Chicago Center for Jewish Studies Campus Events

Chicago Center for Jewish Studies
Campus Events
November 28-December 2, 2011

For more details, see: http://jewishstudies.uchicago.edu

At a glance:

· Jewish Studies and the Hebrew Bible Workshop, featuring Sam Brody, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago Divinity School: November 28, 12:00 pm

· Important note: the talk on the Jewish Book that had been planned for November 29 has been CANCELED.
Concert by the New Budapest Orpheum Society: December 1, 7:00 pm

· CCJS Graduate Working Group, featuring Katharine Pflaum, Ph.D. Student, University of Chicago Divinity School: December 2, 12:00 pm

Film Screening, Persistence, with a presentation by film scholar Jeffrey Skoller, University of California, Berkeley, and an introduction by the filmmaker, Daniel Eisenberg, School of the Art Institute of Chicago: December 2, 2:15 pm
Workshop: Sites/Traces/Manifestations of Jewish Pasts, Presents, and Futures, December 1-2. Registration requested. For full program and speaker bios, see http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/jewishpasts

Full details:

Monday, November 28

Jewish Studies and the Hebrew Bible Workshop
From Political Theology to Theo-Politics: Martin Buber’s Anarchistic Inversion of Carl Schmitt

Sam Brody, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago Divinity School
Swift Hall, Rm. 200
1025 E. 58th St.
12:00 pm

For more details about this event or the Workshop, contact Workshop Coordinator Erik Dreff at edreff@uchicago.edu. Papers are usually available for download from the Workshop website a week in advance: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/jst_hb/.

Thursday, December 1
Concert by the New Budapest Orpheum Society
Swift Hall, Common Room
1025 E. 58th St.
7:00-8:00 pm

The New Budapest Orpheum Society is a seven–member ensemble in residence in the Division of the Humanities at the University of Chicago performing Jewish Cabaret music and political songs from the turn of the 20th century to the present, exploring original materials in Hebrew, Yiddish, and German. The cabaret group has released three CDs, most recently “Jewish Cabaret in Exile” (2009, Cedille Records) and has performed locally and internationally, from Chicago-area synagogues to Broadway to clubs in Berlin and Vienna, with frequent appearances at Jewish community and cultural organizations. The ensemble’s current project draws upon song composed for the golden age of German-Jewish and Yiddish film during the 1920s and 1930s. The Artistic Director is Philip V. Bohlman and the Music Director is Ilya Levinson.

This concert is presented as part of a two-day workshop entitled Sites/Traces/Manifestations of Jewish Pasts, Presents and Futures. The workshop is made possible by the Aronberg Fund and the Meyer Fund of the Chicago Center for Jewish Studies, the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory, the Franke Institute for the Humanities, and the Office of the Provost. To learn more about the workshop, see the workshop blog: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/jewishpasts/

Friday, December 2
Screening of Persistence and Presentation, “Refugees, Remnants, Reanimations: Embodied History, and the Cinema Trace”
Daniel Eisenberg, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Jeffrey Skoller, University of California, Berkeley
Film Studies Center, Cobb Hall, Rm. 307
5811 S. Ellis Ave.
2:15 pm

An award-winning documentary, Persistence is a feature-length experimental portrait of Berlin in the years following the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the cold war. A meditation on the time just after a great historical event, the film explores what is common to such moments, the continuous and discontinuous threads of history.

Daniel Eisenberg has been making films and videos since 1976. His films have been screened throughout Europe, Asia, and North America with solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), the Pacific Film Archive (Berkeley), the American Museum of the Moving Image (New York), the Musée du Cinema, (Brussels), De Unie (Rotterdam) and Kino Arsenal (Berlin). His films have been shown in the Berlin Film Festival; the New York Film Festival; the Sydney Film Festival; the London Film Festival; the Jerusalem Film Festival; Vue Sur Les Docs, Marseilles; and the Whitney Biennial (New York). Eisenberg’s films have won numerous awards, fellowships, and honors. Among these are a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship; the D.A.A.D. Berliner Künstlerprogramm Fellowship; and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Eisenberg lives and works in Chicago and is a Professor in the departments of Film/Video/New Media/Animation, and Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Jeffrey Skoller is a writer, filmmaker and has made over a dozen films that have been exhibited in museums, universities and festivals internationally. His research focuses on the theories and aesthetics of historical representation in Avant-Garde film, video, photography and new media. Screenings and exhibitions include: The Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley; Museum of the Moving Image, NY; JP Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA, Whitney Museum, NY; P.S. 1, NY; Flaherty Film Seminar, NY; Arsenal Kino, Berlin; Mannheim Film Festival, Germany; The Latin American Film Festival, Havana; National Film Theatre, London. Skoller’s essays and articles on experimental film and video have appeared in numerous books, artist catalogues and in journals including Film Quarterly; Discourse; Afterimage; Animation, Cinematograph, among others. His books are Shadows, Specters, Shards: Making History in Avant-Garde Film (University of Minnesota Press) and POSTWAR: The Films of Daniel Eisenberg (Blackdog Press). Skoller is currently Associate Professor in Dept of Film and Media at UC Berkeley.

