Blog Archives

The Scale Model: An Interdisciplinary Symposium

The Scale Model: An Interdisciplinary Symposium
Nov 2-3, 2012
To be held at Northwestern University

Check back soon for more information.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News

A Close Viewing: Bondarchuk’s War and Peace Part III

Film Studies Center
6pm

Like Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, the depiction of the Battle of Borodino in Sergei Bondarchuk’s War and Peace is a bombastic and bone-shaking work of art. It is a legendary technological and organizational achievement, featuring thousands of extras and explosives in some of the most complicated shots ever committed to film. But it is also notable for its experiments with point of view, long tracking shots, and complex mise-en-scene, centered on the figure of the director himself, who, as Tolstoy’s main character Pierre Bezukhov, wanders through the scene in a white top hat and spectacles, marveling at what he is filming. To mark the 200th anniversary of Russia’s confrontation with Napoleon’s Grand Army, we will watch Part III of Bondarchuk’s film, the majority of which is devoted to the battle, and which (like the film’s other segments) appeared on Soviet screens as a separate release. The battle achieves its own climactic ending, and will leave us with plenty to talk about.

War and Peace, Part III
Sergei Bondarchuk
Mosfilm, 1967
77 min.
In Russian with English subtitles

Introduction and post-film discussion by William Nickell (Slavic Languages & Literatures)

A Slavic Colloquium event, sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures & CEERES

Posted in: CEERES Events/News

Wisława Szymborska Exhibit at the Regenstein Library

New exhibit at the Regenstein Library
Now through September 2012

The Joy of Writing.
The Power of Preserving.
Revenge of a Mortal Hand.
Wisława Szymborska
1923 – 2012

One of two daughters, Wisława Szymborska was born in the small town of Bnin, Poland on July 2, 1923. At the age of eight, her family moved to Kraków, where she was to spend the rest of her life. She attended a private lycée (Academy of the Sisters of the Ursuline Order) until 1939, continuing her education in an underground study group during the Nazi occupation of Poland. At Kraków’s Jagellonian University, she studied sociology and Polish philology, after which she worked at a number of local publishing houses. From 1953 through the mid-1960s, she was the editor of the poetry section of the influential weekly Życie Literackie. In 1966, after the expulsion of the philosopher Leszek Kołakowski from the Communist Party for his “revisionist” views, and in an act of solidarity, Szymborska relinquished her own party membership, leading to her eventual resignation as editor; by 1978 she had severed all ties with this publication. With a few exceptions for literary awards and tokens of public appreciation, her life, shared with a small circle of friends, remained quiet and private—she rarely travelled, avoided public gatherings and hated being photographed or interviewed. Although resolutely avoiding politics as much as possible, she nevertheless participated in a variety of human rights activities.

Despite her aversion to public activities and nonliterary statements, during the late 1970s, and particularly after the imposition of martial law in 1981, she lent her support on several occations to the protest actions and educational initiatives sponsored by human rights groups such as KOR (Workers’ Defense Committee); she was also one of the founding members of the Association of Polish Writers, an independent professional organization that sought to continue the venerable traditions of the Polish Writers’ Union after its forcible dissolution by the military regime in 1982. (Stanisław Barańczak, Dictionary of Literary Biography: Twentieth-Century Eastern European Writers, Third Series, 2001, v. 232, pp. 357-362.)
Szymborska was a leading figure among the outstanding Polish poets of the post-World War II generation and among her many prestigious Polish and European literary awards was the Nobel Prize for Literature (1996); she was the fourth Polish author to be so honored.

Hers is an inclusive gaze that extends beyond the local and anthropocentric. Western culture, humankind, and the natural world are the subjects of moral, logical, and aesthetic consideration in her poetry. Szymborska is a poet who finds the extraordinary in the ordinary, the seemingly unimportant and insignificant… She approaches the subject of art with a generous dose of irony: skeptical of the privileged role of the artist and cognizant of the illusory character of art, she is nonetheless aware of the capacity of art to transport humans beyond the constraints of the physical world. As she puts it… art is, after all, the “revenge of the mortal hand”. (Joanna Trzeciak, Dictionary of Literary Biography: Nobel Prize Laureates in Literature, Part 4, 2007, v. 332, pp. 331-32.)

Szymborska is also known to Polish readers as a distinguished translator of 16th & 17th century French poetry, as well as the essays of Montaigne, and to the delight of her friends, the creator of witty and winsome hand-made postcards.

The exhibit will run through September 2012 . (4th Floor Reading Room, Regenstein Library)

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events

Motoki Nomachi: “Contact-Induced Grammatical Change: A case from Kashubian passive voice”

Motoki Nomachi
Contact-induced grammatical change: a case from Kashubian passive voice
May 23, 2012
4:30 p.m.
Foster 103

Motoki Nomachi is an associate professor in the Slavic Research Center at Hokkaido University (Sapporo, Japan). He holds a Ph.D in Slavic linguistics from the University of Tokyo. His current research addresses the grammatical typology of Slavic languages and the language contact with a special attention to Kashubian.
Dr. Nomachi is also interested in sociolinguistic topics on small Slavic literary languages such as Banat Bulgarian, Lachian and West Polesian.

