to eight weeks to serve US Embassies in Eurasia as policy specialists on a chosen topic and pursue their own research project independently. EPS Grant covers the cost of travel and in-country housing and provides a stipend for living expenses.

Eligible Embassies and Fields (for more detailed descriptions of research fields please see application instructions posted on the link below):

Azerbaijan (US Embassy, Baku)
·        Caspian Geography/Environment
·        Labor
·        Education

Georgia (US Embassy, Tbilisi)
·        Media

Kazakhstan (US Embassy, Astana)
·        Civil Society
·        Foreign Relations

Kyrgyzstan (US Embassy, Bishkek)
·        Anti-Corruption
·        Policy Coordination
·        Cross-border trade

Russia
·        History of US-Russia Relations (US Consulate, St. Petersburg)
·        Environment (US Embassy, Moscow)
·        Science Policy (US Embassy, Moscow)
·        Energy/Public Policy (US Embassy, Moscow)

Tajikistan (US Embassy, Dushanbe)
·        International Relations
·        Economics/Corruption

Turkmenistan (US Embassy, Ashgabat)
·        Religion
·        Education
·        Alternative/Solar Energy

Ukraine (US Embassy, Kyiv)
·        Environmental Studies/Public Health

The EPS application and instructions are available on the IREX website:

http://www.irex.org/application/us-embassy-policy-specialist-program-eps-application

Completed applications are due no later than March 15, 2011

Scholars and Professionals with advanced degrees (PhD, MA, MS, MFA, MBA, MPA, MLIS, MPH, JD, MD) and US citizenship  are eligible to apply for the EPS Program.

Questions may be addressed to the EPS Program Staff at eps@irex.org or by telephone at 202-942-9111.

EPS is funded by the United States Department of State Title VIII Program

Posted in: Job Postings
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CfP: 17th Annual Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies Northwest Conference, University of Washington, Abstract Deadline January 24

The Seventeenth Annual Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies
Northwest Conference
Saturday, April 16, 2011
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Washington are currently soliciting papers, panels or roundtable presentations for this one-day interdisciplinary conference. Proposals from faculty, graduate students and members of the general public are all welcome.

Contributions are encouraged on literature, the fine arts, the environment, post-Soviet foreign policy, historical research, economics, national identity or any other relevant subjects. Papers related to health and the environment in Russia, East Europe and Central Asia are especially welcome.

Small travel stipends may be available to graduate students and faculty traveling from the Pacific Northwest. Funds are not available for scholars outside of the Pacific Northwest or residing outside the United States.

If you would like to present at the conference, please reply via catalyst survey by Monday, January 24, 2011 with your name and contact information, a paper title and brief abstract, at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/reecas/113844

If you have any questions, please contact:
Allison Dvaladze, Assistant Director for Outreach
The Herbert J. Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies
The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Box 353650, Thomson Hall, University of Washington
Seattle, Washington 98195-3650
Tel: (206) 543-4852
E-mail: dvaladze@uw.edu

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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CfP: “Decades of Asynchrony. Europe & Central Asia and the Dissolution of the Soviet Union”, University of Pittsburgh

EXTENDED DEADLINE: January 9th

University of Pittsburgh

Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia & Center for Russian and East European Studies present:

Decades of Asynchrony: Europe & Central Asia and the Dissolution of the Soviet Union

Eighth Annual Graduate Student Conference

February 25-26, 2011

2011 will mark the 20th anniversary of the dissolution of the Soviet Union. On 25 December 1991, in the midst of intrigues and political struggles Mikhail Gorbachev stepped down as General Secretary of the Communist Party. This event made official a change that leaders of several Republics – foremost Russia, Ukraine and Belarus – had already agreed upon: the dissolution of the USSR and the formation of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Only a few days prior to Gorbachev’s resignation the Soviet Republics of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan as well as Georgia had joined this movement.

Two years earlier, former Eastern European socialist states had already begun the transition to “democracy” and “market economy.” The year 2009 witnessed splendid and highly orchestrated twentieth anniversary celebrations of the end of state socialism in Eastern Europe. These predominantly Eurocentric celebrations tended to reduce the complexity of the change of regimes in Europe and subsequent developments in Central Asia and Russia to a near-teleological “return to the West.”. Such dissociation, at once deliberate and unconscious, falls short of acknowledging the interdependencies and complexities of the societies and cultures of Eurasia. This conference seeks to reverse the artificial separation of the European theatre from the later developments in the Soviet Union, and Central Asia in particular.