This event is presented as part of a workshop entitled “Sites/Traces/Manifestations of Jewish Pasts, Presents, and Futures,” to be held on December 1 and 2. For information about the workshop, see the workshop blog at http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/jewishpasts. If you require assistance to participate fully in this event, please contact Christina Heisser at cheisser@uchicago.edu or 773-702-7108.

This event is made possible by the Aronberg Fund and the Meyer Fund of the Chicago Center for Jewish Studies, in collaboration with the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory, the Franke Institute for the Humanities, and the Office of the Provost.

Thursday and Friday, December 1-2
Workshop: Sites/Traces/Manifestations of Jewish Pasts, Presents, and Futures
Various locations: see http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/jewishpasts for a full program
Thursday, 9:30 am – 9:00 pm
Friday, 9:30 am – 6:15 pm

Featuring presentations and work by:
Leora Auslander, History, University of Chicago
Philip Bohlman, Music, University of Chicago
Daniel Eisenberg, Film/Video/New Media/Animation, and Visual and Critical Studies, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Cilly Kugelmann, Program Director and Vice Director, Jewish Museum Berlin
Frank Mecklenburg, Director of Research and Chief Archivist, Leo Baeck Institute
Sven-Erik Rose, French and Italian, Miami University, Ohio
Ellen Rothenberg, Visual Art, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Alice Schreyer, Assistant Director for Preservation & Special Collections, Director of the Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library
Anna Shteynshleyger, Photography, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Jeffrey Skoller, Film and Media, University of California, Berkeley

Pre-registration for the workshop is requested, and we request that the participants commit to attend the entire workshop. Contact Christina Heisser at cheisser@uchicago.edu or 773-702-7108 to register.

While agreement concerning the importance of commemorating and transmitting Jewish history is easy to achieve, questions of both which parts of the past should be emphasized and the best media for that commemoration and transmission are far more controversial. Should priority be placed on remembering the violence done to Jews or documenting Jewish communal, religious, intellectual, or cultural life? Are different genres needed when the primary intended audience are Jews or non-Jews? What can best be done by artists, whether photographers, film-makers, composers, novelists, or poets? What can scholarship and classroom teaching best convey? What is the role of museums and archives in this memory labor?

The workshop will focus on efforts in France, Germany and the United States, in a variety of genres, to transmit aspects of the Jewish past to contemporary audiences including both Jews and non-Jews, children and adults, scholars and lay people. Most of the participants engage the question of transmission of the experiences of European Jews in the 20th century, but some are concerned with either earlier times or other places.

For more information about the workshop, including bios of the workshop presenters, see the workshop blog at: lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/jewishpasts/

Friday, December 2
CCJS Graduate Working Group
The ‘Raw I’ versus ‘The Collective We:’ Negotiating American Jewish Identity in The Adventures of Augie March and The Human Stain
Katharine Pflaum (Ph.D Student in Religion and Literature)
Social Science Tea Room (SS 201)
12:00 pm

This graduate student only workshop brings together graduate students across the disciplines with research interests in Jewish Studies. The workshop gives graduate students an opportunity to receive feedback at any stage of their work in a welcoming environment. The format of our meetings can accommodate anything from presenting conference papers and practicing Q&A’s, to getting feedback on the development of course papers, grant applications, exam lists, dissertation proposals, dissertation chapters, etc.

From Katharine Pflaum: My presentation will examine two influential American novels with complicated portraits of contemporary American Jewry: Saul Bellow’s “The Adventures of Augie March” (1953) and Philip Roth’s “The Human Stain” (2000). Though Bellow and Roth have each been the subject of extensive critical analysis, a careful consideration of “Augie March” and “The Human Stain,” read together, will enhance understanding of the fraught process of Jewish American identity formation. Central to both novels is the determination to write a story in the genre of the great American novel through the figure of the Jew. This connection between the two novels operates on multiple levels: the thematic (recurring questions of assimilation and identity), the historical (the link between Bellow and Roth as novelists writing from two distinct periods in the American twentieth century), and the literary (issues related to narrative autonomy, structure, and perspective).

Refreshments will be served. Find more information at http://ccjsgraduateworkinggroup.wordpress.com/ or email workshop coordinators Katharine Pflaum and Joela Zeller at cjs.grad.ws@gmail.com.

Events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Contact Christina Heisser at 773.702.7108 or cheisser@uchicago.edu with questions or to request a disability accommodation.

Posted in: Chicago Events, University of Chicago Events

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