Blog Archives

Closing Day Tour of Vision and Communism

Last Chance: Soviet Propaganda
Closing-day tour January 22, 2 pm
Smart Museum of Art

On January 22 at 2 pm, join Matthew Jesse Jackson, Associate Professor of Art History and Visual Arts at the University of Chicago, and Kimberly Mims, PhD candidate at the University of Chicago, for a closing-day tour of Vision and Communism and the related exhibition Process and Artistry in the Soviet Vanguard.

Posted in: Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience, University of Chicago Events

Opening Reception, Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage

Opening Reception, Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage
Wednesday, January 11, 2012 at 06:00 PM
DOVA Temporary Gallery, 5228 S. Harper Ave

Between 1956 and 2006 the Polish reporter and poet Ryszard Kapuściński travelled to more than 100 countries, documenting wars of decolonization, resistance movements, and everyday life. Kapuściński published numerous books in those 50 years, reknowned works of literary reportage that have been translated into 36 languages. Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage chronicles the writer’s life and work in a series of photographs, many taken by Kapuściński himself, accompanied by excerpts from Kapuściński’s writing and historical background on the events he witnessed.

The opening reception will include talks by Consul Robert Rusiecki of the Polish Consulate of Chicago and Kinga Kosmala, Lecturer in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the UChicago. Light refreshments will be served.

Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage runs from January 9 -February 4, 2012

This exhibit is sponsored by The Consulate General of Republic of Poland in Chicago, The Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies at the UChicago, UChicago’s Department of Visual Arts, DOVA (Department of Visual Arts) Temporary Gallery, and The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the UChicago.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience, University of Chicago Events

Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage

Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage
Monday, January 09, 2012 at 09:00 AM
DOVA Temporary Gallery, 5228 S. Harper Ave

Between 1956 and 2006 the Polish reporter and poet Ryszard Kapuściński travelled to more than 100 countries, documenting wars of decolonization, resistance movements, and everyday life. Kapuściński published numerous books in those 50 years, reknowned works of literary reportage that have been translated into 36 languages. Ryszard Kapuściński: The Poet of Reportage chronicles the writer’s life and work in a series of photographs, many taken by Kapuściński himself, accompanied by excerpts from Kapuściński’s writing and historical background on the events he witnessed.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience, University of Chicago Events

Teacher Workshop: Learning History and Culture through Soviet Children’s Books

Teacher Workshop
Learning History and Culture through Soviet Children’s Books
University of Chicago
Regenstein Library
Saturday, November 12, 2011
2:00-5:00

The University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center is currently home to an exhibit of Soviet children’s books entitled Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Children’s Books and Graphic Art. The exhibit is accompanied by an extensive collection of online resources and pedagogical materials.

During a three hour teacher workshop Claire Roosien will give participants a tour of the exhibit and an introduction to the web resources. She will also provide handouts for use in class and lead a discussion on ways that the material from the exhibit could be used to teach Russian language as well to teach on historical themes such as identity, colonialism, and industrialization.

Teachers will receive three CPDUs for attending.

If you plan to attend this workshop please register by sending an email to Dana Immertreu at immertreu@uchicago.edu.

To print a flyer for this workshop, download the following pdf: flyer_Nov12Workshop

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.), Soviet Arts Experience, Teacher Development

Conversations: Reflections on the Soviet Experience

Conversations: Reflections on the Soviet Experience
Join the University of Chicago Graham School, in partnership with the Soviet Arts Experience, for a series of three conversations on the social and political environment of the Soviet era.
Conversations will be led by Martha Merritt, Associate Dean for International Education at the University of Chicago.

On October 6th, Slavic professor Robert Bird will discuss how artists dealt with the constraints on free expression in the Soviet Union and, in the process, will challenge our assumptions about the way media functioned under Communism. What were the similarities and differences between the media systems of the USSR and the United States? Both served to form social identities, but also to provide a space for expression, even in conditions of repression and oppression. A particular focus will be the final years of Soviet rule, when a clumsy political system was being challenged by technologically savvy media pioneers.

On October 13th, political scientist John Mearsheimer will talk about the legacy of the Soviet Union and the Cold War. In 1990, Professor Mearsheimer wrote a provocative article for the Atlantic Monthly entitled, “Why We Will Soon Miss the Cold War,” in which he noted that the conditions that had made for decades of peace in the West were fast disappearing. He noted that we may “wake up one day lamenting the loss of the order that the Cold War gave to the anarchy of international relations.” Have we reached the day?

On October 20th, human rights scholar Jennifer Amos will shed light on what human rights meant in Soviet society. The communist government was among the most vocal advocates of what it called cultural, economic, and social rights, as well as the rights of minority and colonial peoples. It introduced universal education, universal health care, and eliminated unemployment. At the same time, the Soviet Union built one of the most notorious systems of forced labor camps and created elaborate networks to spy on its citizens. Since the fall of communism, Western conceptions of human rights have received mixed reactions at best. Why is this the case?

***

All conversations take place from 6 to 7:30 pm at
University of Chicago Gleacher Center
450 N. Cityfront Plaza Drive

Each lecture is $10, or free for University students who present a valid ID. To register, or for more information, click here.

For more information please contact Sarah Pesin in the Graham School Partnerships Office at culturalpartnerships@uchicago.edu or 773.702.2768.