The 2009 commemorations of “1989” represent a longstanding estrangement of eastern Europe, the U.S.S.R., and Central Asia in the perceptions both of academia and the public at large. The overemphasis on 1989 willfully separates the interrelated, simultaneous processes in the Soviet Union and Central Asia, which “only” occurred in 1991. We wish to rethink this disjuncture not along the lines of “progress” or “backwardness,” but through “asynchrony”: a concept which rejects linear and normative ideas of development, and which refuses to see temporal differences as innate retardation. The Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia (GOSECA) of the University of Pittsburgh has committed its eighth annual conference to scholarship which seeks to improve our understanding of the asynchrony of this momentous process.

We strongly encourage submissions from the widest range of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, and are particularly looking for comparative approaches to Europe and/ or Central Asia and across time. Submissions may focus on any time period, but they should be broadly relatable to the 20th anniversary of the dissolution of the Soviet Union. They may include:

· social reordering and cultural disruptions: new personal and collective identities; the new face of old “Others”

· “democratization”: expectations and realizations of the role of government and its obligations

· economic disruptions; globalization integration of economies; distribution of resources formerly owned or controlled by the state

· the development of new, and reconfiguration of old, political institutions; the structuring of social institutions both formal and informal

· responses in literature, the arts, music, and “popular” culture

· the renegotiation of rights and freedoms: social crises and violent conflicts; the development of legal institutions and legal controversies

· demography and migration

· geopolitical concerns; state actors and international organizations; the conceptualization of new sovereignties

· public and personal health

· work and leisure

· environment: pollution, protection, and exploitation

Students currently enrolled in graduate programs are welcome to submit abstracts along with an academic CV to goseca.2011@gmail.com no later than December 15, 2010. We will contact the authors of accepted abstracts by January 1, 2011.

Submission Requirements

Abstracts should consist of a 250 word, double-spaced, 12 point font description of the project. All submissions must be in PDF (preferred) or Microsoft Word format. In order to ensure anonymity during the blind selection process, the body of the abstract should not contain the author’s or authors’ name(s) or other personal identifying information other than the title of the paper. The cover page must include: title of submission, author’s or authors’ name(s), institutional and departmental affiliation(s), e-mail address(es), mailing address(es), and a primary phone number. Although we require all of this information, correspondence will occur mainly via e-mail. An academic CV must also be submitted, but please limit these to two pages.

Paper Requirements

In order to facilitate presentation time limits, and to ensure time for active discussions, paper length will be limited to 8 typed pages, double-spaced, with 12-point font. All accepted participants will be required to submit a copy of the final paper one month prior to the conference.

Registration Requirements

To better promote a meaningful interdisciplinary exchange, participants are expected to attend all panels for the duration of the conference.

Although we cannot provide travel support, we will be happy to arrange housing for the duration of the conference with graduate students.

The registration fee is $25, which includes meals. Registration fee must be paid by cash or check at registration on February 25, 2011.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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School of Russian and Asian Studies (SRAS) Research Grants, Deadline September 17

Upperclassmen (juniors and seniors), graduate and postgraduate students in any field of study may apply for an SRAS Research Grant. The applicant must have a GPA of 3.2 or above and must be enrolled in an academic program based in North America or the European Union when applying. The applicant must also apply for an SRAS educational program (http://sras.org/programs) to be eligible.

Application deadline: September 17. For more information, please visit http://sras.org/research_grants_russia.

Please feel free to contact lhorner@sras.org with any questions.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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Call for Papers (Updated): “Environment, Identities, and Space in Europe and Central Asia,” Deadline: December 15

University of Pittsburgh Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia
& Center for Russian and East European Studies present:

Environment, Identities, and Space in Europe and Central Asia

Seventh Annual Graduate Student Conference
February 26-28, 2010

Keynote Address: Eagle Glassheim (University of British Columbia)

On the eve of the September 2009 meeting of the G20 in Pittsburgh, José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, spoke of the “new challenges of the 21st century” as “challenges that have no respect for borders.” Foremost among these Mr. Barroso listed climate change. He prevailed upon the citizens of all prosperous countries to cease gambling over the reality of environmental change and confront this threat with resolve. As he put it: “The time for playing high-stakes poker is over.”