He has published and edited some books, including Grammaticalization in Slavic Languages: From Areal and Typological Perspectives (Sapporo, 2010), The Grammar of Possessivity in South Slavic Languages: Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives (Sapporo, 2011), Borders of Identity and Language in the Slavic World (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming, co-edited by Tomasz Kamusella)

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events

Sheila Fitzpatrick at the Russian Studies Workshop

Russian Studies Workshop
Tuesday, May 29, 4:30-6:00 (snacks from 4:15!)
John Hope Franklin Room (SSRB 224)

You are invited to join the final meeting of the year of the interdisciplinary Russian Studies Workshop on May 29, when they will discuss an article by Sheila Fitzpatrick (Dept. of History, University of Chicago), entitled “POPULAR/ PUBLIC OPINION UNDER TWENTIETH-CENTURY COMMUNIST REGIMES.” Refreshments will be available at 4:15, and discussion will begin at 4:30.

The article is now available on the workshop’s chalk site under “Current Paper.” If you do not have access to the chalk site, please email Leah Goldman at ldgoldman@uchicago.edu, and I will be glad to send you a copy. Please also contact Leah if you have any questions, comments, or otherwise need assistance.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Chicago Events

Tolga Cora: “Ways to make big money in the mid-19th century Karin/Erzurum”

The UChicago Armenian Circle presents

Why was Khachatur Bastoormajean murdered? Ways to make big money in
the mid-19th century Karin/Erzurum.
by Tolga Cora

(in English)

Tuesday, May 22
4:30 pm

Room TBA
Open to everyone!

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events

Zhivka Valiavicharska at the Russian Studies Workshop

Russian Studies Workshop
Tuesday, May 8, 4:30-6:00 (snacks from 4:15!)
John Hope Franklin Room (SSRB 224)

The next meeting of the interdisciplinary Russian Studies Workshop will be held on May 8, when they will discuss a paper by Zhivka Valiavicharska (Harper-Schmidt Fellow, University of Chicago), entitled “Totalitarianism and Utopia: Dissident Discourses during Late Socialism”. Refreshments will be available at 4:15, and discussion will begin at 4:30.

The paper is now available on the workshop’s chalk site
under “Current Paper.” If you do not have access to the chalk site, please email Leah Goldman at ldgoldman@uchicago.edu to get a copy. Please also contact Leah if you have any questions, comments, or otherwise need assistance.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Chicago Events, University of Chicago Events

Adeeb Khalid: “Exploring Uzbekistan’s Cultural Revolution, 1917-1927″

Lecture
Adeeb Khalid: “Exploring Uzbekistan’s Cultural Revolution, 1917-1927″
May 21, 2012
3pm
Classics 110

Prof Khalid is the Jane and Raphael Bernstein Professor of Asian
Studies and History at Carleton College. He is the author of two books, The Politics of Muslim
Cultural Reform: Jadidism in Central Asia (University of California
Press, 1998), and Islam after Communism: Religion and Politics in
Central Asia (University of California Press, 2007), which won the
2008 AAASS Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize “for the most important
contribution to Russian, Eurasian, and East European studies in any
discipline of the humanities or social sciences published in English
in the United States in the previous calendar year.”

There will be a Q&A following the talk.

Co-sponsored by CEERES and the Central Asian Studies Society.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events

May Day Meeting of the Russian Studies Workshop

Russian Studies Workshop
Tuesday, May 1, 4:30-6:00 (snacks from 4:15!)
John Hope Franklin Room (SSRB 224)

Workers of the world, unite (in the John Hope Franklin Room)!

The interdisciplinary Russian Studies Workshop is having a special May Day meeting on May 1, when they will discuss a chapter by Flora Roberts (Dept. of History, University of Chicago), entitled “Purging the Old Elites (1933-1938)”, from her dissertation, “Old Elites under Communism: a case study of Soviet Khujand”. Refreshments will be available at 4:15, and we will begin our discussion at 4:30.

The chapter is now available on the workshop’s chalk site
under “Current Paper.” An additional selection will become available on chalk shortly. If you do not have access to the chalk site, please email Leah Goldman at ldgoldman@uchicago.edu, and she will send you a copy. Please also contact Leah if you have any questions, comments, claims against the bourgeoisie, or otherwise need assistance.

Differently abled persons who may need assistance are requested to email Workshop Coordinator Leah Goldman in advance at ldgoldman@uchicago.edu

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, University of Chicago Events

Summer Institute: Slavic and Eurasian Languages–Acquisition, Techniques, and Technologies

SUMMER INSTITUTE: SLAVIC & EURASIAN LANGUAGES—ACQUISITION, TECHNIQUES, AND TECHNOLOGIES
July 16-18, 2012
Duke University
Durham, NC

The Duke Slavic and Eurasian Language Resource Center will host a summer institute from July 16-18 for instructors (K-12 and university faculty) and language program coordinators in Slavic and Eurasian languages.

Speakers from Duke University, the U.S. Department of Defense, the University of Arizona, and other leading institutions will present on topics including

· Teaching language and culture through film

· Specialized language instruction at the advanced and superior levels

· The use of technology in the language classroom

· Integrating heritage students in the language classroom

· Addressing the needs of differently-abled students

· Using computer technologies to create pedagogical materials

· The role of grammar in proficiency-based instruction

· Popular culture and language instruction

· Web resources for Slavic and East European language teachers

Cost: There are NO registration or tuition fees to attend the SEELRC Summer Institute. However, participants must pay for their own travel expenses, accommodations, and food. Lunches and one dinner will be provided. Depending on the availability of funds, SEELRC may award partial stipends to defray travel costs to qualified applicants.

Lodging: SEELRC staff will assist participants in making housing arrangements. Accommodations will be either on the Duke campus or within walking distance to Duke.

Attendance for the summer institute is limited to 20 people.

Interested language instructors should contact Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu for further information.

Posted in: CEERES Events/News, Teacher Development