Posted in: Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience, University of Chicago Events

Event Listings for Vision and Communism at the Smart Museum

The Exhibition
Vision and Communism draws on an extensive private collection of Soviet art and propaganda, presenting nearly 90 captivating and emotionally gripping images by Soviet artist Viktor Koretsky (1909-1998). In contrast to more conventional Soviet propaganda, Koretsky created striking scenes of survival and suffering that were designed to connect Soviet citizens with others struggling for civil rights and independence around the globe. This vision of a multicultural world of shared sacrifice offered a dynamic alternative to the sleek consumerism of Madison Avenue and the West and, according to the curators, can be thought of “as a kind of Communist advertising for a future that never quite arrived.”
http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/vision-and-communism/

Opening Reception
Join us Thursday, September 29, from 5:30-7:30 pm for a panel discussion featuring curators Christopher Heuer (Princeton University), Matthew Jesse Jackson (University of Chicago), Tumelo Mosaka (Krannert Art Museum), and Stephanie Smith (Smart Museum of Art). The discussion will be followed by an exhibition viewing and reception with free food and refreshments.

Notable Events
Film Series: Medvedkin and Marker, Wednesdays, October 12, 19 and November 2, 7 pm, Film Studies Center
The exhibition’s themes are extended to cinema through screenings of the militant films of Aleksandr Medvedkin and Chris Marker at the Film Studies Center. For a complete list of films and synopses, and to make reservations, visit filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu or call 773.702.8596.

Agitation! a Symposium, Friday October 14, 9 am – 6:30 pm, Special Collections Research Center, Joseph Regenstein Library
Join leading scholars for a public symposium that examines art and political agitation. The day-long event includes panel discussions and keynote addresses from Catriona Kelly (University of Oxford), William Ayers (University of Illinois at Chicago), and Bernadine Dorn (Northwestern University). Register to attend and find a full schedule of topics and speakers at smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/symposium

Lunch-hour Talk: “Envisioning Another World and Taking on Big Enemies,” Friday, October 21, 12 pm
Prexy Nesbitt, professor of African History at Columbia College, discusses the triumphs and failings of African liberation struggles during the Cold War. Space is limited. Please register in advance. http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/calendar/register/

Lunch-hour Talk: “Empire of Liberation? The Soviet Union, U.S. Race Relations, and the Cold War,” Wednesday, November 2, 12 pm
Examine the historical record behind the events depicted in Viktor Koretsky’s propaganda posters during this lunch-hour talk by Rachel Appelbaum. Space is limited. Please register in advance. http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/calendar/register/

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience, University of Chicago Events

Battleship Potemkin at the Block Cinema

Battleship Potemkin
Block Cinema
Sept 23, 2011
7pm

Block Cinema opens its fall season with a nwely restored 35mm print of Sergei Eisenstein’s masterpiece. Admission is $4 with Block membership, Northwestern WildCARD, or student ID; $6 without.

Posted in: Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience

Now Open–Shostakovich at Northwestern

Shostakovich at Northwestern
September 20, 2011-March 19, 2012
Deering Library
Third Floor

This exhibit, a collaboration between Northwestern’s Music Library and Northwestern University Archives, recalls Shostakovich’s visit to Evanston in June 1973, including the ceremony awarding him an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts. In addition, this exhibit displays a small collection of rare, limited-edition musical scores by Shostakovich published in the Soviet Union during the 1940s.

Posted in: Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience

Now Open–They Were Fighting for Our Freedom: American and Soviet Propaganda Posters of World War II

They Were Fighting for Our Freedom: American and Soviet Propaganda Posters of World War II
September 20, 2011-March 19, 2012
Northwestern University Library
First Floor and in the connector hallway to the Deering Library

This exhibit, a collaboration between Northwestern University Library and the Peter the Great Museum/Kunstkamera, St. Petersburg, Russia, consists of several dozen American and Soviet World War II posters, grouped to reveal how similar themes—courage, strength in numbers, the home front, heroic military traditions, the vile foe—were developed in the different artistic languages of these two countries, but otherwise in surprisingly similar ways. The exhibit has already been shown at several venues across Europe, e.g. in Bratislava, Budapest, Prague, and The Hague.

Posted in: Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience

Opening Friday–Tango with Cows: Book Art of the Russian Avant-Garde, 1910–1917

Tango with Cows: Book Art of the Russian Avant-Garde, 1910–1917
September 23–December 11, 2011
Alsdorf Gallery

Tango with Cows chronicles the dramatic transformation of book art during the tumultuous years before the Russian Revolution.

The exhibition takes its title from a book and poem by the Russian avant-garde poet Vasily Kamensky. The absurd image of farm animals dancing the tango evokes the clash in Russia between a primarily rural culture and a growing urban life. During the years spanning the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Russia was in spiritual, social, and cultural crisis. The moral devastation of the failed 1905 revolution, the famines of 1911, the rapid influx of new technologies, and the outbreak of World War I led to disillusionment with modernity and a presentiment of apocalypse.

Avant-garde artists and writers responded to this crisis by collaborating on hand-lithographed publications that combined primitive and abstract imagery with experimental sound poetry to convey intense ambivalence about their country’s past, present, and future.

This exhibition has been organized by The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.

For more information visit http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/exhibitions/current/tango.html.

Posted in: Chicago Events, Soviet Arts Experience