From the city which welcomed the G20 summit, first heard Mr. Barroso’s call for action, and will host the 2010 UN World Environment Day, we raise a call of our own. The Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia (GOSECA) at the University of Pittsburgh has committed its seventh annual conference to scholarship which seeks to better understand the complex bonds between human beings and their environments. How have societies imagined the “natural” world and their relationship to it? What role did the environment play in shaping identities and spaces – political, cultural, and social? How have images and conceptualizations of environment shifted and how did such changes affect societies, their economies, politics, cultures, and identities? As sites of dramatic cultural, social and political transformations, Europe and Central Asia offer a vast potential in addressing these questions.

We strongly encourage submissions from the widest range of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities (and particularly those which cross disciplines) that address the issues of environment, identities, and space, their interplay and the way in which they affect processes in the region. Topics include but are not limited to:
• representations and interpretations in art, literature, geography/cartography, and history
• migration and demography
• policy and controversy
• “alternative voices”: environmentalism and dissident politics
• the shaping of social and cultural identities
• historical legacies of land and resource use
• political violence, war, and ecoterrorism
• energy security, resource management, and cultures of consumption

Students currently enrolled in graduate programs are welcome to submit abstracts, which should be no more than 250 words long. Please submit abstracts, along with an academic CV (limited to two pages) to gosecaconference@yahoo.com no later than December 15, 2009. We will contact the authors of accepted abstracts by January 1, 2010.
For the Call for Papers, information on GOSECA, and updated conference information, visit: http://www.pitt.edu/~sorc/goseca/Goseca2010/

ATTENTION: We are pleased to announce that this year we will be offering a limited number of videoconferencing opportunities to confirmed participants who, because of travel limitations, would otherwise be unable to present a paper. Selections will be made at the organizers’ discretion, but participants from Central Asia will receive preference.

Abstract Requirements
Abstracts must be no longer than 250 words. All submissions should be in PDF (preferred) or Microsoft Word format in a standard 12-point font and be double spaced. In order to ensure anonymity during the blind selection process, the body of the abstract should not contain the author’s or authors’ name(s) or other personal identifying information other than the title of the paper. The cover page must include: title of submission, author’s or authors’ name(s), institutional and departmental affiliation(s), e-mail address(es), geographic address(es), and a primary phone number. Although we require all of this information, correspondence will occur mainly via e-mail. An academic CV must also be submitted, but please limit these to two pages.

Paper Requirements
In order to facilitate presentation time limits, and to ensure time for active discussions, paper length will be limited to 8 typed pages, double-spaced, with 12-point font. All accepted participants will be required to submit a copy of the final paper one month prior to the conference.

Registration Requirements
To better promote a meaningful interdisciplinary exchange, participants are expected to attend all panels for the duration of the conference.
Although we cannot provide travel support, we will be happy to arrange housing for the duration of the conference with graduate students.
The registration fee is $25.00, which includes meals. Registration fee must be paid by cash or check at registration on February 26, 2010.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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Bukhara Cultural Night with Maqam Ensemble, October 14

You’re invited to a free concert and cultural night this coming Wednesday! Maqam Ensemble is coming from Queens; look for their posters on campus bulletin boards.

Event: Bukhara Cultural Night with Maqam Ensemble

Free and open to the public! Join us for an exploration of the cultures of Bukhara, Uzbekistan

Maqam is a Jewish ensemble from the city of Bukhara that plays shashmaqam music, a vocal and instrumental style with roots in the diverse cultures of Central Asia, including Jewish folk song and Sufi love poetry.

The evening will also include Uzbek poetry readings, a presentation of background information on Bukharan culture, and a FREE Bukharan dinner!

Please join us!

What: Concert/ Cultural Night
Start Time: Wednesday, October 14 at 6:00pm
End Time: Wednesday, October 14 at 9:00pm
Where: International House Assembly Hall, University of Chicago

Posted in: University of Chicago Events
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